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March 30, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


F

a4

L

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1918.

F 1

lATE APPRO VS
R EXTENSION
tlion to Include Men Reaching
Age of 21 Since June .,
1917 Passed
IED THAT 700,000 MEN
WILL BE ADDED THIS YE AR

Chamber Rejects Proposal
equire Training of Boys
From 19 to 21.

to

ees

shington, Marci-29.-The reso-
n extending the selective draft to
reaching the age of 21 years since
5, 1917, was passed tonight by
senate without a record, after a
attempt had been made to add
a provision for training youths
19 to 21 years old.
is estimated that about 700,000
will be added to the registration
year by the resolution. This is
>f the pieces of legislation upon
h the war department is waiting
e announcing complete plans for
next draft. It now goes to, the
e for consideration with the bill
se draft quotas on the number of
trants in class 1, instead of on

NEED 250,000 BOYS
TO HELP FARMERS
Enrollment of 250,000 boys over 16,
years old to aid the farmers in pro-
ducing record-breaking crops this
year is the aim of the Boys' Working
reserve, according to the assistant
national director, Mr H. W. Wells,
who was in Ann Arbor yesterday.
"These boys," Mr. Wells stated,
"comprise the country's greatest un-
tapped source of labor, and their ser-
vice in the furrows is secondary only
to that in the trenches.
The boys are placed as near home
as possible, the farms first being in-
spected to determine their fitness as a
place of training for the young labor-
ers. Plans are being made for the so-
cial welfare of the amateur agricul-
turists in order that spare time will
not hang too heavily on their hands.
Many Boys Engaged in Work
Last year between 80,000 and 100,-
000 boys were engaged in this work,
although the organization ' of the
movement was complete in only a few
states. The success of the plan is
evidenced by the testimony of one
director that two-thirds of his last
year's workers have re-enrolled this
year, the great majority of whom will
work for their former employers.
Duty of Boys at Home
"If the war* is to be won it must be
through the efforts of boys under 21
years of age in the fighting' fallows
of the fields at home, as their older
brothers are fighting in the trenches
of Belgium and France," said Mr.
Wells, before the Schoolmasters' club

ENEMY OFFI
LOCAL ATI
BERLIN

'*
*

* * * * * *-
Let-up on Meatless
Washington, Mar. 29.-
sion of the meatless day
tions for 30 days begin
morrow, was ordered to
the food administration
structions telegraphed to
food administrators.

* * * * * * * *

WAR UEPATMENT
TO CLA.

Day

J:

[

I1

STEPS MUST B]
DIATELY OR TI
NO SUNK1i
University milita
still puzzled at the
department official
The R. O. T. C. ti
versity has as yet
and unlers definite
mediately in this d
be no military train
city this summer.
rlf" m d~' n r^.^ m

'AlEN LiIE.
IE WILL BE
CAMP

if

bee:

Thi
boys

I to require training of
19 and 21 was in the
mdment which the sen-
to 26.
debate Senator Kirby
nittee member, predict-
'0 men would be in th
)0,000 in camps before

RANGE GUN
GOOD FRIDAY
eventy-five per-
' 90 wounded,
n and children,
a German long
iurch in the re-
ood Friday ser-
according to an
n issued this

yesterday. t*'ai
Corn Still Luhusked cour
Mr. Wells told of great cornfields only
all over the country, where last year's edl
corn still lay unhusked because of the terid
lack of farm labor. He said it was up plat
to the boys between the ages of 16 visi
and 21 to enlist their services on the stat
farms for the spring harvest, and up H
,to the schoolmasters to -arrange It so "1
that the boys could be spared from adji
the classrooms. ing
"These boys are ,our second line of ed
defense," said Mr. Wells. "Unless "Th
this army behind the army is organ- quit
ized, the world is going to be short of and
food, and our chances for winning the cove
war are to be jeopardized." He said stud'
that every boy of seven or over in
Germany is a producer. Tb
the(
stud
Alaskan Volcanicofm
Region Pictredtren
. Rd$$$ ffd variE
vane
"Katmai and the Ten Thousand ing,

nior divis
'ding to a
ut. Losey

An

church was struck by a
the celebration of High
tnday and many casual-
ESERVISTS ADVISED
DEFECTS REMEDIED

ne of the courses
-which are in the s
for the advanced c
Work Intensive
advance course desi
3ial statement is tha
s in the third and fo
ary training. The wi
intensive and trea

TO
Med

traitsP

who were al-
ough possessing
fects, have been
deficiencies re-
mmer of 1918 for
Df these is that
of abolishing,
in professional

ma
for

tain the This advice came in a letter from
the surgeon general's office and was
signed by F. C. Waite, captain of ,the
tablished sanitary corps, N. E. The other four
ldren of reasons given are as follows: First,
oys are the desirability of having a surgical
re shown operation precede entrance into .ac-
tive service as long as possible; sec-
fthe Al- ond, surgeons will be more and more
work of busy during the ensuing summer;
aid Mrs. third, rooms at hospitals will be at a
supplies premium; fourth, military necessity
and the may result in the calling of medical
pend on reservists sooner than is expected at
ported to present.

suc

rnmittees as
n, "depends
over from A
of the .war

LEADING HOTELS
R WHEAT PROIUCTS

w7

Washington, March 29.-Wheat pro-
ducts were wiped off the menus of
EODAY several hundred of the country's lead-
ing hotels today in response to a re-
e toast- quest of the food administration that
lunch- "every independent, every well-to-do
day in person in the United States" should
Dever- pledge complete abstinence from
wheat until the next harvest in order
affair to supply the entire needs of the Al-
ill act lies.
Hotel managers who had come from
lunch- every state in the union to hear new
ean of conservation regulations explained,
H. W. were told by Food Administrator
Over Hoover that the need for wheat was
o'clock even greater now than when the reg-
e sale ulations were promulgated.
one. Mr. Hoover said the renunciation
at the of luxurious foods must begin at the
sium. top of the social scale.
ved by
Junior Miami Not to Dismiss Men Early
en pol- Miami men will not be dismissed early
l prob- this spring for service on farms, ac-
it first cording' to the statement made by

Smokes" was the subject of a lecture
delivered in Hill auditorium last night
by Prof. Robert F. Bribgs, of the bot-
anical department of Ohio State uni-
versity.
In 1913, Professor Griggs visited the
Katmai peninsula and mountain to
study the true nature of the disturb-
ances which occurred there in 1912.
Since then he has made three expedi-
tions to the same region under the au-
spices of the National Geographic so-
ciety.
In describing the mountain proper,
he declared that its eruption in 1912
had been so violent ass to deposit ash-
es to a depth of 15 feet in Kodiak, a
town some 100 miles distant from Mt.
Katmai. The crater of this volcano
was found to be 3,700 fewt deep and
three miles in diameter, and the whole
of it was filled with a brilliant blue]
lake of boiling water.
tProbably the most important dis-
covery made by any of the parties was
that of the valley of "Ten Thousand]
Smokes" upon which the explorers
stumbled while looking for the source
of great clouds of steam which they
had seen from a distance. Here, on
a broad and almost level plain lying
between gigantic mountains, were
tens of thousands of small craters em-
itting steam, which rose to a height
of 500 feet.
Slides depicting the beauty of the
country about Katmai and the volcano
itself were shown during the lecture.
, Take Over C(ermian Owned Mills
Washington, March 29.-Six great
I German owned New Jersey woollen
mills, with, a total valuation of more
than $70,000,000 have been taken over
by the alien property cdstodian, who
has named governing boards of direc-
tors to assume control of them. The

regulations, to
martial procee
manual for
tional relation
discovery to th
growth of and
tional law eml
lomacy, legislE
chology of wa:
strategy, and n
icy.

.ties

Sumnuer Camp in 1920
By applying general orders number
49, there will be no summer camp
near here until 1920, unless the sys-
tem is changed by the war authorities
at ,Washington, or by some possible
action of the military officials at the
University.
The course was prescribed on Sept.
4, 1916, and since it is imperative that
each university or institution of learn-
ing, which adopted military training
in that year, give the students a firm
foundation of two years instruction in
the basic course, the action of the
war department will determine wheth-
er they will be allowed to have a mili-
tary camp this summer.
MR. CHARLES MOORE TO GIVE

y history

"Washington, the P
the title of a lecture
Mr. Charles Moore, c
o'clock Monday eveni
school auditorium.
views, said to'be unus

City" is
given by

s -

war wi
f-', fh

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