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October 14, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

70 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

il4r Mirktgatt Emig
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credit-
ed in this paper and also the local news
published herein.
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan . Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.5o; b mail,,$3.00.
Want ad stations: Quarry's; tudents' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta. Phones: Business, 960;
Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock , each
evening.
Robert T. McDonald.......Managing Editor
C. Philip Emery.........Business Manager
Harold Makinson......Advertising Manager
Paul E. Cholette.......Publication Manager
Bernard WohI.. .......Circulation Manager
Harold R. Smith............ Credit Manager
Wm. M. LeFevre..........Office Manager
1. Ellsworth Robinson..Subscription Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
Bruce A. Swaney James Schermerhorn, Jr.
Harry Carey C. S. Clark, Jr.
Clarence L. Roeser
REPORTERS -
Albert E. Horne, Jr. Bruce Millar
Philip C. Pack Harry W. Weinerman
Denman H. Cruttenden Edgar L. Rice
Mildred C. Mighell Mark K. hlbert
Eugene Given

W omen
Juniors and seniors who are inter-
ested in archery report to Miss Mar-
ion Wood, instructor in the depart-
ment of physical education at 4:30'
o'clock Monday afternoon.
Senior hockey practice will be held
at 3:30 o'clock Monday afternoon.
Juniors will practice at the same hour
on Tuesday.
Locker assignments may 'be obtain-
ed at Barbour gymnasium from 9:30
to 11:30 except Saturday. Gymnasium
supplies will be sold from 1:30 to 4:30
o'clock every day except Friday and
Saturday this week.
Stylus will meet at 7:30 o'clock
Tuesday night with Lucile Quarry, '18,
1746 Washtenaw.
Women living in private families
or in league houses of six members or
less are invited to tea at Newberry
residence at 4 o'clock on Thursday
afternoon.
"M ATE FOR HLLU

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TWO SPECIAL COURSES
IN RELIGION
"The Making of the New Testament," Prof. Leroy
Waterman. Sunday, 9:30 A. M.
"The Ideal Life," Rev. John Mason Wells. Sunday,
12:00 P. M.
CLASS HELD IN BAPTIST GUILD HOUSE
503 E. Huron Street

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Courses in Bible Study at the Bible Chair House
444 South State Street
The "UPPER ROOM" Bible class, for University Men of all classes, meets
every Saturday evening from 7 to 8 o'clock. Enrollment last year, 400. A fine
Fellowship. "REPRESENTATIVE MEN OF THE BIBLE" will be the general
theme for this year's study. We think the great life lessons contained in this Book
may be learned best by grouping them around the personalities described therein.
The following Courses are open to both women and men: "A GENERAL SUR-
VEY OF THE BIBLE"-4 o'clock Wednesday afternoons, beginning October io.
"SOME SCIENTIFIC ASPECTS OF RELIGION AND THE BIBLE"-4 o'clock
Sunday afternoons, beginning October 7. "THE SOCIAL, ETHICAL AND RELIG-
IOUS TEACHING OF JESUS"-Friday afternoons at 4 o'clock, beginning October
26. "THE PROPHETIC AND WISDOM LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE"-
6:30 o'clock Thursday evenings, beginning October 18.
A Bible class especially for Law Students is contemplated and another for the
discussion of Students' Religious and Biblical Problems. Ask Mr. Iden about them.
There is no necessary expense connected with any of these courses, and, with the
single exception of the "Upper Room" class for men, they are open to any and all
who are interested. Full description of these courses furnished free on request. Free

I

BUSINESS STAFF
L. A. Storrer Orville E. Gates
Wm. A. Leitzinger Harry D. Hause
Dale H. Baad Lambert Hirsheimer
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1917.
Night Editor-C. S. Clark, Jr.
YOUR SHARE
YOU are wanted by workers of the
second Liberty loan.
When one of the committee ap-
proaches you,, remember that he is
not seeking your roommate, or the
man in the next house. He wants you.
To get you, it may be necessary that
youmake a sacrifice. So much the
better. You should when you take
into considration that 1300 Michigan
men are giving not the. pleasure of a
few "big tims," but a sacrifice of
themselves in facing German guns.
Your share doesn't mean to your
nation what you can conveniently
spare, what is actually a surplus to
you. Your share means that you have
given up the luxuries of life, that
you are living as economically as pos-
sible. If you thought yesterday that
you could take a $50 bond, take stock
of yourself now and raise your ante
to a higher level.
APPROPOS OF FORMALS
Sororities have abolished formals.
Fraternities next. Now that a decisive
step has been taken by the sorority
women, there is no reason why the
men should not follow in their foot-
steps. This is a year when extra ac-
tivities should be cut to a minium. It
is an admitted fact that formals are
more or less of a bother and that oft-
en they do not produce as much joy
as informals. If there is no point in
holding formals, they should be dis-
pensed with.
House dances and the weekly
dances of the Illinois Union and the
Student council can easily supplant
expensive formal affairs and furnish
just as much enjoyment. In all prob-
ability there will be a formal Junior
Prom and that should suffice for this
semester. House formals are unnec-
essary and a useless expense.
In lieu of formals, however, there
might well be an increased number of
informal affairs. More house danc-
ing with several house organizations
combining would reduce expenses of
hiring the hall and furnish more con-
genial surroundings at the same time.
There is no reason for keeping the
formal. It should be dispensed with,
and the informal substituted. the
Daily Illini.r
Speaking of cold weather, Mt. Union
was just about snowed under.
Wieman isn't kicking goals with his
eyes closed at present, but that doesn't
deter several from believing he could
do it.

JOHN W. SCHOLL SAYS
HAS MISREPRESENTED
DELUDE STUDENTS

HELBER
CASE TO

reading room and library. Use them.

IWO.MMMOMER

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
In your interview with Mr. Helber,
editor and publisher of the Washte-
naw Post, printed in a recent issue,
you lay before your readers matter
which calls for the most emphatic
challenge.
The people of this city know the
situation too well to permit the gen-
tleman in question to play the role
of injured innocence, but the student
body, coming from all corners of the
country and not knowing the facts,
might be led to infer that sinister
agencies are at work for the undoing
of good citizens who have merely
courageously insisted upon their con-
stitutional rights.
Mr. Helber is represented as deny-
ing that he published pro-German edi-
torials in his paper. If this report is
correct, Mr. Helber has stated the ex-
act opposite of the truth, as any one
can observe for himself, if he will
read them. It is hardly too much to
say, that every issue from the out-
break of the war in 1914 down to his
latest has had its editorial columns,
news columns, literary columns,. full
of pro-German stuff wherever it could
be stowed. It will not do to try to
add mendacity to the old offenses.
Mr. Helber charges persecution by
a small group of personal enemies,
who out of spite wish to ruin his busi-
ness. It would be strange if a few
personal enemies could induce the
postoffice department of the United
States to become the tool of their
private revenge. In fact, Mr. Helber's
"enemies" are that great body of
American citizens, who, while fight-
ing the enemy in front, will not per-
mit traitors to skulk in the rear. They
are not even interested in Mr. Helber
personally. They are fighting a nuis-
ance with more heads than Hydra's
and care little personally what head
is lopped off, so it falls.
The plain fact is, that the postoffice
department at Washington has in hand
extracts from the Washtenaw Post,
editorials in English, translations of
German editorials and news notes, and
other necessary information, and
doubtless believes that the new
espionage act applies and requires im-
mediate action. If Mr. Helber does
not go to Washington in person or by
proxy, it is quite as likely that it is
because he has no case as that he
can trust with a good conscience to
the weakness of his "ienemies."
If Mr. Helber honestly thinks that
any citizen of the United States could
say with perfect justice everything
that he has published in his paper, it
merely proves how dangerous he is.
Most citizens do not agree with Mr.
Helber's published notions, namely:
that America has entered this war
merely to save the loans made to
France and Great Britain; that Ger-
many is not our enemy now, and never
has been, and is not now making war
upon us; that our war is merely a
war of conquest-for Britain's advan-
tage; that our government hypocritic-
ally forced the draft law through con-
gress to create an army to fight Ja-
pan, knowing that the war would be
ended with a German victory before
we could get into it; that the govern-
ment has no right to send our soldiers
to fight on foreign soil; that the sub-
marine outrages including the sink-
ing of the Lusitania are in perfect ac-
cordance with international law; that
our English language press is bribed

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
10:30 Address by Lieut. Kimball
7:30 Detroit Citadel Band

ahead of that of the allies; that Ger-
many is more democratic than Ameri-
ca; that President Wilson is more
autocratic than the kaiser; that the
kaiser is and always has been a peace-
angel in a war-mad world, and his
land was pounced upon unexpectedly
in the midst of profound peace; and
many other things of that bad ilk.
Not only could the citizens of Ameri-
ca not say these things "with perfect
justice," but out of a profound con-
viction of their falsity they repudiate
teem, and would be ashamed to be ac-

'Unitarian Church
State and Huron Streets
10:30-Wells' New Novel, "The Soul
of a Bishop," and its Criticism of
the Churches. Address by Rev. R.
S. Loring.
6:30-"The Effect of the War on
French Literature." Address by
Prof. Moritz Levi before the Stu-
dents' Society. The public invited.
counted capable of entertaining such
notions.
Mr. Helber offers his "files for in-
spection." They have been inspected,
and the government knows what was
in them. An enlightening comment is
the fact that Mr. Helber refuses to
have his paper on file in the Alumni
Reading room, as formerly. It made
it too convenient for "inspection" by
his "enemies."
JOHN WILLIAM SCHOLL.
Arcade Theatre opens tomorrow.--
Adv.

a

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Established 1848

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for Young Men

only.

Our fur-

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shoes and our
clothes are made
exclusvely for
Young Men.

I

For Young Men
HIRSH-WICKWIRE
Ready Clothes
JOHNSTON&MURPHY
Finest Shoes
We have the finest models of these
leading lines-models particularly
designed for Young Men.

|

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Someone remarked in the
stand that Yost now has three
terbacks.

south
quar-

Those three women in the north
stand went home early.
Dean Cooley says that two parties
cost a student $50. Evidently they are
small ones, for there are some which
run into the hundreds.
The kaiser has requisitioned door
knobs for ammunition. As soon as
we see them flying over the western
front we'll know it's time to turn and
push.
DID YOU BUY THAT BOND YES-
TERDAY?

The Munson Last Army Shoe

WAGNER & CO.
State Street at Liberty

by British capital and the munitions
makers, and the only unbiased news
is contained in the German journals;
that German civilization is generations

LET'S GO MICHIGAN!

Arcade Theatre opens tomorrow.-
Adv.

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