100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 24, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

bLL5 Ut
MAO

JuunnUI ln
S FUTURE EVIL

WHAT'S GOING ONj
TODAY

GERMANS SHELL PARIS
1 2 MILES OI5TANT

Individualit

fabrics and Trimmings

en

)d based on present market costs.
ns and Trimmings Association.
id trade by buying early. We now
f blues and blacks, as well as many
twere bought before the heavy ad-
SCome in and look them over.
z of cash.

VIXLCOLM

ET;

MALCOLM BLOCK

U

cy"

or are you next
is "2" served ,per

Modeled on simplicity

's Servie
Glen Oren

U

IR

Supplies-

"Store with the College Spirit"

an & C. I
Detroit
tion, Boys!
ell your winter clothes.
prices to suit you.

PRES. HUTCHINS WARNS AGAINST
FORMATION OF U. S. BOL-
SHEVIKKI
Berkeley, Cal., March 23.--Sounding
a warning against what he termed
the " American bolsheviki" and rec-
ommending changes in the immigra-
tion laws, President Harry B. Hutch-
ins, of the University of Michigan, to-
day made the charter. day address at
the semi-centennial celebration at
the University of California.
President Hutchins took for his sub-
ject "the world war and some of its
by-products."
He said, in part:
Peril Now Crystallizing
"One of the by-products of the great
conflict is sure to be renewed and per-
sistant effort to .bring about a social
and economic revolution.
"The rallying cry will be democ-
racy, the sovereignity of the people'
not only in governmental affairs, but
in all the relations unrestrained, un-
diluted under regularly constituted
leadership, the leadership of repre-
sentative authority.
"And such democracy whether ap-
plied in goverment, In the industries,
in education or in any of the great re-
lations of life means anarchy,
"Hundreds of thousands of our loy-
al young men have been called to the
defense of the country and hunders
of thousands more must follow. Not
infrequently their places have been.
filled by aliens and others who are
both ignorant and hostile to the estab-
lished order.
Enemies Work From Within
"That large numbers are collect-
ing wages even in American muni-
tion plants who are hostile to our
institutions either through ignorance
or evil leadership, and who for the
safety of the country, should be in-
terned, is doubtless true. From such
as these the American bolsheviki are
recruited, but not from these alone,
for, unfortunately in the ranks of the
agitators are many who in name, at
least, are American citizens.
"Unless immediate and drastic steps
are taken to prevent it, democracy run
mad will surely be the peril of the not
distant future."
MICHIGAN WOMEN MAY ENTER
NURSES' TRAINING AT VASSAR
Michigan women graduates for the
last ten years are eligible for the
nurses' training camp, called the
"college woman's Plattsburgh," which
will open at Vassar college May 24.
It is established under the auspices
of the Council of National Defence
and the American Red Cross. It is
believed that more women than can
be accommodated will have made ap-
plication before May 1.
The course, which will last until
Sept. 13, will include those subjects
required by all first class nurses'
training schools. Many well-known
hospitals have made arrangements to
count the summer's work as a full
academic year, and to graduate in
two years such women as desire to
follow the camp instruction with
practical training and become regis-
tered nurses.
Vassar college - will turn over its
entire facilities to the camp, including
dormitories, laboratories, and the
grounds, with tennis courts, out-door
theater, and supplies from the farm.
WAR-BAKE SALE IS FEATURE
OF FOOD CONFERENCE HERE
Many women of Ann Arbor con-
tributed to the war-bake sale held
yesterday at Barbour gymnasium,
the proceeds of which will go toward

helping the committee on food con-
servation under the Council of Na-
tional Defence.
Tempting war cookies, bread, pud-
dings, and some vegetables were ex-
hibited, and recipes for each sold for
one cent. Miss Edith Blackman from
the Michigan State Normal, gave var-
ious substitutes for wheat flour at the
morning meeting of the food confer-
ence. Rice, cornmeal, oatmeal, and
other cereals were recommended for
bread recipes, while corn syrup and.
molasses were advocated instead of'
sugar. Dean Sarah Arnold, of Sim-
mons college spoke also on the need
of conservation of foods.
COLUMBIA STILL HEADS
WORLD COLLEGES LIST
New York, March 23.-While. war
conditions have cut down the regis-
tration at Columbia university, enroll-
ment statistics show that it is stil
the largest university in the world,
with a total of 17,600 students. Last
year the enrollment, was 20,234.

1
1
.
1
!

U-NOTICES
The cast of "L'Avocat Patelin" will
rehearse at 7 o'clock Monday night in
the Cercle Francais rooms. "Le Re-
tour Imprevu" will be rehearsed at 8
o'clock in the same rooms.
The Varsity Mandolin club will re-
hearse at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in
Room 205, Mason hall.
Reserved seats for "Phormlo" will
be on sale from 8 o'clock to 5 o'clock
on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday
in University hall.
NUNS TREACHEROUSLY
POISON 400 PRISONERS

Paris, March 23.-The first daylight
air raid on Paris came today. The
people of Paris crowded the streets,
and great numbers of people were
watching for an aerial battle.
Since the "all clear" signal was not
given, it was thought that something
new in the way of a raid was ex-'
pected. This was not explained until
a statement was issued saying that
the delay was due to bombardment by
long distance cannon.
The "all clear" was then sounded
and the normal life was resumed.
Pieces of shells on examination were
found to bear rifling marks which
proved that they had not been drop-,
ped, but had been fired from a gun.

12 o'clock-Rev. L.A. Barrett speaks
to student Bible class at the Presby- (Continued from Page One)
terian church on "How We Got Our lines on the south, the Germans have
Bible.," forced their way forward over a 21
12:15 o'clock-Prof. T. E. Rankin mile front, and have penetrated to a
speaks in Methodist church. depth of four or five miles west of
3:30 o'clock - Student volunteer Cambrai, and have reached Ham, west
band meets at the Methodist church. of St. Quentin, a distance of about nine
4 o'clock-Bible class meets at 444 miles west of the British line.
South State street. The German claim regarding the
6 o'clock-Young Peoples' society fightinglin shas not been substantiat-
mneets in Presbyterian church. ed by British official dispatches, but
6:30 o'clock-Wellington M. Logan, British reports show that there has
of Detroit, speaks at the Methodist been a retirement at various points.
church. According to a Berlin dispatch a
6:30 o'clock-Prof. W. R. Hum- large part of the British army has
phreys speaks to Plymouth Round been beaten.
Table at Congregational church.
7:30 o'clock-Mr. J. A. Burns speaks RIFLING MARKS ON SHELLS;
,in Methodist church. WERE FIRED FROM CANNON

NICKELS
ARCADE

JIN DETROIT
101 Washington Blvd.

I

goof ..o.,gft

GUNNER DEPE'W DESCRIBES
ROCITIES OF GER-
MANS

is but one of t
many outstandi:
features in RUB
FOOTWEAR.

AT-

OWNP

210 E. Hoover Ave.

I

Alfred J.Ruby
I INCORPORATED

I

"Four hundred Belgian and Russian
prisoners of Germany at the prison
camp of Brandenburg, known as the
'hell-hole of Germany,' were inocu-
lated with poison when they thought
they thought they were being protect-
ed against a 'black typhus' epidemic
that never existed," said Gunner De-
pew last night in Hill auditorium In
speaking of some of the horrors he
found in German prison camps.
For many months, Gunner Depew,
'who is a Chicago lad, was a prisoner
of war in Germany until he was re-
leased through efforts of Ambassador
James W. Gerard. Only one post card
of his, Depew said, ever reached this
country, that one being written by
ambassador Gerard about him to the
American government. The rest of
his fellow-prisoners' mail was torn
up by German officers, often before
the very eyes of their captives.
Officer Breaks Girl's Wrists
A shudder ran through the audi-
ence when Gunner Depew described'
how a German officer, who had been
nursed back to life solely by the un-
tiring efforts of a French nurse, broke
the girl's wrists by twisting them,
when ordered to shake hands with her.
"He did not need to be court-mar-
tialed," said Gunner Depew, "every
man in the hospital, no matter how
badly wounded, leaped up immediate-
ly to properly repay him."
"No medical attention was given to
prisoners of Germany at Dulmen,
where nine out of every ten men were
wounded," said Gunner Depew, "ex-
cept to supply them with water." De-
pew was a member of the crew of the
Georgic, captured by the adventur-
ous German sea-raider, Moewe. He
has received the French "croix de

I,

I :

WAR HEA)S CABLE PERSHING
TO SEND DEFINITE REPORT
Washington, March 23.-The war de-
partment cabled General Pershing to-'
night to forward immediately definite
information of the exact situation on
the British front where the British
troops are under the German on-
slaught.
The only official word at hand was
contained in the official statements is-
sued from London and Berlin.
Army officers here would give no
opinion lacking definite advices. Pri-
vately, however, their confidence in
the eventual repulse of the German
thrust remains unshaken. In the face
of all the reports received.
guerre" for bravery while fighting in
the Foreign Legion.
Father Sank With Maine
Gunner Depew talked very informally
to the audience and kept his hearers
constantly amused with humorous
stories of the things he encountered
in his fighting experiences. He was
introduced by Lieutenant Laurence of
Flint, who told how Depew's father
was among those who were sunk with
the battleship Maine.,
Pledge cards for the purchase of
thrift, and war savings stamps were
distributed to members of the aud-
ience, and Roscoe O. Bonisteel, chair-
man of the War Preparedness com-
mittee for Washtenaw county, ex-
plained the Thrift stanip drive to take
place Monday night.
Football Coaches Choose Officials
Chicago, March 23. - Football
coaches of the Big Ten met here today'
and collected officials for next sea-
son's games. The list follows:
Michigan, Reid, Michigan, Hedges,
Dartmouth, Haines, Yale; Elliot,
Northwestern; Birch, Earlham; Da-
vis, Michigan; Lippski, Chicago;
White, Illinois; and Knight, Michigan;
'Grady, Northwestern; Thurber, Col-
gate; Ray. Illinois; Dortiens, Maine;
and Schomner, Chicago.

"PHORMIO," IS FIRST ENGLISH
TRANSLATION TO BE PRESENTED
(Continued from Page One)
The Classical club further aims to
allow the study of the historical as-
pects of the drama by students, who
are interested in such work but do
not read Latin. "Phormio" has stood
the test of 2,000 years, and offers such
students ample opportunity for ob-
servation of the characteristics of the
successful drama.
As its third purpose in the English
presentation of a Roman comedy, the
Classical club wishes to give the stu-
dents an opportunityto see old Ro-
mans as they really were, a people
thoroughly alive and full of fun.

E

GLASSESY
OUR'DRUGLESS SYSTEM

C. K. DODGE, HONORARY BOTANY
CURATOR DIES IN HOSPITAL
Mr. C. K. Dodge, 74 years old, of
Port Huron, honorary associate cura-
tor in botany of the University, died
here Friday in a local hospital.
He had come here recently for an
operation and was apparently recov-
ering so rapidly that his wife left
for Port Huron. Before she coul .e-
turn, he was dead.
Before coming to this university,
Mr. Dodge was director of customs in
his home city. Upon being asked to
assume the position of curator in the
botany department, he left Port Hu-
ron and held this office for nearly 10
years.
He traveled continually over the
greatel part of the state of Michigan
in search of rare and beautiful speci-
mens for the Univefsity museum, and
through his untiring efforts, he was
able to secure one of the finest private
collections of flowers in this state,
'many of which may be seen today in
the museum.
His death is to be especially re-
gretted, since this year he was select-
ed as chairman of the botanical de-
partment of the Michigan Academy
of Science, which is holding a meet-
ing here this week. He enjoyed the
reputation of being the best field bo-
tanist in Michigan;

mination is the result of years of scientific investiga-
ents.
re the visible results of Optical Science carried out

more.

ass.

IL H. ARNOLD
OPTOMETRIST-OPTICIAN
With Arnold and Co.. Jewelers
220 S. Main Street

-1

K AKLAND
"The Sensible Six"
The automobile which
combines grace of design
with strength and dura-
bility at a fair price.

r Easter Suggestioi
- Candy is the most appropriate gift for
Easter Sunday
The best candy you can buy is Bloomfield'
Yellow and Blue Chocolates
A FEW FANCY EASTER BASKETS

1S

s

. MARQUARDT
GARAGE

Bloomfield'

"".

Excellent
Fountain Service

709

!1

:leaned and washed. I
'anteed. Koch and H

I~aw'

U -

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan