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April 03, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-03

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DAY AMDNIGHT1
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1918.

PRICE T

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)UNCIL SETS CAP
NIGHT FOR, MAY 31

.I

rI

Rush-
of

today in a
hadow the
ore terrible
rere hasten-
French and
1 announce-
these units
Allied war
)ifcials that
d be imme-
h vigorous
battle. The
for a count-
essive war-
the German
and hurled

cted that
r of the
tary offi-
the step
od. The
is to be
lay, not

ican inter-
aid, will be
I in coming
ns by hun-
play their

II

ry few of the highest
recisely what method
d to rush additional
e. Instead of an ex-
r General March, act-
ff, made public an or-
ary Baker, now in Eu-
hereafter that all in-
'ding the activities of
s overseas be central-
Pershing's hands.
artment will not give
ents relating to over-
ormation about troops
given out by the war
n the past.
IT CONCERT OF
BE GIVEN TODAY
etique concerto" and
storal symphony" will
University Symphony
e last concert in the
at 4:15 o'clock this
ill auditorium. Mrs.
1 will be piano soloist.

At a meeting of the student coun-
cil last night at the Union, April 26
was decided upon as the date to cele-
brate Swing Out. Campus election
day and the class games will occurr
on May 3 i and May 17th and 18th,
respectively. Cap Night will be held
the evening of May 31.
The matter as to whether or not
undergraduates should be admitted to
the membership of the council was
laid on the table for future action.
A committee consisting of Chairman
McClintock, and councilmen MacKen-
zie, Patterson, McWilliams and Ku-
era was appointed by President Hart
to find an appropriate substitute for
the annual push ball contest. The
next meeting of the council will be
held Tuesday, April 16.
PROBLEM OF BIG GUNS
DEAN COOLEY SAYS SUPPLEMENT-
ARY CHAMBERS MAY BE
SOLUTION
"I suppose if a 75-mile gun is pos-
sible, one to shoot 105 miles would be
but one step farther," said Dean Mor-
timer E. Cooley of the engineering
college, last night in referring to the
report' that the government is consid-
ering the construction of a great gun
having a range of 105 miles..
Muzzle Velocity is Question
"It is chiefly a question of muzzle
velocity," continued Dean Cooley,
"The greatest velocities with which
we are familiar are around 3,000 feet
per second, but a gun to shoot 100
miles would need to obtain a velocity
twice as great. This velocity could
perhaps be obtained by the use of sup-
plementary explosion chambers be-
tween the breach and the muzzle of
the gun. These chambers would give
the shell an added impetus before it
left the muzle of the piece.
Guns Very Expensive
"Another point to be considered in
the securing of long ranges is the
elevation ,to which the shell would
have to rise in order to cover the re-
quired distance. The theoretical angle
with the earth at which the greatest
distance is covered is 45 degrees. A
shell fired from the proposed gun,
tilted at this angle, would rise to a
height of 40 or 50 miles, far beyond
the layer of atmosphere which sur-
rounds the earth. Since there is no
resistance from the air at this height.
much more distance can be covered
than at lower levels.
"Such a gun would of course, be en-
ormously expensive to construct and
could not be fired more than 100 times
without being relined.
"If the government is going to start
building long range guns," conclud-
ed Dean Cooley, "my only wish is that
they will build one powerful enough
to fire from behind our lines and drop'
a few shells on the palace at Berlin."
LENROOT BACKERS
CLAIM LANDSLIDE,
Milwaukee, April 2.-Scattered re-
turns from 17 counties in today's
special senatorial election, while in-
sufficient to form the basis of a con-
vincing prediction, brought joy to the,
Republican leaders. For United States
senator reports showed:
.Irvine Lenroot, Republican, 4,673;
Joseph E. Davies, Democrat, 4,093;
Victor L. Berger, Socialist, 1,609. q

Lenroot supporters are claiming a
landslide for their candidate.
AVIATION SCHOOL ESTABLISHED,
AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIAt
In just one way the University of
California is doing more than we at1
Michigan according to President Harry
B. Hutchins. It has an aviation school
where men are sent to learn the theory
of flying. This is possible for Cal-;
ifornia because it has a large land
grant which affords ample space for
practice grounds. In all other war
activities the work being done is prac-
tically the same at both schools.
"Michigan has a few more boys drill-
ing," said the president, "but they
hoa ont + hnzt h same numbero f

COUNTY 1LOAN-QUOTA IS
FIXED AT $1,552,25
UNIVERSITY'S QUOTA OF BONDS
TO BE DETERMINED
LATER
The Washtenaw county quota for
the third Liberty Loan was fixed last
night at $1,552,295. During the sec-
ond loan the county was asked to
raise $2,422,875, or $870,580 more than
for the present bond issue. The quota
for Ann Arbor will be announced in
a day or so. The campus share will
be decided upon soon thereafter.
The University committee met last;
evening at the office of Prof. Clyde E.
Wilson of the engineering college,-di-
rector of student canvass .for men.
Preliminary plans for the conduct of
the campaign were discussed. The
captains and lieutenants for the stu-
dent teams were announced as fol-
lows:
Team' captains: Albert E. Horne,
'18; John D. Hibbard, '18E; F. H.
Tinsman, '18D; H. A. Knowlson, '18E;
and S. S. Atwood, '18E.
Lieutenants: Ward B. Sickler, '18E;
Robert T. Munro, '18, D. C. West,
'18E; J. P. McFarlen, '19E; C. T. Van
Dusen, '19E; E. L. Spanagel, '19E;
George A. Clark, '18E; Carlton R. Sa-
bin, '1E; Elbridge Dudley, '18E; A.
G. Gabriel, '18E; E. S. Larsen, '20;
RD. K. Mirrielees, '20M; J. I. McClin-
tock, '19; Alfred Mason, '19; J. R.
Reilly, '20.
The full personnel of the campus
teams will be announced before the
opening of the Easter vacation. The
teams will be instructed as to their
duties in order that they be ready to
start work for the campaign imme-
diately upon the re-opening of school.
The city committe will organize for
the drive at a dinner which is to be
held Friday evening at the city Y. M.
C. A. A number of teams have al-
ready been organized to open the drive
on April 6.
The campaign among the women
will be conducted by a special com-
'mittee, with Mrs. D. I. Quirk, Jr., of
Ypsilanti as chairman for the county.
Mrs. Fred McCumber of Ann Arbor is
chairman of the women's committee
for this city, and vice-chairman of he
county committee.
ENGINEERS ARE TO HAVE RANK
OF PRIVATES ON GRADUATION
Secretary L. A. Hopkins of the eng-
ineering college, has just received a
letter from Major General W. M.
Black, chief of engineers, U. S. A.,
concerning the status, after gradua-
tion, of men enlisted in the engineer-
ing reserve. Following is, General
Black's letter in part:
1. You are requested to call the
attention of your memfibers of the
engineer enlisted reserve corps to the
provisions of paragraph nine of thel
regulations governing enlistment by
engineering students in the engineer
branch of the enlisted reserve corps.
which gives to each student who has
enlisted in this corps, upon comple-
tion of his course or discontinuance
of the course for other reasons, the+
option of being discharged and return-'
ed to his former status in the draft, or
of being called into active service and
assigned to an engineer unit.
2. Unless this office is advised
promptly that a discharge is desir-
ed, the man will, upon leaving col-

lege, be called into active service.
The call will be in the grade of pri-
vate-not as a commissioned officer.
Subsequent promotions are obtained
through merit as vacancies, occur. 1
3. Please advise this office at onceA
of those members of the engineer en-1
listed reserve corps attending your in-
stitution, who will graduate this
spring, and the date of graduation. 1
4. It is expected that this office
will be advised whenever a member of
the corps leaves college or does notr
maintain the standard set for initial1
enlistment.
Stick By President Says Dean Cooley
"Kid-glove fighters and swivel-,
chair officers may be criticized a lot,"
said Dean Mortimer R. Cooley yes-
terday, "but I believe this is the time
to stick by the President and let himJ
decide such matters. If he thinks
those men are all right, it is not for

TASK SHIP COMPANIES FOR
OUTPUT DURING MARCH
Washington, April 2. - American
shipbuilders were called upon tonight
to explain why their output for March
fell behind schedule.
Chairman -Hurley, of the shipping
board, and General Manager Piez, of
the emergency fleet corporation, tele-
graphed the managements of all the
yards in the United States saying
they were "keenly disappointed" in
the tonnage delivered and placing the
responsibility of turning out ships
squarely on the men in control of ac-
tual building -operations.
The telegram said in part: "Money,
material and men have been supplied
without stint by the nation. The Am-
erican people want ships, not ex-
cuses."
Suggestions were requested and the
officials said they wanted to know if
the fault lay with the emergency
fleet corporation. The managers were
asked if their forces were doing a full
day's work and if it was planned to
run a night shift.
TORPEDOED CELTIC
REACHES PORT SAFE
New York, April 2.-The big White
Star line ship Celtic which was tor-
pedoed a day or two ago while on a*
voyage to the United States has
reached a British port safely.i
Information that the Celtic had been
a victimn of submarine attack was
received here yesterday but no details
other than that efforts were being
made to save her from sinking were
reported. The Celtic is a vessel of
more than 20,000 tons and her des-
truction would have been equivalent
to the loss of half a dozen vessels
such as ordinarily fall victim to Ger-
man submarines.
QUESTIONNAIRES SHOW GERMAN
COURSES SLUMP IN SCHOOLS
"German courses in the schools have
taken, and will continue to take, a
decided slump," said Professor C. 0.
Davis of the department of education
in his lecture yesterday.
Professor Davis stated that he sent
questionnaires to 200 schools of the
state and 166 replies showed that the
German language was not elected by
a single student, neither this semester
or last, in the Battle Creek high
school; that 12 schools have already
{abolished it from their curriculum and
30 more are intending to drop it at
the end of the present school year.
(French and Spanish are being elected
in the place of German and many
schools are introducing new courses
in agriculture and commercial bran-
ches.
"Teachers will be required to main-
tain new and more effective standards
of education after the war," continued
Professor Davis, "and this will call for
a better type of teacher."
Senate Adjourns in Draft Discussion
Washington, April 2.-With a view
to expediting passage of the senate
resolution basing the draft on the
number of registrants in class one in-
stead of on population, administration
leaders today attempted to have the
house adopt a special rule limiting
debate on the measure to three hours,
but a point of no question was made
and the house adjourned.
The resolution will be brought in the

house Thursday unless leaders should
decide tomorrow to undertake to have
it made the special order at once.
Chairman Pou told the house today
that the resolution was vital to the
war department's plans for the next
draft call.
'Amazons Rehearsal
There will be a rehearsal of the
Amazons, act 1, from 4 to 6 o'clock in
,Sarah Caswell Angell hall. At 4
o'clock Youatt, Gastlejordan and
Miuchin will report, at 4:30 Billy and
Tommy, and at 5 o'clock Noeline, Lit-
terly, Twernways, and De Trival.

WANT SHIPS, NOT EXCUSES
SOFFICIALS TELL, BUILDERS

('11 IRMAN

HURLEY TAKES TOI

CADETS INSPECTED
BY ARMY OFFICER
Cadets in Michigan's reserve of-
ficers' training corps were informally
inspected at 4:15 o'clock yesterday af-
ternoon for the first time, by Major
Max G. Garber, of the United States
army.
The men formed in front of Hill
auditorium and marched down to
Ferry field. About one half of the
members of the R. 0. T. C. band ap-
peared on the field, shortly after the
cadets entered thegrounds, and took
their post in the center of the field.
While the band played "Varsity,"
"The Victors," and military airs, the
companies went thorugh closeorder
drill until 5:30 o'clock. Major Barber
and Lieut. George C. Mullen inform-
ally inspected the cadets on the drill
grounds.
After the drills, .the cadets formed
in a column of squads behind the band
and marched up State street. The
companies were dismissed opposite
the auditorium. Nearly all the men
were in regulation uniforms.
"The men went through the drills
in an excellent manner," said Lieuten-
ant Mullen last night. "Although there
were a few imperfections, the cadets
are showing improvement."
"They did very well," commented
Lieut. Losey J. Williams last night.
Immediately after the inspection,
Major Garber left the city on the 6
o'clock train. He inspected several
schools in Detroit Tuesday.
WORK IN FIELDS TOO
HARD FOR, AVERAGE GIRL
DR. THOMPSON BELIEVES FARM
ERETTE SHOULD DEVOTE
TIME TO DAIRY WORK
"I don't really believe the girls who.
go into the fields to work can accom-
plish a great deal," said Dr. W. S.
Thompson, instructor in sociology,
yesterday. "I am afraid they will find
that farm work is, after all, a kind of
technical work, and calls for more
skilled labor than they think. Much
of the farm work is entirely too heavy
for the average girl."
Dr. Thompson stated that he believ-
ed the farmerette "could employ her
time more advantageously in assist-
ing with gardening, poultry raising,
and dairy work as these lines do not
require so much strength. - Much
work needs to be done along lines of
food conservation. Girls chould do
much to assist during the canning sea-
son in preparing and preserving vege-
tables and fruits. They would be
much more efficient in these lines of
work than in the real raising of
crops.
Dr. H. W. Emerson of the medical
faculty stated yesterday, however,
that the majority of girls are capable
of doing more work than they think
they can. As there is such an urgent
need for as much food as possible to
be produced this summer, girls can
accomplish splendid results. Modern
machinery eliminates unnecessary
work on the farm, and with the right
kind of girls co-operating, summer
crops would be larger. Care would
have to be taken in not working a
delicate girl too hard, he said.
Extensive Rationing Done in England
London, April 2.-Some idea of the

work which rationing has entailed inE
London may be gathered from the fact
that in the borough of Islington, the
most populous of the 30 odd London
subdivisions, more than 656,000 ra-
tioning cards were issued. These
provide for a population of 328,000,
including .85,000 separate households
living in 50,000 houses.
The 180 butchers of the borough
have been organized into a single
compact association for co-operative
buying.-
Collect Senior Class Dues Today
Senior class dues will be collected
for the last time from 10 o'clock to 3
o'clock today in University hall. Dues
must -be paid before graduation.
Orders for caps and gowns are not
being given as promptly as they
should. Dealers say that an unusual-
ly small number of orders are being
given and all transactions must be
finished by spring vactions.
Senio anes_ to n n ma h rsa arl!

EFFORTS TOM8
FRENCH AND BRITISH
TAKE INITIATIVE IN A
i ON TUESDAY
TURN IN BATTL
EXPECTED A'
Teuton Prisoners Report C
Are Reduced to 40 lX
During Drive
Paris, April 2.-Enemy a
successfully attempted e
morning to bomb Paris but
able to penetrate the defei
rage. Some bombs were d
the suburbs but there wer
ualties.
London, April 2.-The re
Field Marshal Haig's headqi
night in France states as f
"Except for minor enterpr
we carried out in the neigh
Serre and as a result of whi
tured a German post the d
more quietly on the wh
front."
Berlin, via London, April
my counter attacks near Heb
against the heights eatmr
between the Luce and the A
the report from general he
today, "broke down with b
ses."
(By Associated Pres
April 2.-With the passi
thirteenth day of the new bs
Somme there came increal
ence that the great Germa
with which the Teutons i
crush the Allied line has
terly spent itself.
Where previously the Gel
thrown men into the fray,
ing the immense numbers o
wounded, Tuesday saw the
anywhere to give battle. O:
trary, in what little fighting
the British and French troo
initiative.
Expect Crisis Reach
Thus, it seems apparent
reserve forces of the ente
ally intact and with thead
General Pershing's troops
them, the turn in the tide c
tie is at hand.
While both the French a'
armies have suffered rath
casualties as they stood v
their task of impeding the
and making them pay an t
price for every foot of grot
their reserves have been
with the .utmost care behin
for the fateful time when t
ing fire of the Allied gun
chine guns should have s
the German hordes as to b
equality in strength to th
forces.
Americans Strong
All along, the British ai
commanders have not . le]
their calculations that sta
of Americans, exceeding 10
who are now fully trained a
ped and anxiouis to lend ti
the task of defeating the G(
Daily the German losses i

ed or wounded continue tc
as details are obtained from
mans made prisoners.Some
lost as high as 70 per cenl
effectives as they charged in
mation against the British a
machine gunners and riflem
panies withdrew from the
with their combative stre
duced to 40 men.
No Important Chani
The latest accounts of the
from the various war offices

Appear in
-The first

co

own of Aubin has
e and it is expect-
r towns and cities
ro card will be de--
nder sixteen years
on is made for wo-
een a shortage of
during the last

.e School of Music
a work gave a dem-
eir work yesterday
sium. Their program
ing, marching, drill-
;ames and dances.
aking part, attended

important new
front. Only
place on that
south of Arra
and little asid
occurred bettw
Germans on
line. The fig
guns was par

ope

to criticize them.

PresidentI

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