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March 23, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TEUTONS MA
F
HUNS CUT

POPULAR APP
CHRMA O

Is

ST WITH WIS-
TWO MAIN

CONSIN

CLASSICAL DRAMA HAS,
OF MOVENENT AND
DIALOGUE

RAPIDITYJ
CRISP i

affirmative team won
sin by an unanimous de-
ening in Hill auditorium
annual mid-west debate.
eginning the debate sim-
;o two main issues. The
ether or not the parlia-
i of government is more
the present state gov-
ch the affirmative wished
the former system. The
was whether the English
he officials more respon-
itizens of the country.

John A. Krout, '18, was the star for
he affirmative, and his closing rebut-
al speech had much influence on the
inal decision. R. F. Matthews, '20L,
nd A. J. Adams, '18, the other two
Michigan speakers both presented very
trong and forceful arguments.
Ray S. Erlandson was the most en-
husiastic of the three Wisconsin rep-
esentatives, while Joseph Beach, the
rst speaker, was more deliberate and
eemed surer of himself. Seargent P.
Vild, although not a striking debater,
.eld up his end of the negative in an
xcellent manner,
Quartette Unable to Appear
The Midnight Son's quartette was
.nable to appear because of the ill-
ess of Robert Dieterle, '21M.
Prof. E. C. Goddard acted as pre-
iding officer of the debate, and, while
he judges were deliberating, explain-
d the attitude of the Law school in
egard to debating. The members of
he faculty believe in debating, he
aid, but they think men should do
his kind of work while they are in
he literary college rather than in the
rofessional school.
Professors H. S. Woodward, ofj
Vestern Reserve university, V. A.
Cetcham, of Ohio State university,
nd C. M. Newcomb of Ohio Wesleyan1
niversity acted as judges.
. HULBERT, '17, SUCCESSFUL
AS DEBATING COACH IN IOWA
George Hulbert, '17, who has been
eaching in the oratory department of
owa State Agricultural college at
omes, Iowa, is meeting with much

This year's production of Terence's
"Phormio," to be given by the. Classi-
cal club at 8 o'clock next Wednesday
night in University hall, is well de-
signed to explode the old theory that
classical drama is a matter of staring
images, moss-covered plot, and fun-
ereal action.
As one of the masterpieces of Ro-
man comedy, "Phormio" is marked by
its rapidity of movement. From situ-
ation to situation the play speeds,
with not a slow moment for either the
actors or the audience. The brief,
crisp speeches of the characters tend
almost to brilliance, and aid consider-
ably in the advancement of the com-
plications which-follow one another in
quick succession.
Ludicrous Situations
The ludicrous situations presented
in this comedy are worthy of a
Broadhurst farce, but the production
is saved from the farcical class by-its
sharply defined characterizations. The
intriguing slave, the hen-pecked hus-
band, and the termagant wife will all
he present to portray th-e dratatic art
of the- old Romans.
This brilliance of characterization
applies even to the minor actors in
the play. Moliere pays tribute to Ter-
ence -for this fact in his "L'Amour
Medicin," a comedy presented last
semester by the French faculty of the
University. The lawyer friends of
Demiphos, in "Phormio," furnished
Moliere with the suggestion for his
consultation scene in "L'Amour Med-
ecin."
Students Slow to
Sign Food Cards
Only 58 per cent of the students
on the campus have signed the food
conservation cards distributed by the
University health service in its at-
tempt to secure the co-operation of
the students in 'the nation-wide cam-
paign being waged by the food ad-
ministration.
The Homoeopathic Medical school
leads the colleges with the rating of
96 per cent of the students enrolled.
The Law school reported 76 per cent
the Dental college 700, the pharmics
67, the engineers.62, the lits 60, and
the medics 19 per cent. Many cards
taken have not been returned to.the
health service. No reason can be giv-
en for this neglect because of the pat-
riotic spirit that has usually been
manifested by all the students.
Perfect Records
Eleven fraternities and seven sor-
orities reported 100 per cent signa-
tures of their members. The fratern-
ities are: Delta Chi, Phi Gamma Del-

March 22.-British soldiers hurled G
der the eyes of Emperor William, Field
eral Lundendorff. The battle was the
the three and one-half years of wa.rfa
At some points the British line has
has been expected by military, experts.
after a gigantic bombardment from grE
ish outposts at some points and attaine
ial report declares that nowhere did
planned.
Regiment after regiment was thrown
fronts and Field Marshall Haig reports
ally heavy.
As a result of the struggle on that par
where the fighting apparently was the
where broken.
As an indication of the sanguinary nE
that 16,000 men and 200 guns have bee
tc
AMERICAN GUNNER c<
TO SPEAK TONIGHT "'

"Gunner" Depew
periences of two y
.France, at 8 o'cloc

tonight, in

his

auditorium.
fort
"Gunner" Depew is an American divi
sailor who was recently released from troo
a German prison camp. He enlisted ber
in the French Foreign legion in 1914, ploy
and relates. an amazingly interesting 1,00
sto-ry of what he did, what he saw, "T
and what he endured in two years of that
solid fighting on land and sea against
the Huns. After seeing active service He
at Gallipoli, he won the Croix de fron'
Guerre. He carries two gunshot line
wounds in his thigh, and has partially activ
lost the sight of his right eye. stria
He speaks tonight under the aus- was
pices of the University Y. M. C. A., adva
and there is 'to be no admission An
charge. "Gunner" Depew is said to the
be a good speaker, and in many places lines
where he. has spoken it is said that ing
his audiences were spellbound. man
"Gunner" Depew describes the ishei
cruise of the Yarrowdale, with its car- of t
go of human wretchedness. His is Ame
the first complete account written by Lane
an American. He describes vividly with
those grim three months in German
prison camps, and knows them as a
man -who has lived and suffered in Lc
them, and who has himself been a es d
victim of their cruelties. in F
the
FACULTY MEMBERS w° "

are

yond the o
ack in the
.ed by the

drive

in the

rsity

raternities

arch

LED
-two
cas-

Hall,
.n C..

ssi

a at °

er ,e

for
ob-

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