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March 26, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-26

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1918.

PRI

of

TURNED
. SOLDIERS
;he second campaign
idiers which closed
of 400 volumes have
the University 11-
of the "Engineering
ending from June to
vas brought in this
s are represented to
than has been the
ay engineering text-
ibuted, though most

I campaign is
ibrary will be
onal contribu-
y for camp li-
volumes are
ecent bulletins
ary service of
y association.
ted among the
red, but recent
be accepted.

s are not 11
specially desi
of them will

REAY FOR
PRESENTATIONI

.L CLUB

PLAY HOLDS;
L; INCLUDES

30

Final dress rehearsal for "Phor-
mio," the Classical club play which
will be presented at 8 o'clock Wed-
nesday night in University Hall, was
held last night. Those in charge of
the production stated that it realized
all that had been hoped for from the
competent cast selected for the pre-
sentation.
Ralph M. Carson, grad, whose work
in the "Manaechmi," and "Iphigenia
Among the Taurians," former Classi-
cal club plays, will be remember-
ed on the campus, assumes the title
role this year in "Phormio," playing
the part of a shrewd, inventive man
about town who makes his living by
his wits.
G. D. Wilner Takes Comic Part
George. D. Wilner, instructor in the
oratory department and director of
the play, whose versatility as an ac-
tor has been demonstrated by suc-
cesses in "The Servant in the House,"
"Manaechmi," "The Magic Carpet,"
"The Merry Wives of Windsor," "The
Pillars of Society," and the Shakes-
pearean pageant, takes the part of
Geta in this production. As the half-
starved, ragged slave of Demipho, he
undoubtedly has the best comic role
which he has yet attempted.
Antipho and Phaedria are ably por-
trayed by Lewis P. Waldo, '18, who
has appeared before on the campus in
the "Manaechmi" and "Iphigenia
Among the Taurians," and Lionel G.
Crocker, '18, familiar for his work in
"The Tragedy of Nan."
Cast Sets High Standard
Other members of the cast, while
not yet prominent among campus
dramatic stars, play well up to the
standard set by the more experienced
actors.
Robert T. Monroe, '18, will appear
as Davus, a slave; Elizabeth B. Oakes,
'20, as Nausitrata, wife of Chremes;
William K. Chidester, '20, as Chremes,
the brother of Demipho; Geraldine
Brasie, '21, as Saphrona, a nurse; Al-
bert C. Jacobs, '21, as Demipho, a gen-
tleman of Athens, and Wilfried R.
Lawrie, '21, as Dorio, a slave dealer.
DR. VAN DER SLICE TO HOLD
PHTHISIS CLINIC IN OWOSSO

PRFSSORDEEY
TO LECTURE HERE
Was Former Faculty Member; Now
Holds Chair of Philosophy
at Columbia
PRESIDENT JESSUP OF IOWA
UNIVERSITY ALSO ON PROGRAM
Educators of National Repute to Ap-
pear at Conference of School
Superintendents
Professor John Dewey of Columbia
university, and President Walter A.
Jessup of the University of Iowa, will
be the principal speakers at the con-
ference of Michigan superintendents
and school boards to be held in Ann
Arbor for five days beginning today
under the auspices of 'the University
department of education and the de-
partment of public instruction at
Lansing. About 200 are expected to
attend.
Prof. A. S. Whitney Praises Dewey
Professor Dewey was a member of
the University of Michigan faculty
during the years 1884-90, going to the
University of Chicago when it was
opened. Prof.. Allen S. Whitney of
the University department of educa-
tion says of him: "He is perhaps the
foremost philosopher and educator in
the United States, if not in the world."
Prof. Dewey has written a book on
philosophy "School and Society,
which Dr. Kirschsteiner of Munich
speaks of as the only American book
that has been used in continuation
schools in Germany.
Dr. Jessup is likewise an educator
of national repute. He will be enter-
tained, during his stay here, by Pro-
fessor and Mrs. Whitney. Professor
Dewey will be entertained by Dean
Alfred H. Lloyd of the Graduate
school.
To Hold Session at Hill Auditorium
On Tuesday and Wednesday, Pro-
fessor Dewey and Dr. Jessup will de-
liver lectures and hold conferences in
Room B of the Law building. On
Thursday, .the educational institute
will unite in Joint session with the
Michigan Schoolmasters' club, and
Professor Dewey and Dr. Jessup will
lecture at Hill auditorium. Thursday
evening, Supt. William Wirt of Gary,
Indiana, will give an illustrated lec-
ture on the Gary school system, which
attracted so much attention in the
recent New York elections. All of
the lectures are free and tickets of
admission may be obtained at Regis-
trar Hall's office.
NOTED PROFESSORS
SPEAK HERE TODAY
Professor John G. Winter of the
classical department, Professor Gor-
don. J. Laing of the University of Chi-
cago, and Prof. C. T. Currelly, direc-
tor of the Royal Ontario museum of
archaeology at the University of Tor-
onto, are the speakers that will ad-
dress the second short term institute
for teachers of classics, ancient his-
tory, and literature, to be held in this
city during the next four days.
Professor Winter will lcture Tues-
day, Wednesday, and Friay on the
ancient Aegean civilization. Profes-
sor Laing will give four lectures on
the Roman religion at 11 a. m. Tues-
day and Wednesday and at 4:15 p. m.
on the same days. Professor Currelly
will speak at 4:15 Thursday afternoon
"Recent Discoveries in Egypt," as
svealing Roman domestic life.
These lectures are held under the

auspices of the University Classical
department. They will be given in
Room A of the Alumni Memorial hall
building and will all be illustrated by
stereoptican views. Last year about
400 teachers attended, although Prof.
Francis W. Kelsey said that attend-
ance might be smaller this year due
to the war.

CITY CANVASSED
IN STAMP DRIVE
Every house in Ann Arbor, includ-
ing fraternities, were canvassed till
late last night in the interest of the
thrift stamp campaign. Although no
reports were made to Postmaster Hor-
atio J. Abbott last night, it is expected
that the success of the drive will equal
that of a similar Red Cross drive,
which was so successful in the rais-
ing of funds for that organization.
The entire-city was divided into dis-
tricts over which captains had been
appointed. Under these captains were
selected lieutenants to assist them,
each covering an entire city block.
Late last night Mr. Abbott said- that
he had received no report from any of
the solicitors, but that they were
working far in the night. The orders
will be taken to Mr. Abbott who will
distribute the stamps in the next two
days, collecting the money for them
upon their delivery.
ASK RETRIAI FOR MOONEY
AT LocALMASS MEETING
JUDGE E. J. JEFFRIES OF DE-
TROIT SPEAKS IN BEHALF
OF LABOR LEADER
Judge E. J. Jeffries, of the record-
er's court in Detroit, last night ad-
dressed a large audience at Labor
temple, which had gathered to protest
against the hanging of Tom Mooney.
He sketched the aims of the labor
unions of the country and told Qf the
prejudice they have had to fight in
order to maintain themselves.
"People in small communities such
as this," said Judge Jeffries, "fail to
realize the contrast between their own
conditions of labor and those In the
large cities. Here the men come in
personal touch with their employer,
but in the vast industries of the city
the employers do not know their em-
ployees and pay no attention to them,
unless they are forced to do so."
In his plea for Mooney, Judge Jef-
fries said that courts and judges are
only human and follow the instincts
of their class. He is sure that they
have over reached themselves in Cali-
fornia and he urged labor to make its
voiceheard in demanding a new trial
for these men.
Harry Weinberger, well known la-
bor attorney of New York, made a
plea at the meeting in behalf of Moon-
ey. Mr. Johanson-of California gave
a recital of the facts of the trial.
Resolutions were passed at the meet-
ing to send telegrams to President
Wilson and the -Governor of Califor-
nia urging that Mooney be - given a
new trial.
UNIVERSITY ACCEPTS OFFER .
TO TRAIN AERO MECHANICS
Acceptance of the proposition to
train 200 airplane mechanics to be
sent here early in April by the gov-
ernment, was wired Washington today
by the University. The University will
furnish lodging and sustenance as
well as instruction. Contract figures
could not be obtained..
The division will consist of gas eng-
ine repair men, blacksmiths, gun-
smiths, and carpenters, who are to
be given technical training by the
University under the terms of the
contract for a period of two months'
The gas engine men will receive in-~

struction in the mechanical laboratory
of the Engineering building, while
the others will occupy the engineering
shops.
SENIORS MUST MAKE CANE
SELECTIONS WITHIN WEE-K
Samples of senior canes are on ex-
hibition at six stores and selections
must be made within the next week in
order that the canes may be received
in time.
Dealers having the samples are
Wadhams '& Co., Wagner & Co.,
George Kyer, George Moe, Malcolm &
Co.. and Capper & Capper.
17 Reported Misshng in Ship Collision
Washington, March 25.-Vice Admir-'
al Simms cabled the navy department
today that in addition to 17 dead, 17
men are missing from the American
destroyer Manley as. a result of her

Berlin via London, March 25.-Between
official report from headquarters this eve
their way forward."

London, March 25.-In a message to Field Marshall I
George, the British premier, says that the men necessar
lost are either now in France or on their way.. All gunw
and still further reinforcements of men and guns are r
battle.

SUCCESS PREDICTED
FOR JUNIOR PLAY
When the curtain rose last evening
for the final rehearsal of the Junior
-Girls' play, the players, all carefully
selected from the girls of the junior
class, showed themselves worthy of
having their names inscribed in the
dramatic annals of the University.
The name of the play has not yet been
divulged. -
The cast and chorus have been un-
der the direction of Prof. John R.
Brumm, of the rhetoric department,
and Emily Powell, '19, who is chair-
man of the play committee. The play
will be presented at Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall in Barbour gymnasium, the
performance beginning at 8 o'clock
tonight.
The annual senior supper will be
held at 6 o'clock this evening in the
basement of the Congregational
church after they have viewed the
play. This occasion will constitute
the first appearance of the 1918 wo-
men in cap and gown.
The play will be repeated Saturday
afternoon. Tickets have been placed
on sale for both performances in the
corridor of University hall.
DAYLIGHT SAVING LAW NOT
TO AFFECT CAMPUS SCHEDULE

With the British ar
March 25.-This has
most desperate and sa
ing along the whole fr
battle zone. The Gertr
tinned to hurl great foi
into battle depending la
of numbers to overcome
opposition offered by t
Germans were pursuit
of working forward in
tion and the British ra
and riflemen were real
harvest from their po
high ground.
Notwithstanding thei
es, the Germans kept c
ing in the places of thoe
en and pressing their

EMEN SOUTH OF PERONNE; FR
RETIRE SLOWLYNEAR ST.
BATTLING FOR EVERY POINT OF VANTAGE, BRITISH G
ONLY WHEN OVERWHELMED, THOUGH LINE IN I
STILL REMAINS INTACT
MEN NECESSARY TO REPLACE TOSE L
ARE IN FRANCE OR ON WAY, SAYS
Teuton Progress Not As Alarming As in First Rush; Berli
Prisoners Have Been Taken; British Lose Heavily:
Casualties Are Comparatively Heavy
London, March 2.-"Fighting of the most severe description
ing place all day on wide fronts south of Peronne and south
Bapaume," says Field Marshall Haig's report from British
in France tonight.
"In both sectors the enemy has attacked our positions in
with fresh forces, and in spite of the gallant resistanice of 0
forced' us to give ground.
"Gernman troops are in Nesle and B apaume.. Heavy fightin
Paris, March 25.-The French forces which are fighting to
Quentine, around Noyon, though retiring slowly, are carry]
counter attacks and inflicting heavy losses on the Geruinans
office statement tonight.

his

o
o
ii
fo
li
th
a
th
th
e
m
w
G

are being
'eparedness
nt and fac-

(By Associated
March 25.-Battling f
f vantage, giving grou
verwhelmed by numbe
ng a frightful toll of 1
oot of ground abandon
ne in Picardy is still
he German onslaught
t a number of point
;here was no sign of dis
,he British forces. Or
nd of the long lie of 1
sh are standing firm.
Huns Capture
The largest gains ma
nans have been west
where they have captu
uiscard. These point,
he tip of the Teuton
pore than 10 miles fro
t stood on March 21.
Military observers di
cheme of the German a
ion of the German "]
f attack which was u
.oumania, and Serbia
onsists of two attacks,
part, which after p
ome depth turn towa
ompelling the forces c
,hem to fall back or b
apture.

YORK
work
event
s plan-

Dr. E. R. Van der Slice, me'dical
field director of the Michigan anti-tu-
berculosis association, was in Owosso
saturday, to arrange for the holding
of a clinic at that place in the near fu-
ture. Dr. Van der Slice, by the in-
vitation of the Berrien county anti-
tuberculosis society, will speak at 1:30
today at Benton Harbor on the needs
and advantages of having a sanitoriun
in Berrien county.

"When the daylight saving law
goes into, effect March 31 putting all th
clocks in this city one hour ahead, .I
do not expect the University time to it
change," said Secretary Shirley W.
Smith in commenting upon the effect S
the recent daylight saving law would. ti
have upon the University's time o
schedule.
Any action to change the Univer- c
sity's time would have to be taken a
by' the Board of Regents. Regent s
Junius E. Beal said that'he believed c
the Regents would not change the t
time. c
The daylight saving law, recently
passed by congress, and signed by
President Wilson pu s all railroad e
and federal clocks throughout the a
country one hour ahead between of
March 31 and October 1.

British

T
SI'

ay at

so

*t

s *
"'

Botanic
e I There

il Journal Club Meets Today
will be a meeting of the Bo-
Journal club at 4 o'clock this
n in rooid 173 Natural Science
A paper will be read by
unes B. Pollock, of the Bo-
partment, on "The InfluenceI

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Dr. L. P. Hall stated last night *
that there is no foundation to the
rumor that he had received from '*
his son overseas a telegram rela- *
tive to the developments of the *
last three days in France. Prof. *
H. E. Riggs, who was also accred- *
ited with having received a sim- *
ilar telegram, denied that any *
truth lay in the report. *
*

. E.Maclwain,
George E. Ma
ton, will give a
ture at 7:30 o'clc
the Methodist c
Labor." MacIlw
specialist and is
tions of employe
ing plans. He

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