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March 31, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 19

Relative Advance
From 1914 to 1918
The average advance of woolen and worsted fabrics and Trimmings
has been
17570
This information is authentic and based on present market costs.
National Woolens and Trimmings Association.
We have protected ourselves and trade by buying early. We now
have on hand four hundred yards of blues and blacks, as well as many
beautiful staple fancy suitings that were bought before the heavy ad-
vance. ARE YOU INTERESTED$ Come in and look them over.
Liberty Bonds are good here in lieu of cash.

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WHAT'S GOING ON

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J. K. MALCOLM

EAST LIBERTY STREET

MALCOLM BLOCK

DON'T EAT WHEAT UNTIL
AFTER HARVEST-HOOER

HAWARINS AS PATRIOTIC
AS CITIZENS OF STATES'

TODAY
12 o'clock-Prof. T. E. Rankin
speaks at the Methodist church.
3 o'clock--Mixer at the MichiganI
Union.
4 o'clock-Bible class meets at 4441
South State street.
6 o'clock--Young Peoples' society
meets at the Presbyterian churcn.
7:30 o'clock-Mr. G. E. Macilwain
speaks at the Methodist church on
"War and Labor."
6:30 o'clock-Dr. Clyde B. Stouffer
of the health service speaks at the
Congregational church.
6:30 o'clock-H. G. King, grad.,
speaks on "China" at the Methodist:
church.
U-NOTICES
The All-fresh Glee club will meet
at 2 o'clock today at the School of
Music. The club will sing at the Un-
ion at the Union mixer at 3 o'clock.
The Varsity Mandolin club will re.
hearse at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in
University Hall.
-Senior Engineers! Be sure to sign!
up for your engraved card invitations'
In the Engineering society rooms
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.
Rehearsals for "Miss Hobbs" will
be held at 9 o'clock today in Univer-
sity hall, and at 7 o'clock Monday
night in the Alpha Nu rooms.
Buy your alarm clocks at J. L
Chapman's, Jeweler. 113 8. Main
There is always an opportunity to
Increase your business through Daily
advertising. Try it.-Adv.

Realize
when you buy shoes of
duality youbalways pay
a little more-but the
time between "whecn"
is what makes quality
ant economy.
Think This Over-
The wealthy are the on-
ly ones who can afford
to buy "cheap" foot-
wear-because it costs
more in the long walk.
The Truth Is?
We thave a reputation
for catering' to the bet-
ter dressed. The truth
is, they, are better
dressed because we
cater to them.
Another Truth-
The style of a shoe
will last as long as the
shoe looks good. That's
why quality shoes re-
main sty lish-their ap-
pearance lasts
Alfred J. Ruby
INCORPORATED

GET YOUR
Text Books and Su ples
From the "Store with the College Spirit"
Sheehan & Co.
Ann Arbor Detroit

CORN

PRODUCTS MUST SERVE
UNTIL NEW SUPPLY
IS THRESHED

ISLANDS
IN

SHOW GREAT SPIRIT
ADVANCING WAR
MEASURES

Attention, Boy
CLAUDE BROWN, the Old Cloth

hes Man

Your old Suits, Coats, Pants, and Shoes will bring you
a fair price at 210 Hoover Ave. Phone 2601 One door
west of Hoover Factory

Two recent orders of the govern-
ment show the necessity for conserv-
ing the supply of wheat, and at the
same time, of consuming the more
abundant articles.
The national food administration,
by suspending the meatless day regu-
lations for a period of 30 days, and
by ordering bakers to discontinue the
use of unauthorized substitutes in
the making of Victory bread, has ex-
pressed the extreme need of wheat
products among the Allies.
Hotel managers from all parts of
the country have pledged themselves
to eliminate wheat, and wheat pro-
ducts, from their menus as a result
of the food administrator's request.
Mr. Hoover said, "Every independent,
every well-to-do person in the United
States should abstain from wheat en-
tirely until the next harvest."
On the other hand, the government
requests that more corn and pota-
toes be consumed. The 1917 potato
crop has been so large, and the de-
mand relatively small that farmers
have found it necessary to feed large
quantities of potatoes to their stock.
All corn and corn products should
take the place of wheat.

That Hawaiian patriotism is as in-
tense at present as that within the
United States, is evidenced by the fine
manner in which that territory is co-
operating in all war measures. Food
ipledge drives and conservation cam-
paigns are being pushed as vigorous-
ly as in any of the states. More than
100 cases of Red Cross supplies were
sent to Europe from the islands dur-
ing January and February of this
year.
On one of the smaller islands, Mol-
okai, a leper colony is located. These
lepers, wishing to give evidence of
their patriotism, have raised a fund of
$250 which they have asked the Amer-
ican Red Cross to use for relief of suf-
fering in Europe.
Washington's birthday is always
commemorated with much zeal in the
various towns in the territory. This
year in many places the day was
marked by fairs and bazaars, the re-
ceipts being used for patriotic war
purposes.
In Honolulu the day was celebrated

NICKELS
ARCADE

IN DETROIT
l01 Washington Blved.

Do your 1it-dance at Armory, April
2-benefit Co. I.-Adv.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. i. Chapman'.
is the place. 113 S. Main.-Adv.

U

/

CLAUDE H. BROWN,

210 E. Hoover Ave.

1.12 % Increase
over last March

BISCHOFF

For Your

Easter

Plants and Flowers

MILITARY NEWS

GEORGE J. BISCHOFF

...Florist..

220 Chapin Street

Phone 809-M

FLORIST

I

MILITARY WATCHES

We have a complete line
without luminous dials.

of Military Watches, with or

Here you will find a complete assortment of makes priced
lower than elsewhere.
Hamiltons, Elgins, Walthams, Swiss and Ingersoll.

I

Capt. Harold M. Reeves, ex-'18, has
recently been ordered to San Antonio,
Tex., according to information receiv-
ed yesterday. Reeves was formerly
located at Indianapolis.
Arthur M. Grant, '20, Benzonia, has
been rejected for service after three
operations. Grant left the University
three months ago to enlist in De-
troit, where he was rejected because
of a physical defect which could be
corrected by an operation. Another
physical defect was discovered at the
second enlistment examination. He
was again operated on, but he failed to
pass another examination. Grant then
attempted a third operation. In-
flammatory rheumatism set in, due to
his weakened condition, after the last
operation. He is recovering. Grant is
a member of company L, First regi-
ment, R. 0. T. C.
Charles F. Lambert, ex-'19, acting
adjutant of the First regiment, will
leave for Detroit this afternoon, where
he will report for active duty in the
United States naval reserves tomor-
row morning.
First sergeants in the second battal-
ion, Second regiment, will instruct the
cadets of their companies in sighting
bar exercises at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon in Waterman gynmasium.
Cadets in the first battalion of the
First regiment will be given the fol-
lowing athletic and gymnastic con-
tests at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in Waterman gymnasium:
First regiment-Companies A and B,
two-mile, buck, tumbling, high jump;
companies B and C, wrestling, hori-
zontal bars, rope climbing, sprinting.
The entire battalion will be given
setting up exercises after the con-
tests.
Speakers Address Loan Meetings
Prominent speakers of Ann Arbor,
are addressing Liberty Loan meetings
in various nearby cities and towns.
County Prosecuting Attorney Carl A.
Lehman, spoke on the subject of the
Liberty Loan Friday night, at a meet-
ing the citizens in Salemn.
The Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas and
Clarence Johnson addressed a similar
meeting in Dexter. R. K. Immel spoke
at a meeting in Saline.

by a great military parade composed
of regulars, militia men, boy scouts
and school cadets.
Another undertaking on the Hawai-
ian Islands is the movement for edu-
cation in American citizenship which
was inaugurated about a year ago.
The aim is to educate the natives in
order that they may take out citizen-
ship papers, and the education of.
young foreigners who by right of their
birth in Hawaii will be come citizens
when they are of age. It is said that
the movement has met with splendid
success so far.
Millen-Potter Case Is Dismissed
The case of Homer C. Millen against
Nathan Potter of the Portland Cement
company, which was taken to the sup-
reme court on an appeal from the cir-
cuit court, was settled Friday. The
bill of complaint was dismissed, decid-
ed in favor of Mr. Potter. Mr. and
Mrs. Millen sued Potter for $300,000,
involving an accounting in the Mich-
igan Portland Cement company.
Class Dancing Monday and Thurs-
day evenings at the Packard.-Adv.

A Always send Betsy Ross-the finest candies in Michigan.]

{:.

WA

"Meddling With
Junior Girls' Play

Mars

Betsy Ross Candy Shop-

Machine Gun Co.,
331st Regiment,
Camp Sherman, Ohio,
March 28, 1918.

Enclosed find $... . for which put me up a box of candy
(fruit and nut assortment) and deliver to .... Forest Ave.
I have yet to find a product that comes up to Betsy Ross
Candy. and that is why I am sending you the order.
C. C. D.-'18E.

Cycles

Price 75c

Here's the Reason

MICHIGAN UNION OPERA

;.

ARNOLD AND COMPANY
JEWELERS
220 8. MAIN ST.

"Let's

Go!"

lq

Scores $2.00

i

FR ATER NITI ES

11

April Victor Records

On Sale April 1 st

Arrange for Your

GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS

Unsurpassed Accommodations

-'U

1ftntversitgtltflswc

1b~ousc

4

601 East William Street

948-W

619 E. LIBERTY

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