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March 21, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-21

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at

00

DAY

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1918.

PRICE T]

J.

[TINUE
COURSE

DAYLIGHT SAVING
DESIRED IN CITY

GEMASOPE

Whether or not the army stores
course here will be discontinued be-
cause of the action of the government
in closing the ordnance corps to vol-
unteers is still unknown. Past course
classes have been composed entirely
of volunteer men. It is possible that
draft men may be sent here, although
nothing official to this effect has been
received as yet by Captain E. T.
White.
Local officials believe the order may
be only temporary, and will be can-
celled as soon as the 'departure of
more .men for France clears arsenals
and training camps in this country so
that new men can again be quartered.
Approximately 20 men are still de-
tained in supply depots, and have not
yet reported for the course which has
now been running nearly two weeks.
R. o. T. C. Cannot
Wear Trarpngs
Members of the faculty and stu-
dents who are not officers in the ser-
vice 4f the government have no legal
right to wear the insignia of com-

DON BELL, '19, MORRIS PARIS, '19, AND DON T. McKONE, 19L, MEM-
BERS OF MICHIGAN'S NEGATIVE DEBATING TEAM WHICH WILL
MEET ILLINOIS FRIDAY EVEN ING AT CHAMPAIGN.

CLOTHING: NEEDEDFOR
BELGIAN RELIEF WORK,

DEBATING TEAMS MEET
'IN CONTEST TOMORROW

nen in the dug-
ir realizing the
rottle and made
the danger zone

CH
NUS

AN

r per
5s is

:al tinged by war
March issue of the
, copies of which
nong faculty mem-
esterday.
war letters in this
mu Prof. Charles B.
s representative at
versity Union in
B. Shaw, editor of
re are also several
gan men in France
,ns of some of the
r members of the

missioned officers, according to war
order No. 49. Military etiquette and
rules reserve the distinction in uni-
forms to officers in the army and navy.
Faculty men and students who are
,members of the University unit of the
R. 0. T. C. have been making a prac-
tice of using officers' insignia on their
uniforms. Leather puttees and offi-
cers' cuff and braid are the distinc-
tions of an army officer as well as
the shoulder bars. The members of
the R. 0. T. C. regardless of rank,
have no right to wear officers' trap-
pings. All officers' commissions are
issued by the President of the United
States.
G. 0. MIDDLEDITCH, EX-'1$E,
ON AMERICAN CASUALTY LIST
Was Lieutenant In Aviation Corps;
Particulars of Death Un-
known
Lieut. George 0. Middleditch, ex-.
'18E, 23 years old, was killed in an
accident in England, according to a.
cablegram just received by Mrs. Ben-
jamin Middleditch, of Detroit. The
name was also in the casualty list.
The government dispatch failed to
give any particulars. Lieutenant
Middleditch was a member of the
flying corps. He was the second
former Michigan student in the avia-
tion corps to be killed since the Unite"
States entered the war.
Lieutenant Middleditch was a grad-
uate of Eastern high school in Detroa
He also attended the University for
two years, 1913-15, and was a mem
ber of the Trigon club. He won a
commission at Fort Sheridan last
year, and took up service in Scotland.
Lieut. Leigh B. Middleditch, ex-'19*,
p. former Varsity baseball man, was
his brother.

and.

v governmental research
that is being established
dance at the University
as compared with attend-
g previous wars, and the
nions, are among the sub-
ed to the University that
ed. An interesting picture
Dr. James B. Angell at the
taken from an old daguer-
also printed in this edi-

STUDENTS FAIL TO RESPOND TO
URGENT CALL OF CO1;.-
MITTEE
University students did not ,ntrib-
ute their share of clothing during the
first day toward the Belgian relief
campaign which started yesterday
Two city schools, Eberbch and Tap-
pan, had a track load of garments
when collections were made last Pe-
ning, but Xt Harbour gymnasium one
lone package was awaiting the col-
lector. There were only four or five
packages at the Union late yesterday
afternoon. In addition to the cloth-
ing collected from the city schools
there was almost as much brought to
the Huron street headquarters.
Dr. Warren P. Lombard, chairman
of the committee, said yesterday, "We
must remember that the Belgians ha e
nothing. Anything that will help keep
them warm and comfortable is aeed-
ed badly. Bring any garment that is
wearable, regardless of the style N.t
color."
Collections Also Made
Mr. Elmer E. Brooks, Goldman Bros,
the Ann Arbor Dye works, the Swiss
Garment Cleaning company, and the
Merchants' Delivery under the direc-
tion of J. Carl Malcolm are collecting
articles at houses throughout the city.
These companies are giving their ser-
vices gratis as is the Michigan State
Telephone company, which has install
ed a telephone for the use of the com-
mittee. A store room has been do-
nated by Mr. Frantk Cornwall.
The work in the public schools is
under the 'direction of Mr. Herbert M.
Slawson, chairman of the Junior Red
Cross work. Mrs. Herbert J. Gould-
ing is chairman of the receiving, pack-
ing, and sorting committee.
Much More Needed
Although the committee expressed
themselves as being well pleased with
the results cf the first day's campaign,
they stated that many more contribu-
tions would have to be mad? during
each of the succeeding three days or
the desired goal of 5,000 tons of cloth-
ing would not be reached. The head-
quarters will be open from 9 to 6
o'clock, Eastern time, during the next
three days to receive garments.
Disinfecting of the garments is be-
ing done under the direction of Dr
J. A. Wessinger, city health officer.
Arrangements for packing will be
made today.
Reduce Number of Engineer Courses
Several advanced courses in engin-
eering will not be in the curricula
next year because of the curtailment
of the faculty and utilization of equip-
pnent in carrying on government
work, according to the bulletin now
being prepared under direction of
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley.
The courses to be dropped are elec-
tions offered in the past which are not
absolutely essential to a complete en-
Fineering course.
Yesterday Was Warmest of Year
Yesterday was the warmest day reg-
,istered in Ann Arbor this year. The
highest temperature recorded before
3 o'clock yesterday afternoon was 72
degrees.

PROF. IM3IEL IS CONFIDENT NEG-
ATIVE WILL WIN FROM
ILLINOIS
"We are confident that we are go-
ing to win from ilinois," said Prof.
R. K. Imnel, who will accompany the
Varsity negative debating team to
Champaign,. where it will meet Illin-
ois tomorrow evening. n
The team is composed of Don Bell,
'19, Morris Paris, '19, and Don T. Mc-
Kone, '19L, all of whom have had con-
siderable experience in debating and
public speaking.
Paris has had more experience than
either of his team mates, having been
on the debating team for two years.
He was a stump \speaker for the
Speakers' non-partisan party in 1914-
X15. He is a member of the Adelphi
House of Representatives, and was( o~
the winning team in the annual soph-
fresh debate in 1917.
McKone has had considerable ex-
perience in Interscholastic debating,
and was a Liberty Loan speaker in
the last campaign. He is also a mem-
ber of the Adelphi House.
Bell was oratorical delegate of the
high school. at Genoa, 0., for three
years. Although he has never parti-
cipated in formal contests he is well
known on the campus for his orator-
ical ability.
The last practice before the debate
Friday was held last evening in Uni-
versity hall, and both teams made ex-
cellent showings, according to Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister. The affirmative
team will meet Wisconsin here the
same time tl e negative team meets
Illinois. The question on which the
two teams will speak is the advis-
ability of adopting the British parlia-1
mentary form of government for our
states.
LENROOT, PATRIOT,
LEADS WISCONSIN

If the President signs the daylight
saving bill which passed the two
houses of congress last week, it will
not be necessary for the city of An
Arbor to arrange a time schedule for
the summer months. Automatically
on March 31 the clocks of the city will
be advanced one hour. The University
will remain on Eastern time.
This daylight saving plan will be
used until the last Sunday in October,
when the country will return to its
former time schedule. The University
will return to Central time when the
order is made to change in October
The tNo times that have prevailed
in the city for the past several month-
have caused considerable inconven-
ience and local merchants will wel-
come the change. Congressman W. S.
Beakes, from this district, has been
requested to use his influence for the
passage of the bill. The daylight sav-'
ings plan was used in Ann Arbor last
year and proved satisfactory. The
measure was passed by congress in an
effort to conserve light and give wqrk-
ers more daylight for vegetable plant-
. ,
ing.-
Pink Prig let Stop
Downtown Traffic
A wee, squealing, pink and white
pig caused it all.
The scurrying of pedestrains, the
craning of necks, the momentary sus-
pension of business, the stopping of
automobiles, the hue and cry of a bevy
of newboys-all these resulted be-
cause the mellow rays of the spring
sun proved too tempting to a porcine
infant of tender months imprisoned in
a burlap sack thrown in the back end
of a farmer's rig, which was moored in
front of a downtown establishment.>
Piggie escaped. How he did it no
one appears to know. But squeal-
ing his joy and delight he appeared
on the pavement and headed-;down thce
muddy stretch of an alley. So did a
boot black, a half score of newsboys.
a surprised farmer, and a few onlook-
ers, but the piglet had a half block
start and he had no idea of stopping.
The chase continued and so. did Pig-
gie. And he eluded them all.
A half block further down the al-
ley the pig 'entered a building in which
dwells a colored family. It has as yet
not come out and perhaps everyone it
Ann Arbor will not observe the next
meatless Tuesday.

150 MILES
Of RUSS

U. S. REQ
DUTC

MOSCOW IN DANGER 0
LENNE SEAT MA
CHANGED

AMERICAN
DAMPER (

S

(By Associated
Washington, March 20
land's refusal in the fa
threats, to put into effe
ary agreement for resto
chant marine to norma
United States tonight re
Dutch ships in America
the same time Great Br
ing over 'Dutch vesseb
ports.
Total of 77 S
A total of 77 ships of

PROF. TURNER SPEAKS ON
IRISH HOME RULE PROBLEM

French Encounter Ftei
Fighting; Germans .
With Heavy Lo
(By'Associated P
March 20.-Germans
Hungarians are advanci
Baltic coast, probably frc
northeast from Pskov,
Russian metropolis, Petr
reported that the Germa
ating within 150 miles
Moscow is in danger of
attack and rumors anen
of the Lenine capital ar
The Americans on the
have been giving the Ge
of their own favorite we:
iating gas. Four differe
the Germans were gassf
,quiescent attitude of the
indicated that the gas 1
feet.
The French again hav
the fiercest infantry figh
raine, the Germans deli
ous strong attacks, but
.were squelched with sax
es. At several other po
,mans endeavored to
French positions, but ev<
were beaten back.

Says

England Is Uncerjain As To Ad-
visability of aking
Step

:j
l

that a

r

woman,
doine in

is

in

r- DEAN EFFINGER ADDRESSES
e
S FRESH LITS ON WAR TOPICS-

of t
the

nt sur Aire, Dean John R. Effinger addressed the
erdun, where, fresh lits at their assembly held yes-
irses, she is terday in University hall on the war
and children service of the University, and empha-
of northern sized the advantages of a college
mly American training at the present time. He also
rt of France. gave figures on University faculty
-- members and students who have left
RAILED for the service. He stated that there
OF SWITCH are approximately 2,000 men now in,
service who have been enrolled in the
ain No. 176, University since the beginning of the
kson, due to war. One hundred and ten faculty
o'clock, split -members have given up their work
d at the cor.. to enter the army, and 20 others are
i streets late doing research work for the govern-
id either east i ment while continuing their residence
y the wreck in Ann Arbor.
morning. Names of the men who are to irti-
cipate in the freshman debate on
* * * * April 18 in University hall, were an-
* nounced by Mr. R. K. Immel, instruc-
uitable for * tor in oratory. Members of Adelphi
cording to * are: G. 0. True, A. A. Neiman, and

Milwauk.e, March 20.-Partial re-
turns tonight sustain the lead of Con-
gressman Irvine Lenroot, supporter of
President Wilson's war aims, for the
Republican nomination for Uni' d
States senator, in yesterday's primar-
ies. Belated returns give him a lead
of 2,326 more than James Thompson'.
La Follette candidate.
It was estimated by Lenroot's man-
agers that he would come to Mil-
waukee with a lead of from x,000 to
X0,000, but returns from approximate-
ly one-half of the city, indicated that
'Thompson would haY e a majority of
5,000 in the city.
UNCLE SAM NEEDS NEARLY
FIVE BILLIONS FOR OANV
Washington, March 20.-IWith Wil-
liam G. McAdoo and his treasurers fig-
iuring over the next Liberty Loan to
begin April 6, the fiscal statement to-
day shows that if Americans pay their
income tax, Uncle Sam will not need
as much money as was expected.
Nearly $4,500,000,000 is expected to
flow into the treasury between now
and June 30, and from other sources
than the Liberty Loan. The ogvern-
ment needs $8,655,000,000 in that time.

Prof. E. R. Turner of the history?
department gave the third of a series
of Michigan Union patriotic war lec-
tures last night, speaking on "The
Irish Problem and England." Profes-
sor Turner believes that the Irish'
should have home rule, but that the
question is dii cult to deal with dur-
ing the present crisis, and that if the'
people are patient they will eventuallyj
get their own government. He also
believes that much of the discontent
expressed against England is froin
Irishmen in this country who do not
know the present conditions and have
not kept in touch with the changes
made.
"The Irish at present have much
less to complain of than formerly.
They are a great deal better off than
the agricultural laborers of England,"
said Prof. Turner, "but it is difficult
for England to know what to do. She
is anxious to settle the question, and
would gladly give Ireland home rule,
but there is a certain element in the
country that is absolutely against it.
"As for complete independence forf
Ireland, England feels that it is notI
fair to her 40,000,000 people to have
a country upon which she can not{
absolutely )count, adjoining her.- If
Ireland were free, and in collusionI
with Germany, the submarines would
have finished England long ago."
Vessel Sunk in European Waters

000 tons were added to the
merchant marine by the r
ing. Another 400,000 tons w
to the Allied service by Gre
action. Most of the ships w
in the food carrying trade 1:
United States and Europe.
President Wilson's pr
taking over the ships was i
after word finally came frc
that Holland's delayed repl,
jection of the British-Am
mand. The government I
more than 48 hours beyon
when Holland had been re
make a decision as to w
would carry out the origin
submit to requisitioning.
Owners to Be Paid
The vessels will be eqi
operated by the navy depa
the shipping board. The Dl
will be supplemented by
civilian sailors and naval
Compensation will be ma
owners of the vessels as i
law.
"Blue Book Blues" On
D. Knight Mirrielees, '20T
his Union opera hit, the
Blues," at the All-engineel
,oxial smoker to be held
night at the Michigan Un
songs from this year's ope
on the program. Jazz mu
{.urnished by a special orc
a vaudeville act from
,been engaged to perform

1

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