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March 29, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

..A

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Store

ANN ARBOR STEAM
DYE WORKS
Established 1887

,

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CITY PRICES.
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO
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EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality" "
If it's not right we make it right
- PHONE 273 -

It

200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor

117 Ptarl
Ypsilanti

tulLIblLIl 11111 4.1111'1
TU NIT TITES WHET
WILL SEND SURPLUS PROVIDED
EQUIVALENT ,AMOUNT IS
GIVEN ALLIES
Sydney, Australia, March 28.-Aus-
tralia has 150,000,000 bushels of sur-
pius wheat which she wants to ship
to the United States and Canada with
the understanding that an equivalent
amount of American wheat shall be
shipped from America to Europe for
the use of the people of the Entente
nations.
Australia's offer is due to the fact
that there is not sufficient shipping
available to enable the Australian
government to ship its wheat surplus
direct to England.
Can U. S. Supply Ships?
The chief question is whether the
United States can supply the shipping
to carry the wheat from Australia to
Pacific = Coast ports. The suggestion
has been received from the united Stat-
es that Japanese shipping be utilized
to carry the wheat direct from Aus-
tralia to England, but it is declared
that even if the Japanese ships were
available for that purpose, they would
be unable to carry all Australia's sur-
plus.
1918 Wheat Insufficient
Decision to appeal to the British
government to obtain American ship-
ping for transportation of Australian
wheat to the United States was taken
up at a conference held here last
week. It has been proposed that the
production of wheat in New South
Wares should be reduced. James Pat-
ten of Chicago, was asked his opinion
and replied that he thought the crop
of 1918 and 1919 would be insufficient
to supply the world's demands.
"Advise increasing production every-
where possible," cabled Mr. Patten.
In advocating the plan of sending
Australian wheat to America, G. W.
Walker, the government wheat, ship-
per, said he believed this would open
a way to make 150,000,000' bushels of
wheat available for the American pub-
lic.
STRACCIARI TO SING
AT SPRING FESTIVAL
Riccardo Stracciari, the Italian
baritone, will make his first appear-
ance in the United States outside of
Chicago and New York in the Wed-
nesday evening concert of the May
festival.
Stracciari, the son of a famous
sculptor was born in Bologna, Italy.
He graduated from the Institute Al-
dini Valeriani for Arts and Trades as
an electro-technical engineer. In-
stead of following the career of an
engineer he entered the Bologna con-
servatorium of music to study voice.
Many honors have been showered
upon Stracciari who is a Knight Com-
mander of the Order of the Crown of
Italy, also of the Order of Isabella
Cattolica of Spain, and a Chevalier of
the Crocede Christo of Portugal, and
has the Academiques de la France.
Karleton Hackett of the Chicago
Post says of Stracciari: "He never
loses his sense of proportion, and
there is in his biggest moments the
feeling of reserve of power that is
essential to all great art. He is an
artist of .rare quality, one of the few
who give the feeling of genuine pas-
sion."
LIFE MEMBERSHIP IN UNION
TO COST $100 AFTER APRIL 1

Union life membership subscrip-
tions will cost $100 after April 1, ex-
cept to students in their last year of
residence at the University and to
graduates of not more than one year's
standing.
This change of fees from $50 to
$100, and the limitations placed on the
sale of life memberships are in ac-
cordance with a provision of the new
Union constitution which was passed
Dec. 14, 1917.f
The Union has received lately sev-
eral $50 Liberty bonds in payment of,
life membership subscriptions. Hom-
er Heath, '07, general secretary of the
Union, announces that bonds are very
acceptable as payments.
U. of M. Jewelry. a." Chapman'
Le tne place. 113 . MaLn.--AA'v.

For the first time this semester the
R. 0. T. C. band of 125 members ac-
companied the cadets in the two regi-
ments, except the companies of the
first battalion of the Second regiment,
and the second battalion of the First
regiment, yesterday afternoon down
State street to Ferry field.
The members of the band wore the
new uniforms. Hundreds of specta-
tors, together with those attending
the Schoolmasters' club convention,
watched the cadets as they marched
down State street.
,First sergeants in the following bat-
talions will instruct the cadets in
their companies in sighting bar exer-
cises at 4:15 o'clock in Waterman
gymnasium:
First battalion, First regiment, this
afternoon; second battalion, Seond
regiment, Monday afternoon; and sec-
ond battalion, First reginent, Tulesday
afternoon.
Dr. George A. May will give the fol-
lowing athletic and gymnastic contests
to the cadets in the second battalion
of the Second regiment at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon in Waterman gymnas-
ium:
KSecond regiment-Companies I and
K, two-mile, buck, tumbling, high
jump; companies L and M, wrestling,
horizontal bars, rope climbing, sprint-
ing.
Three one-minute rounds of shadow
boxing, with one-minute rests, will be
given to the entire battalion after the
contests.
CUSTER SOLDIERS TO HEAR
LECTURES BY PROFESSORS
A series of lectures at the Camp
Custer cantonment by professors from
the University of Michigan has been
arranged for by the army Y. M. C. A.
The purpose of the lectures is to
broaden the knowledge of the soldiers
upon the topics of international inter-
est.
Past lectures have been well at-
tended. Prof. ;William L. Schurtz, in-
structor of Latin-American history
and institutions, spoke some time ago
on "The Geography of the Warring
Countries." Since that time, Profes-
sor Schurtz has repeated his lectures
several time at various Y. M. C. A.
huts.
Beginning April 1, the course will
be resumed at the rate of one topic a
week. The program is as follows:
"What the British Empire Stands
For," by Prof. Arthur L. Cross; "The
Growth .of Germany and of German
Ambition," by Prof. William A. Fray-
er; "How the War Stated and How it
Developed," by Prof. Edward R.
Turner; "American Democracy and
the War," by Prof. Earle W. Dow;
and "What the French Republic
Stands For," by Prof. Jonathan F.
Scott. Each program will- be follow-
ed by other entertainments.
ANN ARBOR PEOPLE CONSERVE
WHEAT, SAYS LOCAL BAKER
Ann Arbor bakers claim that people
are conserving wheat as a result of
the recent order by Food Administrat-'
or Prescott, of Michigan.
Recent sales of bread, although
showing no decrease, prove that there
has .been a relative decline in the con-
sumption of wheat. People are buy-
ing bread in the same quantities, but
the amount of substitutes now used,
has diminished the quantity of wheat
consumed.
In addition to this, it is thought that
people are no longer baking bread in

their homes as formerly. According
to government orders, it is necessary
that 50 per cent of the substitutes be
given with every sale of wheat, and
as there is very little demand for sub-
stitutes in the homes, there has been
a larger demand for bread from the
bakers. Although bakers are doing
practically the same amount of busi-
ness now as before, yet it is generally
thought that most people are con-
forming to the request of Mr. Pres-
cott.

MILITARY

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vice

'21E'S MAY FINISH COURSE IN
TWO YEARS UNDER NEW PLAN
"If the plans for the new summer
session in the engineering college are
adopted, it will be possible for present

.. ,

Fountain Pens
Waterman
and ConKlin

TRUBEY'S
218 S. Main Street
in order to be able to make the ear-
lier train for his home.
Dr. Quinter O. Gilbert read a paper
on "Blod Transfusion as a Therape-
utic Measure." Refreshment followed
the business meeting.
Cecil Corbin, '17, Home on Furlough
Cecil Corbin, '17, who was severely
injured while training for air ser-
vice at Fort Worth, Texas; will arrive
in Alpena Sunday on a three months'
furlough.
Corbin sutsained several broken
bones and was badly burned about the
face and eyes but is recovering his

ANS

parts of1
ling of the
il society
Sigma Nu

E

of the
; and 4

a]

freshmen in the college to complete
the course in two years and two sum-j
mer sessions," declared Dean Morti-
'iner E. Cooley of the engineering col-
lege yesterday morning at the junior
assembly in the engineering building.
The proposed summer session will
extend from July 1 to Sept. 29 and
will yield 12 to 14 hours credit in-
stead of eight or nine hours as for-
merly. According to Dean Cooley, the
'lengthened summer term may become
a permanent feature of 'the war and
evolve into part of a continuous
course such as is now given at the
University of Chicago. Following
Dean Cooley, Prof. A. E. Boak, of the
history department explained the
military situation in Italy to the en-
gineers.
S. C. Zylstra was elected student
,councilman to succeed R. D. Smith,
'19E, who has entered the service.
ANN ARBOR BUSINESS MEN
ENCOURAGE THRIFT CLUBS
At a meeting of the Ann Arbor bus-
iness men Wednesday .night, a large
committee was appointed to encour-
age the formation of Thrift clubs in
various parts of the city.. These clubs
are to be composed of people who
have pledged to purchase Thrift
stamps regularly.
It is the opinion of the business men
that the Thrift stamp sales can be
made much larger by united and per-
sistent effort. Many plans were form-
UlaV t d fnrl VL .J io

Al

Good Lunches
loc a
Chinese and Am(
Shor
Michigan 1Inn
I SHORTHAI

F, MA
E. William

Style

Major Lew-
work at
nonth, and
he closing
ted orders
s forced to

in college Corbin was an ac-
ck man and a member of the
I fraternity.

BOOK

There is always an opportunity to
increase your business through Daily

Classes Just Stir

the

; advertfging. Try it.-Adv.

I

Leave Cop!s-
at
Students'
Supply Store

Dancing Friday and Saturday-
at the Armory.-Adv.

nightsI

'LOST
LOST-In U. of M. Hall Wednesday
night, small pair of Cameo pins.
Connected by chain. Reward. Mrs.
Soule, 708 S. University Ave.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT - Steam heated flat, 5
rooms and bath. Apply Apartment
No. 6, 613 S. Thayer St. Phone

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
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