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March 27, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Iswer

lied

Candy Shop
Arcade

LACK OF WORK NOT
FELT IN ANN ARBOR

Work for men in Ann Arbor is more
uron again plentiful this year than it has been
for some time. There are many jobs
arance, for which cannot be filled both in the city
isiasts are and in the country.
warm day There are no men in the city apply-.
canoes for ing for positions, according to Chief
of Police Thomas O'Brien, and there
are many more vacancies than there
, and the are men to be had for work. The
>s above its fire department needs the services of
is reduced two men and the city wants quite a
ie river is number of laborers to work on the
to Mr. W. streets. Besides municipal jobs, the
and canoe Hoover Steel Ball company offers
s were left work for several men in its shops. The
er last fall farmers are in need of hundreds of
men to care for the fields, and re-
ess for the quests come in to the city daily for
ason," said help. There is no need of any man's
"Our can- being idle this year, according to Mr.
ed, and we O'Brien.
ew Morris Carpenters, painters, decorators,
ir stock. I and other contractors and building
e canoeing laborers can find no work in their'
use of the trades. Practically no construction
is in good work is being done in the city, and re-
one need pair jobs are scarce. Many refuse to
r or a bad redecorate their homes because of the
necessity of using soft coal again next
- - winter. Nearly all of the men who
ot Decline have enrolled in the shipbuilding re-
npire, be- serve being recruited at the post office
baseball as are those who work at building trades.
ill not be 'Many houses that are already built
v'ar, are standing vacant, and people will
a the fact not invest in more construction work.
ub contin- The number of men unemployed is
.g of sub- so much smaller than the number of
opportun- positions open that conditions can be
re worth, said to be good. There is plenty of
ers go work for every available man in the
unger men city and country.
and Evans
m will be AMERICA TO EXCEL

SHIPBUILDING PROGRA
MUST GET MEN TO BATTLE FRONT
AT ONCE IN ORDER TO WIN
WAR SAYS CHAIRMAN
New York, March 26.-America's ef-
fort to meet German submarine war,
whose full menace has just been re-
vealed in British admiralty figures on
sinkings of ships was outlined here
tonight by Chairman Hurley, of the
shipping board, in a frank statement
setting forth the shipbuilding situa-
tion In the United States.
Before the Natinoal Marine League,
Mr. Hurley disclosed that despite de-
lays the country soon will have 730
steel and wooden ways turning out
ships and that the government's main-
moth steel shipbuilding program of
eight million tons on March 1 was 28
per cent on its way to completion.
This does not mean that 28 per cent
are in the water, but that construction
as a whole had advanced that far.
Eight per cent of the vessels actually
have been put into service, Mr. Hur-
ley said.
American Shipyards Set Record
The three government fabricating
yards near Philadelphia, when in full
operation, will be able to produce,
Mr. Hurley said, more ships in a year
than all the yards of England, here-
tofore the greatest shipbuilding coun-
try in the world.
"Unless we get our men to the bat-
tle front, we will not win the war,
and therefore it all comes back to
ships," said Mr. Hurley. "Upon the
shipping board has devolved the re-
sponsibility of supplying this need and
supplying it under the most extraor-
dinary conditions that ever existed, at
a time when every other industry is
being taxed to its utmost capacity in
the matter of materials and labor to
provide war necessities.
Not a Maritime Nation
"The handicaps have been many.
We were not a maritime nation. With
the exception of a few widely scatter-
ed yards, merchant marine construc-
tion had almost become a lost art with
us. Then came this sudden call at a
moment when the navy was undergo-
ing the greatest expansion in its his-
tory-when most, if not all, of the es-
tablished yards were feverishly en-
gaged in rush construction on dread-
naughts, destroyers, submarines, fuel
ships, tenders and other auxiliary
craft and when munition makers were
absorbing that part of skilled labor
which had not been called to govern-
ment navy yards or private shipbuild-
ing plants.
"I wish to remind you gentlemen
that ships are not built over night.
When we took hold of this job of ship-
building, we found there was no ship-
yard in existence with which we could
place an order. The old yards were
filled to capacity. We were faced
with the necessity of creating an en-
tirely new industry. We had to es-
tablish the yards first, get the ship-
builders to take charge of them, and
train the men to build the ships.
Shipyards Are Increased
"There were 37 steel shipyards in
America at the time of our entrance
into the war. We have located 81 ad-
ditional steel and wood yards while
18 other yards have been expanded.
We are building in the new and ex-
panded steel yards 235 new steel ship-
ways, or 26 more than at present exist
in all the shipyards of England. If
we had been content with doing the
job in a small way, we might have
built a few new yards and added a lit-

tle to our capacity. A few ships might
have been finished more quickly; but
it was the spirit and will of America
to do the job in a big way and the
judgment of the country will be vin-
dicated by the results when all these
new ways are completed and are turn-
ing out ships. Many of these ways
have actually been finished. The new
industry we have created will make
America the greatest maritime nation
in the history of the world."
MILITARY NEWS
Prof. Arthur E. Boak of the history
department, will lecture to the cadets
at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Hill
auditorium.
Non-commissioned officers of the
first battalion 'of the First regiment
will instruct the men in their com-
panies in sighting bar exercises at
4:15 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in
Waterman gymnasium.
Lieut. George C. Mullen will be ab-

"Chin-Chin," at the-
tomorrow.
TODAY

-Whitney, *
*
*
*

* * * * * * * * *

Al. H. Wilson in "The
15th," at the Whitney. -

Irish *
*

AT THE WHITNEY

Majestic - -Mary MacLane in
"Men Who Have Made Love to
Me."
Wuerth-All star cast in "Be-
ware of Strangers."

*
*
I
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*
*

AT THE THEA]
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
"Keep Her Smiling," at
rick.

"Chin-Chin," the comic opera which
appears at the Whitney tomorrow
night, is patterned after the old fairy
tale story of "Alladin and the Won-
derful Lamp." The authors have tak-

I WH ITN EYeT"EATREThur.

Orpheuni - Alyn
"Gown of Destiny."
"The Eagle's Eye."

Reubens in
Also serial,

ar.

s* s* *
TERS *
Drew in '
the Gar- *
*

The Only Company presenting the Greatest American
Musical Comedy-Charles Dillingham's

Arcade-Theda Bara in "Cam-
ille." Also Mutt and Jeff cartoon,
"His Favorite Nephew."

week, beginning tomorrow, and the
management promises that the per-
formance will be well up to the usual
standard in this theater. The play
has five complete settings, more than
20 songs, and a number of new dance
novelties. The press agent calls par-
ticular attention to the last scene
which shows a beach roof garden with
the coast and ocean in the back-
ground.

f*

* .- * * s * * * s * s 1
AT THE MAJESTIC
The popular musical comedy,
"Pretty Baby," will be shown at the
Majestic for the latter half of this

an amazing combination of fa
scenes in such a bewildering
that the familiar story can har
detected.
ARCADI
Show- at 3. 7 and 8:3o Eastern 1
x5c Unless Otherwise Specifie
T1Ies-WVed-26-27-Theda Bara in "C
il"' and (rues) Pathe News, (W
Mutt & Jeff Cartoon, "His Fav<
Nephew." oc.
Thur-28-Normna Talmadge in "The
cret of the Storm Country" (R
and Christie Comedy, "Almost
vorced."
Fri 29-Constance Talmadge in "
I Honeymoon" and Christie Corn;
20C.

WITH DOYLE AND DIXON

Two Years at the Globe Theatre, N.Y.

Prices 75c-$1.00-$1.50-$2,0. Seat Sale starts March 26.

Mall orders

F"

lb

Whitney

Theatre

- TONIGHT

,.r--

Sidney R. Ellis Presents
America's Singing Comedian

AL.-do

H.

WILSON

In a New Military Song Play
By Theo. Burt Sayre
ALL SONGS NEW

15th

The Most Ambitious Offering in this Great A rtists Career
A FEAST OF MUSIC
I Want You Then Iachree" "My Iother's Wedding Ring"
"Ireland is Your Home Siveet Home"
""A Lily From Heaklen" "The Irish Will ie There"

Prices.

50c

- 75c - $1.00

$1

MAJESTIC,. -

LAST TIM]
Today

MatWed
Sat. 75
D rew~

1321

co.

Corsages
Decorations

IN DYES AFTER WAR,
d
c "Germany will find after the war
that the world is no longer dependent
upon her for those products which al-
ways used to be associated with the
phrase 'Made in Germany'," declared'
Prof. Edward D. Campbell, director of
the chemical laboratory, yesterday af-
ternoon in referring to the report that
American companies are now manu-
facturing German dyes,
"For many years we in this country
have been making dyes every bit as
good as those made in Germany, but
not in such a variety of shades. Since
there has not been very much money
in the business, the industry did not
expand until the beginning of the war.
It has talsen much time to work out
the formulas for the different dye-
stuffs, but our chemists are quite as
skilled as German chemists and when
they have acquired a little more ex-
perience in this field we should sur-
pass Germany in both quality of dye
and quantity of production.
"Thirty years ago," continued Pro-
fessor Campbell, "the United States
was dependent on Germanw for four-
fifths of the cement used here, but
cement users made a determined effort
to build up the industry until we now
export quantites of that material each
year. The dyestuff industry should
follow the same course.
"France is even now taking steps
to assure her economic independence
from Geramny after the war. The
French government has recently fin-
anced a great plant for the production
of high explosives during the war but
which is to manufacture dyestuffs aft-
er peace is declared. It is interesting'
to note that the very plants that are
now engaged in making high explo-
sives can turn to the manufacture of
dye materials, the processes being es-
sentially the same."
Rugs cleaned and washed. Satisfac-
tion guaranteed.' Koch and Henne.-

I .

(HERSELF)
-IN-

THE 'BIG SENSATION !

Men who have made Love to M
(BY HERSELF)

MARY

The Stripping naked of a Woman's Soul

MACLAN E

Revelations of the startling love episodes in the life of a peculiarly fascinating
woman-written and acted by herself, supported by six leading men.
SHOWS -- 3:00 7:00 8:30 - - SHOWS

20c

We pay the Tax

"Be-
a in
stone

MWAJESTIC

THURSDAY,
FRIDAY, .
SATURDAY.

. .
. .0
. .0

.
.
.0

MARCH
MARCH
MARCH

Sister."

"The

JIMMIE HODGES Presents
MAGNETIC JEAN TYNES

THE SMARTEST OF MUSICAL SHOWS

PRETTY

B

5c;

WITH
Funny-Droll ELMER COUDY and a Host of Pretty
YOU'VE SEEN THE REST-NOW SEE THE BEST
15 Song Gems-10 Big Dancing Numbers-Scenic Environment Just Right-Youth and C

II

J.L sent from the city for a few days to
.. Main attend the funeral of his grandfather
who died in Jefferson, Ohio.

Matinees at 8:00
E.-

SHOWS
Nights at 7:30-9:00
stern Time

1

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