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March 24, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NIGH
SERVILE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 1918.

PRICE TI

Y

SHELLS

FRENCH

CAPITAL

OM

DISTANCE

OF

74

12

I

TAKE GHAMPlINSHIP
W"5TLRN MEET TOPPING'
INSECOND PLACE, -42L-22i
WITH 16 POINTS, ILLINOIS FOURTH WITH
'T[ WITH 7, NORTHWESTERN SIXTH
NDIANA SEVENTH WITH 4
ZES RETURN TO BIG TEN
[G IN 9 OF 10 EVENTS ENTERED
tying Conference Records in 50 Yard .Dash and
es, Also Beating Best Conference Offers
Zoelin Finished Second in Sprint

Existence of Gun Shooting 74"iles
Doubted by Engineering FacultyMen
Professors of engineering and ballistics of the University are highly
skeptical as regards the possibility of the existence of a gun that will shoot
a projectile 74 miles, such as has been reported that the Germans are
using in bombarding Paris.
"A gunt to shoot 74 miles, would have to be a 74 inch bore and more
than 290 feet in length," said Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the engineering
college late last night. "All known modern guns have an effective range of
one mile to each inch of bore. The length is figured from the bore. The
study of gunnery is a highly technical subject, and the opinion of us lay-
men out here in the backwoods is worth nothing, but my personal view is
. that no such gun exists.
"Aerial torpedoes have been mentioned before, but again it seems im-
probable that a self-propelled projectile could be constructed that would
be effective at such a distance. The only two possibilities that I can see
are that the bombs are dropped from airplanes or that the Germans have
advanced farther than we know. The latter supposition also seems im-
possible, for an advance of 30 or 40 miles in three days is unimaginable."
Professors John C. Parker of the electrical engineering department,
and John W. Bradshaw, professor of ballistics were of the same opinion as
Dean Coo ley.

PHJECTILES REACH CAPITAL AT
IINTERVALS OF QUARTER OF HO1
10 PERSONSKILLE15 WOL
BERLIN CLAIMS FIRST STAGE OF GREAT BATTLE IN F
ENDED WITH DEFEAT OF CONSIDERABLE PART
ENGLISH ARMY
HAIG REPORTS STRONG NIGHT ATTACKS
IN NEIGHBORHOOD OF JUSSY RE
Pieces of Shells on Examination Were Found to Bear Rifling 3
Proved They Had Not Been Dropped, But Had Bee
Fired From Cannon
BULLETIN
Paris, March 23.-According to the latest report, the long di
non which bombarded Paris this afternoon was firing from a
about 74 1-2 miles, and was located about 12 kilometres beyond
front.
Paris, March 23.-The Germans have been firing on Paris
range guns.
Since S o'clock this morning shells of 240.millimetres have 1
Ing the capital and suburbs at intervals of a quarter of an ho
about 10 persons and wounding about 15. The shortest distU
Paris to the front is more than 100 kilometres (62 miles).
The announcement that Paris was being bombarded was mad
this afternoon.
Measures for counter-attacking the enemy's cainnon are uaw

YANKEES IN
GERMAN PRISONS

"'-"ing Washington, March 23.-An official
list of 200 Americans now prisoners in
in the German camps made public tonight by
urdles, the state department, records the
a each, death of Charles Hemphill shot while

"PHORMIU"IIST CAMPUS
PRODUCTION FROM LATIN

FOOD HEADS ASK MORE
WHEAT CONSERVATION
DESIRE TO STRETCH SCANT SUP-
PLY TO MEET ARMY
NEEDS

USE

winning tne an
r meet by a
iicago came in

nual Confe
score of 4
second wit
e Wisconsi
i tally of 1

' attempting to escape in September,
1917, and the death of Andrew Camp-
ig bell Murtroy, an aviator brought down
er in 1917.
d The only American officer in the
list is Lieutenant Willis, of Massa-
chusetts, an aviator captured at Ver-
dun in August 1917. He has been in- I
n erned. Evidently he was an officer in
the French service.
r- The list reported by the Royal
2 Prussian war ministry and transmit-
h ted by the German government;
n through the state department to thej
6 Spanish embassy in Berlin and the!
Spanish legation in Berne, contains
the names of Americans captured in
r trench raids, crews of captured ships.
al and survivors of captured ships.
- The list also includes the names of
r_ American engineers caught in the
- German turning movement at Cam-
brai.

Terence's "Phormio," the-play sel- Washington, March 23.-Further re-
ected for presentation by the Classical duction in the consumption of wheat

'arrell's squad of 14 me
it it was composed of star
son leading as the principa
[e gathered three first, mak
of 15 points for the Wolver
he pole vault, Cross of Mich
d the bar at a height of 1
ies. Sedgwick was beate
mile run by Otis of Ch
e Donnelly, Michigan's cap
ied fourth.
Y for the events are as fo

L.
n
I-
P-
1-

(C), first;
Aden{W),1

Sedg-
third;
Smin-

!4

OF ENGLISH VERSION
CHANGE IN POLICY OF
CLUB

IS

-Johnson (M), first;
ond; Carroll (Ill.),
d.), fourth. Time five
>ss (M), first; Kief-
c; Lang (I11.), and
>r third. Height, 11

.),

stein (C),
Forbes
), fourth.

first;
(M),
Time

onds.
hurdles-Johnson (M),
(W), second; Andrews
ellin (M), fourth. Time
nds.
n--Otis (C), first; Den-
nd; Crump (W), third;
fourth. Time, 10 min-
seconds.
- Johnson (M), first;
second; Haigh (M),
d Williams (W), tieda
ght, 5 feet 10 inches.
[auser (Minn.), first;
:nd; Nash (W), third;
urth. Time, 2 minutes,

LANDIS DECIDES
AGAINST I. W. W.
Chicago, March 23.--The plea of
counsel for the I. W. W. for the re-
turn of papers seized by federal
agents in the nation-wide action
against members of that organization
under the espionage act, was denied
by Judge Landis in the United States
district court late today.
At the same time Judge Landis or-
dered the trial of the 166 members of
the I. W. W. under indictment for
alleged conspiracy against the gov-
ernment. The trial was set for April
1.
BROTHER OF ANN ARBOR MAN
RECEIVES FRENCH WAR CROSS
Charles B. Cummings, brother of Dr.
H. H. Cummings of this city has been
recently decorated with a croix de
guerre for conspicuous bravery in
transporting wounded over heavily
bombarded roads after having him-
self been asphyxiated by gas.
The translation of the original cita-
tion which is in French reads:
"Charles B. Cummings, conducteur,
has proven since his arrival at the
front a great deal of courage and
bravery, at the scene of evacuation on
frequently bombarded roads, after
having been asphyxiated by gas on
Nov. 13. He transported wounded un-
der fire when he himself should have
been evacuated to a hospital."
The permission to accept the cross
came from his commanding officer in
a letter as follows: "In care of
Chief of Service U. S. A. I request
permission to be given Charles B.
Cummings a member of my command
to accept the cross of war and a cita-
tion from General -(censored) of
Division of the French army to
which we are attached."

club at 8 'o'clock Wednesday night in
University Hall, holds the distinction
of being the first Latin production to
be staged on the campus in "English.
Having demonstrated its ability to
handle classical drama in both Greek
and Latin in "Menaechmi" and "Iphi-
genia Among the Taurians," the Clas-
sical club has changed its policy this
year, and will bring "Phormio" before
the public in English, in order to in-
crease the students' interest by doing
away with the objection to drama in
a foreign tongue. The translation to
be used has been prepared to meet
the demands of both modern stage and
audience.
Follows Original Stage Business
This change was made with the pur-
pose of demonstrating the acting qual-
ities of the play, and Terence's mas-
tery of stage craft. The handling of
the stage business in Prof. J. Raleigh
Nelson's version of the production
contains nothing original.
Speaking of his translation of the
play yesterday, Professor Nelson said,
"I have merely subjected the play to
the same sort of study which I would
give to any play to be presented on
any stage. The action and the stage
business are not indicated in the an-
cient text, but no one can attempt to
interpret the lines by dramatic action
without discovery that the stage busi-
ness is unmistakably suggested by the
text itself. I resent being accused of
modernizing this little masterpiece. I
have tried simply to interpret it, to
reconstruct the original purpose of
the master."
(Continued on Page Six)

was asked by the food administration
tonight in order that the scant supply
available before the next harvest may
be stretched to meet the needs of the
army, domestic consumers, and the
allies.
Every American is requested to cut
his average ration of wheat by 50 per
cent which would reduce the total
normal consumption of 42,000,000
bushels a month to 21,000,000. This
would give a ration of not more than
one and one-half pounds of wheat
products weekly. Flour sales will

tion.

The wheat content of baker's bread
will be reduced to 75 per centeon
April 14 which increases by 5 per cent
the amount of substitutes that must
be used.
Sacrifice in the wheat ration will
entail no hardship, is the opinion of
the food administration, because the
supply of potatoes, corn, oats and
milk is ample to maintain health.
Music School to Give Summer Course
Practical music, theory and history
courses will be given during the sum-
mer session of the University School
of Music. The courses will be equiva-
lent to a full semester's work.
Albert Lockwood, Theodore Harri-
son, and Earl V. Moore, heads of de-
partments will be in charge, and the
following associate teachers will as-
sist: Mrs. Byrl Fox Bacher, Frances
Louise Hamilton, James Hamilton,
Nora C. Hunt, Otto St. Stahl, Ada
Grace Johnson, and Nell B. Stockwell.

be cut to one-eighth of a
any country consumer.

I

barrel forI

Four Nationalities
Mootet in Debate
Four nationalities were represent-
ed in the debate held by the Cosmo-
politan club last night in the First
Methodist church. The question was:
Resolved, That women students should
be admitted to the Cosmopolitan club
as regular members. The decision
was given to the affirmative, argued
by F. C. Liu, '18, of China and L. Itz-
kovich, '19E, of Russia.
The negative team was made up of
H. G. King, graduate student of Ann
Arbor, and P. J. Klaphaak, '20, of the
Netherlands. A. M. Elkind, '19E, was
chairman of the debate, and the mem-
bers of the society acted as judges.
Following the debate, there was a
general discussion of the question,
which is being agitated as a measure
of the society, but action was post-
poned for the present. Plans for the
third annual spring trip of the society
were made -and it is expected that a
large number of the members will
make the trip. The next meeting of
the society will be Friday night.
MICHIGAN WINS FOUR OUT OF
SIX POINTS IN DEBATE MEETS
Michigan more tnan split even Fri-
day night in the fourth annual Mid-
west debate, although the negative
team which met Illinois at Champaign
lost by a 2 to 1 decision. By getting
an unanimous decision at home, and
one vote at Illinois, the total points
for Michigan are four out of a pos-,
sible six.
The contest at Champaign was very
close, according to a telegram receiv-
ed from Prof. R. K. Immel yesterday
morning, and the debate was unusu-j
ally interesting.
Odessa Doesn't Like to be Occupied
Washington, March 23.-The muni-
cipal council of Odessa has sent a dis-
patch to the Austro-German authorit-
ies to protest against Odessa's occu-
pation, according to official dispatches

Unless the Germans have s
invention, no such range as
is conceivable. The most
guns in action heretofore ha
able to hurl their project
20 miles or thereabouts.
The caliber of the shells
Paris, 240 millimetres, is eq
to about 9 1-2 inches. Th
German siege pieces fire
shells.
Berlin via London (Official
23.-The official statement fi
eral headquarters this evenin;
"The first stage of the gre
in France is ended. We have
engagement near Monchy,
St. Quentin, and La Fere. A
erable part of the English
beaten.
"We are fighting approximx
a line northwest of Bapaun
onne and Ham.
HAIG REPORTS STRONG N
ATTACKS NEAR JUSSY S
London, March 23.- The
continuing with the greatest
on the whole front of the Scr
er, Field Marshall Haig's re
night says.
"South and west of St. Que
troops have taken up their n
tions and we are engaged wit
emy.
"During the night strong ho
tacks in the neighborhood c
were repulsed with great los
enemy.
"Onthe northern portion of
tle front the enemy's attack h
pressed with the utmost deter
and regardless of losses. Ot
have maintained their positio
greater part of this front afte:
and prolonged struggle.
"Great gallantry has been sl
the troops engaged in thefig
this area. The 19th and t
divisions distinguished thems
one sector. Six hostile kttac
beaten off by one of our infan
ades."

The official announcement that Paris is being bombarded n
unexplained until further details have been received. The stat
dispatch that the shortest distance from Paris to the front is o
metres indicates that there has been no breach in the battle line
such as would permit of bringing up guns to within what has
viously regarded as the extreme range of heavy pieces.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT speaks
10:30 A. M-The Imperial Christ
Noon Student Class--How we Got Our Bible
Wesleyan Guild Lecture
JAMES A. BU RfN'S
"Burns of the Mountains"
TONIGHT e.hTONIGHT
7:30 e oc 7:30

e British in
passage of
'the stream

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