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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 22, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U Ur ut.iDui i
BIG PART IN WAR

I

MILITi

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9

.TISTWSC
QUICKI(

SHOW FACTORIES
IN FILLING CON-
TRACTS

igS

Detroit, March 21.-The tremendous
part which th automobile factories
and other industrial plants of Detroit,
are playing in the prosecution of the
war is shown by figures obtained for
the Associated Press by the Detroit
board of commerce. Accordiig to
these statistics war contracts totaling
$600,000,000 have been turned over to
local firms since last April but in-
dustrial leaders and trade experts.
seem agreed that this fact is second-
ary in importance.
Contracts Filled
The, leading spectacle in Detroit's
war drama has been the remarkable
speed with which many of these con-
tracts have been filled. It is believed
that no city in America got under head
way for government work more quick-
ly; kept more free from strikes and
labor dissension; protected its indus-
trial resources more perfectly from
enemy plots, or accomplished more+
when rail and water transportation'
facilities were lacking. There has not

The article in yesterday's paper, re-
ferring to the wearing of officers'
uniforms and insignia by members of
the faculty was erroneous, said Lieut.
George C. Mullen last night. Members
of the faculty are in the R. O. T. C.'
in the capactiy of instructors and are
not competing against the students for
commissions. They are allowed to
wear uniforms and insignia as pre-
scribed by the commandant.
For the first time this semester,
cadets were drilled on Ferry field yes-
terday afternoon. Men drilling with
guns were also taken to the field. The
military authorities stated last night
that the condition of Ferry field is
ideal for drilling purposes. At the
present time the cadets after forming
in companies before the Hill auditor-
ium, will march to the field.
One Enfield mag ine rifle, known
as the United States rifle, model of
1917, was received by the military au-
thorities yesterday afternoon from the
Rock Island arsenal. The rifle will be
used to instruct the cadets in the pre-
liminary gallery range practice.

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A-NING, PRESS-
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been a strike of important proportions
in Detroit since the United States en-
tered the war. Several attempts at
incendarism were nipped in the bud
and there has been no serious fire at
a war products factory.
Conceive Liberty Afotor
Detroit men conceived the Liberty
motor. While motor experts were per-
fecting this piece of machinery, a local
factory, nearly a quarter of a mile in
length, was being built. A short time
after the motor was approved by the
government, it was being turned out
in this factory.
On another occasion, government
representatives came to Detroit Nvith
contracts for $30,000,000 worth of ord-
nance. A large automobile company
accepted the task; spent more than
$1,000,000 for building construction
and in a comparatively short time had
installed the special machinery which
the government had furnished. Man-
ufacturing then became a routine.
Then a proposition was made to
manufacture shells here. Several bmus-
iness men held a meeting, organized a
company, and a new industry was
founded.
Fuel lestrqtions iised
Detroit factories now are getting
ready for their big output drive. Fuel
restrictions imposed by the national
and state administrators have been
lifted, navigation soon will be opened,
freight service is expected to be much
better and the motor truck trains will
continue to rumble eastward. Then
the fear of over-production setbacks
will be dissipated, it is believed.
NUMBER OF SAMMIES' L1 TTVRS
VAIES WITH ANOTNT 0F WORK(

117 Pewil
Ypsilanti
p Suey
:an Di'shes

Phone $244-M
arge of seditious
rbor book stores
Dck or have had
E JIEAS$
IN LIVERPOOL

The first outdoor cross-country run
was given to the cadets in companies
I and K, of the First regiment at 415
o'clock yesterday afternoon by Dr.
George A. May. The cadets ran about
two miles before returning to the gym-
na.im..
Sieei.9 rdes No. Three
4. The following cadets have been
appointed .as permanent corporals in
the companies
First regiment; Company A, A. A.
Guettel, W, W, Hinshaw, A. V, Living-
,ton, J. B. Trimble; company 1, F. H.
Tinsman, J. M. Chase, H, I. Josey, E.
N. Bach; company C, G, W, Keller, i.
H. Marker, J. G. Southwroth, C. C.
Chopp; company D, 1. M. Sutter, R.
T. Monroe, J. 1. Schnitz, J. M. Braude:
company t, A. R. Horne, A. MacDonald,
E. H. Teetzel, J. A. Gross; company K,
Carl Neumann, S. C. Burbx'idge, John
D' Hibbard; company L, R. R. Beards-
ley, D. Borland, C, Smith; company M,
A. J. Sabriel 1. J. Knapp, D, C. Moor-
head.
Second regiment; Company A, R. S.
McNeil, W, Gay, M. S. Kanimerer, E. L.
Emmerson; company B, A. L. Kil-
parick, C 3. F, Bangs, J. J. Kucera;
comnpany C, R. L. Storrer, C. P. Beath,
E. M. Mets, H M. Stephen; company
D, pI, M, Nowlin, H, D. Ketchum, L.
W. Butterfield; company I, R, A. Mun-
ro, 0. B, Campbell, H. C. Keen, W. D.
G. Johnston; company K, H. P. Har-
sha, W, C. Lemon, W. F. Schreiber;
company L, H. Bergen, L. S. Martz, D.
C. Stimson, U, T. Porter; company M,
H, M, Easley, T. 'M. Rybolt, L. K.
James,.
BY ORDER OF LIEfT. MULLEN;
L. J. WILLIAMS
1st Lt. P. O. S., retired,
Adjutant.
Members of the advance class show-
e4 improvement in their drills last
iglt. The men executed platoon
movementa with a high degree of pre-
vision.
" "The military discipline is becoming
better with every drill," said Charles
F. lambert, '19, "The men must study
their drill regulations In order to ob-
tain a thorough knowledge of all move-
ments. Each man will be given an
opportunity to demonstrate his abil-
ity, either as a platoon or a com-
pany commander. The showing that
he makes, while exercising this cor
mand, will form the basis for any re-
ports recommending his advancement
in the cadet corps. In .addition, the
men's attendance record at drill and
their general soldierly ieartng will be
considered."
ponpanes I, K, L, and M of the Seo-
and regiment will be given the fol-
lowing athletic and phyIcal contests
at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon under
the direction of Dr. 'May:
Companies I and K, cross country
run, wrestling; companies L and M,
two-mile run- on outdoor. track (if
weather permits), horizontal bars,
rope climbing, sprinting.
Heavy steel walls have been erected
in the gallery range in Waterman
gymnasium. The pit has been com-

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pleted, and a steel wall has been
:placed in the back of the pit. The
military authorities are now waiting Want a
for the ammunition supplies before that FIV
giving the cadets intensive rifle prac-
tice.
All
WAR STAMP SALE Uni
Tail
SHOWS INCREASE
I 'I~R.0. T. t

.

Vile, former professor
n the Medical school,
.ead of the first hos-
3ritian for American
was opened in Liver-
20. Major Wile ap-
aission in the medical
>on after the United
War against Germany
Immissioned a major
v ordered on active
the first members of
lfy to enter the ser-
tp France, and later
re he organize4 the

With the American Army in France,
March 20.-(Correspondence of the
Associated Press); - If letters from
friend, your son, your husband, your
sweetheart, your brother-as the case
may be-do not come as qften from
France as they should, it is because
that particular soldier is so busy he
actually has not the time to write,
Officers in yarious units whose duty
it is to censor letters written by the
rank and file say that the quantity of
mail that comes to them is tlte best
barometer of how much work the com-
mand is doing.
"If the men are working hard," said
one censor the other day, "not more
than five letters a day will come
through me and they will all be ahort,
If there is just a little work to be
done the number of letters probably
will be about twenty-five, And if the
command happeils to be doing noth-
ing at all-say it is resting after a
period in the line-I may get as many
as two hundred letters in a day to
censor.
Prof, IuinpIreys To $peaiO To Parents
Prof. W. . R.Humphreys of the Eng-
lish department will speak before the
Tappan Parent-Teacher's association
meeting to be held at 7 o'clock to-
iight. His subject Is; "The Bible as
a Literary Source for Children,"

Rf SERTE

inn Arbor have
wilding reserve,
rt of the local
The rolls are
ostoffice at the
:ay.
porting the men
t, and the gov-
nrolled men to
ent work until

The sale of thrift and war savings
stamps is gradually increasing in this
city. The total amount of stamps sold
for the week ending March 16 equalled
$2,094 as opposed to $1,215 for the
week ending March .9. During the
month of February $13,599 worth of
stamps were sold.
Although the state of Michigan
ranks 46th in the amount of stamps
sold, Washtenaw county, and espe-I
cially Ann Arbor, is running far abovei
every county in the state. An extend-
ed campaign is being conducted by
the county committee to reach every
locality they are representing.
A house to house campaign will be
held here this coming Monday for the
sale of stamps with the hope that the
quota may be reached in the drive.
The committee hopes to reach every
resident and to make him an investor
in "baby bonds".
The campaign for the organization
of thrift societies is being conducted
by Mr. Newton C. Fetter, secretary of.
the student Y. M. C. A. He has suc-
eeeded in organizing 22 societies in
Chelsea and is spreading propaganda
to other sections of the county. The
first 100 societies formed will be
known as star societies. Several clubs
are already organized in Ann Arbor
among the children in the ward
schools. The campaign will be spread
among the adult organizations next
week.
Extension Lectures
Prof. H. R, Cross will speak tonight
in Wayne on "Fra Lippo Lippi.

Good

Chinese and American
Short Ord
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