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March 28, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-28

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w 3anlYt

I

DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

V

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1918.

PRICE THE

I

ER

11 1

U

WAR

rat, Accuses
Polities

Press)
27.-The

big-

each between demo-
licans in the Senate
egan developed today
,te which followed a
or Jones, republican,
,ttacking the shipping
:izing President Wil-
ward congress.
mns, democrat, of Mis-
. the republicans of
in behalf of Repre-
>t, candidate for the
consin. This aroused
and leaders of both
amber joined in the
moot, republican from
an address he had
norrow, charging the
f with using his high

ren

t the clash to a
ewed tomorrow.
in to commence
Lion of the Over-
the president's
government de-
ken.
ator Jones de-
n Hurley of the
misleading, and
nes are sinking
as they can be

MEATLESS DAY IS
TAKEN OFF MENU
In order that wheat consumption
be materially cut down to conform to
the sweeping regulations received
here Saturday by Food Administrator
Prescott, Mr. A. D. Groves, food ad-
ministrator for Washtenaw county,
has received the following telegram
from the federal authorities: "No
restrictions on the sale of meats on
Tuesday by retail dealers."
Two causes are pointed out as mak-
ing this order necessary. It is known
that heavy meat shipments, held up
during the winter on this side, were
delayed in transit until a few weeks
ago. They have already reached the
Pacific and Atlantic ports and sup-
plied the wants of the Allies.
Tremendous amounts of soft corn,
injured by an early frost in the corn
belt, were fed to hogs and cattle, and
corn-fed live _stock, has resulted in
meat sources of abundanceand qual-
ity.
The food administration urges that
the wheat consumption be cut down
to 21,000,000 bushels a month to save
the Allies until harvest. The use of
wheat has been limited to one and a
half pounds a week per person, and
wheat products, including pies and
cakes, are cut to one-half pound per
person.
Mr. Prescott appealed for the co-
operation of everyone in conserving
wheat products. He said, "To effect
the needed saving of wheat we are
wholly dependent on the voluntary as-
sistance of all the American people."
.March Inlander
On Sale Today
An article entitled "An Experiment
in Aesthetics," by Prof. F. N. Scott
of the rhetoric department, is one of
the features of the March Inlander
which will go op sale today. Profes-
so. Scott has made some interesting
observations of a child's appeciation
of art, and he tells the rather surprid-
ing and naive reactions of a child's
mind to beautiful pictures.
Lucile Quarry, '18, the author of
"The Military Cross," has contributed
two of a series of a quite different
sort, whicheshe calls "Caikly Chron-
icles.' They are character sketches,,
poignant in reality and impressive in
simplicity.
Two alumni in the service have
sent wartime sketches. Ingle Whin-
ery describes stunt night in an army
camp, while Leon Cunningham tells
what it means to be a yeoman.
"The White Marquis" is concluded
in this issue, and Everyman, as usual,
gives many brief and intimate per-
sonal glimpses.
UNDERCLASSMEN TO APPEAR
BEFORE SCHOOLMASTERS
Freshman and sophomore classes
will demonstrate their work before the
Michigan State Schoolmasters' club at
4 o'clock this afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium. The order of the pro-
gram is:
Entrance of classes; gymnastic
drill, jump the rope relay; I'll "Catch
and Fetch Her," dance by sopho-
mores; The Ostendaise dance by the
freshman class; gymnastic drill and
games by the sophomores; a Dutch
waltz by the freshman classes:; a
Kerry dance by the sophomores; mil-
itary marching by an elective class;
the Winter and Abandon dances by

the dancing classes; apparatus work;
a basketball game by the classes
1918-20 vs. 1919-21.
Tickets for this demonstration may
be obtained now at the office of Miss
Alice Evans, physical director for wo-
men, in Barbour gymnasium.
Submarines Increase Weekly Toll
London, March 27. - Submarines
and mines have increased their week-
ly toll of British shipping. The ad-
miralty report shows that in the last
week 28 merchantment were sunk,
16. of the vessels being 1,600 tons or
over, and 12 under that tonnage. One
fishing vessel was lost
Kalamazoo Club Will Banquet
The Kalamazoo Normal club will
give a dinner at.6 o'clock this evening
at the First Methodist Episcopal

Suggests Patriotic Verse For Anthem
A suggested fourth verse for "The Yellow and Blue," Michigan's
college anthem, has been written by Bertha C. Herbst, '12. It deals
fundamentally with Michigan men in the service.
The proposed addition is as follows:
Hail to our College men fighting for right,
Hurrah 'for the Yellow and Blue!
Blue for each' star on. its background of white, :
- With a- prayer that the gold stars be few;
Loyal the answer our. men gave the call,
And loyal-.our women who help through it all. Hail!
Hall to our College men fighting for right,
Hurrah for the Yellow and Blue!

* ENGINEERS WILL ASSEMBLE
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BRITISH FORCES DRIVE GERMAN S
OUSER 96S U AND ABLAINZEVI

* * * * * * m * * * *

U BETA P TAKES
.1 NEW MEMBERS
u Beta Pi, senior engineering
r fraternity, held its annual spring
ation last night, and took in the
wing members of the junior
: E. J. Arnold, C. B. Campbell,
Dahlstrom, Roy Eliott, J. P. Mac-
an, E. L. Nugent, E. L. Spanagel,
[. Wilson and W. F. Zing. P. D.
rich of Lansing, and F. C. Bur-
of Detroit, were also admitted as
ni members.
banquet at the Delta followed the
ation ceremonies, Prof: John E.
wiler speaking for the faculty, A.
[oore giving the welcome, and C.
ampbell representing the ini-
)N OPERA WILL PLAY AT
FLINT INSTEAD OF SAGINAW
et's Go!" will be presented April
the Majestic theater in Flint, in-
I of in Saginaw, as previously an-
.ced. The Union was unable to en-
a theater in either Saginaw,
ing, or Grand Rapids.
Lis will be the first time that a
igan Union opera has ever visit-
Flint, although previous operas
received numerous invitations to
performances there. The city
an enthusiastic alumni body, and
Jnion expects that they will rally
e support of "Let's Go!"
.e first of the pre-trip rehearsals
held yesterday afternoon and
ing at the Union. Several
ges which are designed to bet-
he show are being made.

PHORMIG, TRASLTED,:
MEETS' WITH- SUCCESS
CLASSICAL CLUB ANNUAL PLAY
PRESENTED BY EXCELLENT
CAST
(By EL. R.)
Terence's "Phormio," one of the
masterpieces of Roman comedy, was
presented in English last night by the
Classical club in University hall.
With much of the.objection to an-
cient drama in a foreign tongue re-
moved by the use. of a clever transla-
tion made by Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson.
of the engineering English depart-
ment, the play appealed more strong
ly to the popular interest, and suc-
ceeded in demonstarting conclusively
that. the classicsare not yet dead.
Story Interesting
Upon the framework f a eon's fear -
of his father's wrath at his marriage
to an unknown girl, a friend's pass-
ionate love for a slave maiden, and
a hen-pecked husband's dread of his
wife's discovery that he has another
spouse, Terence has woven a master-
piece which abounds in humorous sit-
nations, witty lines, and rapid move-
ment.h
George D. Wilner, instructor in the
oratory department and director of
the production, in the role of Geta, the
scheming slave, was easily the star
of the performance. Playing quite a
difficult part, Wilner acted it to per-
fection, and the spontaneity and nat-
uralness of his work called forth
many laughs from the appreciative
audience.
Carson is Clever
In the portrayal of Phormio, an in-
ventive, conceited parasite, Ralph M,-
Carson, grad., had many opportunities
for clever work, and he lost none of
them. Enjoying immensely the hu-
mor of the situations into which his
knavery has thrown his fellow towns-
men, Carson conveyed that spirit to
his audience, at no time allowing in-
terest to drag.
Making his first appearance before
an Ann Arbor audience, Albert C.
Jacobs, '21, as Demipho, a' gentlemuan
of Athens, displayed' considerable
dramatic ability.- W. Keith Chidester,
'20, taking the role of Chremes, the
hen-pecked husband, played his part
well, patiently enduring the awful
wrath of his wife, Nausistrate, a role
carried by Elizabeth Bakes, '20.
Cast Good-
Though the greater part of the cast
of "Phormio" was inexperienced, it
played well up to the standard set by
former Classical club productions,
and the presentation met due succesi'
for its faithful pieturization of the an-
cient tribes as peoples who thought,
reasoned, and felt as we do today.
IU. S. WARSHIP BRINGS IN
CAPTURED HUN SEA PEST
A Pacific Port, March 27. - Nine
prisoners of war, two of them women,
arrived here today aboard a United
States warship which had in tow the
auxiliary schooner, the Alexander Ag-
ossiz, outfitted by Germans as a raid-
er of the sea.
The schooner was captured a week
ago off the coast .of Mexico.
Government officials said that they
had information to the respect that
seven Germans who embarked on the
would-be raider at Mazatlam, Mex-
ico, had orders from the German con-
sul there to seize any ship they could,

and then to proceed to the South Seas
for raiding activities against com-
merce of the Allies.a

Senior, junior; and sophomore
engineers will hold assemblies
this morning, the seniors meeting
at 8 o'clock, the juniors at 11
o'clock, and the sophomores at 10
o'clock. The question of an ex-
tended summer session will be
presented at each assembly by
Dean M. E. Cooley.

* I FRtEM

SPEIA CURSE ADED
IN NAVAL ACHITECTURE
NAVY DEPARTMENT NEEDS MEN
EXPERIENCED IN DRAFTING;
SENIORS ELIGIBLE
Naval architecture will be offered
by the University as a special short
beginning April 1, at the request of the
navy department and the civil service
commission. The work will be open
to seniors in the engineering college
only.
According to a letter received by
Prof. Herbert C. Sadler, of the naval
architecture and marinenengineerng
department, "Each student will be
rated' as if' he had finshed the course,
but no' applicant' will be declared elig-
ible for appointment until there shall
be fled with the 'commission a certifi-
cate stating' that the applicant has
satisfactorily passed the course."
Draftsmen Needed
Reasons for offering the course, as
explained by the commission, show
that there is an urgent.need.for drafts-
men. The commission wrote "that all
instiutions which undertake to add to
the available supply of draftsmen are
rendering a service of the greatest
value to th'e people,"
In connection with the' draft, Mr. F.
D. Roosevelt, assistant -secretary of
the navy, writes, "Draftsmen in the
navy department, who are registrants
upon request to their local boards for
thei -tansfer. to the emergency fleet
classification list, will secure total
exemption from the draft so long as
they are meployed."
Fifty Hours Work
The work required in the course will
be 50 hours in the class room, and 100
hours 'of drafting or its equivalent.
Students who drop other' work will
receive partial credit for such courses,
with six hours credit for this special
short course added.
Training and experience of the indi-
vidual will determine the scale of pay.
The sum varies from $4 to $4.96 per
day.
MICHIGAN TECHNIC
COMES OUT TODAY
The Michigan Technic will be on
sale at the tables in the Engineering
building all day today and tomorrow.
Engineering society members must
have their cards with them in order
to obtain their' copies. Non-members
may purchase the Technic at 40 cents
a copy.
The leading- article is by Dean Mor-
timer E. Cooley, and is entitled, "The
Engineer and the War." This treatise
features a photographic reproduction
of President Wilson's letter to Dean
Cooley, with comments on the letter
by the dean.
F. W. Gerhardt, '17E, in an article
on "Absolute Safety in Aircraft" tells
of air machines and appliances, which
their inventors claim will reduce the
danger of air-flight almost to zero or'
may even end the war in 30 days.
Another prominent article in this
month's Technic is "Elementary The-
ory of the Gas Producer" by Prof. W.
L. Badger of the chemical engineering
department.
Lumber Pile Blase Extinguished
A lumber pile in the yard of a res-
idence on the corner of South State
and Granger streets caught 'fire yes-

terday afternoon, and gained consid-
erable headway before it was extingu-
ished by the city fire department.

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Cane Selected y
Senior Li Class
The cane committee of the senior
literary class has selected cane No.
1962 at the Wadham State street store
as the official stick of the 1918 class.
The committee, seeing all the sam-
ples in the various stores on the cam-
pus, made its selection because of the
lightness and distinctiveness of this
cane. The stick is different from any
other ever chosen for a senior class.
Since it takes several weeks to se-
cure the canes after the order has
been placed, it is imperative that all
senior fits make arrangements at once
for their canes. The price' is $2.50,
half of which must be paid when the
stick is ordered, the balance being
paid upon delivery.
Carl Bay, Arcade jeweler, who en-
graved most of the canes last year,
will also place the names and class
upon all sticks purchased from Wad-
ham for the senior literary class. An
additional expense of approximately
20 cents is added for the engraving.
Few senior sits have placed their
orders for caps and gowns, and
George Keyer and George Moe, who
have the class order, are anxious to
sign up the rest of the men before
spring vacation. Some misunder-
standing was caused by a notice in
The Daily yesterday regarding the
payment of a dollar down upon order.
No money is deposited until the caps
and gowns are delivered, when $3.50
is paid, one dollar of which is refund-
ed when the caps and gowns are re-
turned.
Robert Patterson will collect dues
from the members of the class Friday
in University hall.
NURSES' TRAINING
TO BE ADVOCATED
Nurses'.training for college women=
will be the subject of an address by
Mrs. John Wood Blodgett of Grand
Rapids, this morning at Hill auditor-
ium. Mrs. Blodget is a trustee of
Vassar college and one of the pro-
moters of the course to be given there.-
Her speech will follow that of Prof.
John Dewey who is to speak at 10

FOE LOSES 400,000
IN MAMMOTH
Americans Give Good Accou
Ability as Fighters; B
Up Allied Line

BULLETIN

"CH BREAK UP
ATTACKS AT LASI
AND NOYON

LONDON, MARCH 27. - B
FORCES DROVE BACK TB
MANS TODAY IN A SER
COUNTER ATTACKS SOU'
ROSIERES TO NORTH OF A
ZEVILLE. BRITISH GAINS
SOMME SECTOR ARE REPI
ED BY THE RECAPTURE C
LANCOURT AND CHAPELL
London, March 27.- The
forces are not-only offering st
sistance to heavy enemy atta
north and south of the river
but have carried out numerou
er attacks during the day, res
the regainhig of ground and
ing back of the Germans at
points.
Haig's Report
The report from Field
Haig tonight declares that
operations heavy casualtie
been inflicted on the enemy.
Intense fighting has taken p
ing the day from south of Re
north of Ablainzeville.
"At Rosieres all the enen
saults have been beaten off
troops," the statement says.
"Part of our position to t'
of Albert into which the e
one time forced its way was
by us by a counter attack, and
er heavy attack delivered by
emy at this point during the a
was completely repulsed.
"Attempts made by the eni
ing the day to debauch w
from the town of Albert we:,
back, in each instance with I
iest casulaties."
French Break Up Atta4
Paris, March 27.-With fret
the Germans today attadkej th
lines edst of Montdidief and
their assualts were repulsed
times they succeeded in maki
advance, according to the w
announcement tonight. Aroui
igny and Noyon powerful e
tacks were broken up.
Berlin, via London, March.
both banks of the Somme ou
are engaged in a slowly pro
attack," says the German of&ic
munication issued this event

o'clock.
The Vassar plan is to give women a
three months' course of training this T
summer, which will admit them to fensi
hospitals in the fall and enable them dimit
to graduate in two years. Graduates the
of approved colleges between 1909 indi
and 1918 are eligible. ingn
The Red Cross is attempting to in- dergo
terest a number of college women in weab
nursing. It has been estimated by Wh
Surgeon-General Gorgas that one- capt
third of the 90,000 nurses now in this Roye
country will be needed for service in to g
army hospitals during the present super
year. puls
Tickets .for the meeting may be ob-
tained at the registrar's office. They
will be given free to undergraduates. TRA
Individual conferences with Mrs.'
Blodgett may be arranged for by
senior and graduate women at 41 Am
o'clock today in Barbour gymnasium. long
throu
R. 0. T. C. Band Will Make Debut-on th
The R. 0.T. C. band of 125 will other
make its first appearance this after- ed m
noon, when it will lead the Second accor
regiment and the first battalion of ents
the First regiment in their march to Ma
the Ferry field drill grounds. train
Those attending the Schoolmasters' pond
club convention which begain today in no
will witness the march to the field accon
and the drill, of st

(By Associated Pres
ae flanks of the great G
ve in France apparent
nishing. 'On the seven
titantic battle there we
ations that the enemy
materially the strain h
one, and that his power
kened through hard ust
hile the town of Albert
ured from the British an
, the French have been
ve ground in the face
rior numbers, the Britisl
led heavy attacks both
(Continued on Page

INS OF WOUN
TRAVEL THI

nsterdam,
ambulance

for More Yanks
i 27.-A message
eorge, prime min-
ain, calling upon
a send "American
ss the Atlantic in

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