100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 19, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

i

i~ Sir

~aiti

ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SER11VICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1918.

PRICE TH

TCH
DAY;
NINE

D BY NAVAL
AND CIV-
WAITS
ANSWER

FORMER STUDENT
KILLED OVERSEAS
Word has just been received from
the aeronautic department of the
navy that Frederick W. Hough, ex-'18,
was killed March 13, overseas. No
particulars were given in the mes-
sage.
Hough enlisted in the Naval Avia-
tion corps in March, 1917, while a
sophomore at college. He was sent
across in May, and received all his
training abroad. He graduated from
his training class with honors, and
later made a record flight, reaching
an altitude of 12,600 feet. He re-
ceived a commission as ensign and
was sent to Scotland. Letterstreceiv-
ed from him after that show that he
was again in France, probably in
active duty.
Hough was the son of William"
Hough of Chicago, of the Pullman
company, and was a member of the
Chi Psi fraternity.
STUDENT CUNILPLANS
CO ICOMMUNICATION BOXES

Bishop C.
Says

D. Williams of Detroit
They Are Soul of
Nation '

WOEOF FAN CE
BEAR WAR BURDEN

in Continental In-
with Total of
10 Tons
iated Press)
rch 18.- Prepara-
ver Dutch merchant
i ports tomorrow
)nigll,t. During the
vernment expected
celve the Dutch re-
-American shipping
,id they had no in-
the reply would be,
accept the Allies'
isfer of Dutch ton-
erican and British
endeavor to open
an effort to satis-
and the Germans.
G Determined
thoritativetly, how-
g had occurred to
terms of the pro-
or the government's'
carry tht matter
lusion.
ment will take con-
which willtbe pro-
naval guards and
ans and naval re-
pplement the Dutch
ace those foreign
to leave the boats.
iU. S. Ports
oday that there are
n ports of contin-
s, aggregating 470,-
of 130,000 tons are
selons of this coun-
400,000 tons are in
X11 .the vessels ate
dition and include
nerchant ships ever

CLOSER RELATIONSHIP
STUDENTS EXPECTED
RESULT

WITH
AS

Plans were made at the regularj
meeting of the Student council held
Sunday afternoon at the Union to
install communication boxes in var-'
ious buildings on the campus so that
students having matters which they
believe should be called to the at-
tention of the council can be sure that
they will get into the proper hands
and be given consideration.
A committee was also appointed to
investigate the matter of getting
items of news about things that hap-
pen at the University in various daily
papers throughout the country. A
communication in The Daily a few
days ago was the cause of this matter
being brought up.
The council also adopted a motion
stating that it should be made known
on the campus that the regular meet-
ings of the body were open to any and
all students who cared to attend.
The nextameeting will be held Tues-
day evening, March 26.
C. B. Campbell, '19E, R. E. Gault, '19,
B. G. Krause, '18, and R. C. Patter-
son, '18, were sworn in as members of
the council.
The registration of R. D. Smith,
'19E, which has been in the hands of
the secretary for some time, and the'
acceptance of which has been delayed
until Smith was called into active ser-
vice, was accepted yesterday. Smith
left with the naval auxiliary yester-
day morning.
ANNOUNCE, CAST FOR COMEDY
CLUB PLAY; HOLD REHEARSALS

DATE
FFICERS

AUDITORIUM AUDIENCE HEARS
t CLERGYMAN'S EXPERIENCES
Speaker Denies Extravagance Charges
Made by Pro-Germans Against
Red Cross
"The Soul of France is the French
women. Everywhere, all over France,
they struggle on. It is not those who
pre fighting that are the soul of the
nation, but the women who stay be-
hind and suffer. And I believe that
it is the women of France who have
given her the glorious character she
has."
This was the key-note of the ad,
dress, "Three months at the Front,"
given under the auspices of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. in Hill. auditor-
ium last evening by Bishop C. D. WI
,liams of Detroit, before an audience
of more than 1500 people. Bishop
Williams has recently returned from
the scenes of American Red Cross
work in France.
Red Cross- Not Extravagant
Speaking of the American Red
Cross he said: "Every dollar you
give to the Red Cross has the value
of a dollar and two cents in France.
This is because hundreds of men and
women are giving their services to hu-
manity with no thought of remunera-
tion, of finanical reward. There is
none of the extravagances that pro-
German propaganda is wont to accuse
the Red Cross of.
"The American Red Cross operate
everywhere. It supports 1600 hospi..
tals with a ward house full of drugs
and bandages behind every hospital
It supports recuperation stations
where nerve-shattered soldiers can
regain their health."
Red Cross As Essential As Guns
Bishop Williams dwelt at length
upon the importance of the Red Cross
.work, He particularly laid "stress
upon the importance of the Red Cross
work by saying: "The American Red
Cross is just as immediately essential
to our boys as guns. The front line
trench is right here at home. Unless
the front line trench here holds, the
front line trench at the front cannot
hold and the war will be lost."
STUDENTS TO BE SELECTED
FOR WORK IN FOREIGN SERVICE
Nominations for students to enter
the college training class for foreign
service which is conducted every year
by the National City bank of New
York, have again been asked from
Prof. George W. Dowrie of the econo-
mics department.
The class, which is composed of
men from important universities and
colleges throughout the country, will
begin in the late spring or early sum-
mer. Graduate students, as well as
undergraduates interested in banking,
are eligible for nomination this year.
Application blanks and information
in regard to the work may be obtain-
ed from Professor Dowrie. Men
liable for military service in the near
future will not be considered.
Will Explain "PhormIo" at Meeting
Important announcements concern-
ing the coming presentation of the
classical club play, "Phormio," will
be made at a meeting of that club to
be held at 8 o'clock tonight in Room
A, Alumni Memorial hall.
Various phases of the production
will be explained by Prof. J. H. Drake,
Prof. H. A. Sanders, and Dr. 0. F.

Butler. .
Society Features Vocabulary Contest
A vocabulary contest was one of the .
features at the regular meeting of
the Athena Literary society held last,
evening. The contest closed in a tie !
and showed an average vocabulary of
the members present of 12,960 words.
The second part of the evening's pro-,
gram consisted of an oration given by
Bernice L. Jones, '18, entitled "The

HLINS PENETRATE
SOUTHERN RUSSlI
German Adviance Continues Despite
Fact That Soviets Ratified Treaty
With Berlin
TEUTONS CAPTURE NIKOLAYEV
WITH VAST STORES OF GRAIN
Liberated Prisoners Co-operate With
Bolsheviki; Fight Under
Semenoff
(Summary of War Developments)
In spite of the fact that the all-Rus-
sian congress of Soviets has ratified
the peace treaty forced by the Ger-
mans, the advance of the Teutons es-
pecially in southern Russia continues.
In southern Ukraine the capture of
the important city of Nikolayev,
where vast stores of grain were re-
ported to have been piled up, has been
officially announced by the Germans,
who have also followed up their ag-.
gressive tactics in other provinces in
the southern central regions of Rus-
sia.
Action by Japan in Siberia is still
in abeyance and there is no indica-
tion of what may be done there. Re-
ports from Siberia continue to be
grave. Liberated German prisoners
of war are said to be co-operating
with the bolshevik leaders. On March
16 they participated in the battle with
the forces led by General Semenoff,
the non-Bolshevik leader.
FOOD CONFERENCE
TO BEGIN FRIDAY

.ations for the various offi-
the Women's league, Women's
association, and Y. W. C. A.
n announced as follows:
n's league: President, Ada
'19, Doris McDonald, '19; vice-
t, Ida Belle Guthe, '19, Em-
ell, 19; recording secretary,
fetcalf, '20, Kathryn Kilpat-
[ corresponding secretary, Al-
lossy, '21, Lois DeVries, '21;
r, Marguerite Chapin, '20,
Ames, '20; senior director, Lu-
, '19, Hope Ferguson, '19; ju-
actors, Bernice Updike, '20,
anings, '20, Georgia Davis, '20,
mstock, '20; sophomore direc-
n Masters, '21, Cornelia Clark,
n's athletic association: Pres-
,ne Duemling, '19, Phyllis Eg-
, '19; vice-president, Ethel
9, Dorothy Williams, '19; sec-
Eugenia Wentzy, '21, Phyllis
21; treasurer, Sue Verlenden,
y Huffman, '20; senior direc-
cla Pinkerton, '19, Lucile Duff,
lior director, Anna Kirkpat-
Laura Peocock, '20; sopho-
!rector, . Alice Hinkson, '21,
Schermerhorn, '21.
C. A.: President, Hazel Hoff-
, Emily Loman, '19; vice-
t, Hazel Beckwith,''19, Mild-
idel, '19; secretary, Margaret
, '19, Edith Duemling, '19;
r, Kathryn Glass, '20, Marion

SAMMIES ASK FOR
TECHNICAL BOOKS
Six hundred books are now in the
office of the general library awaiting
shipment to the dispa ch headquart-
ers of the American 11orary associa-
tion. They will be held until 1,000
volumes are received, when they will
be sent to the Cleveland office.
Text books were received in abund-
ance Saturday, though there were
more books of fiction. More engineer-
ing books are wanted in particular,
as the demand in the cantonment li-
braries is to a great extent for these
works. Histories and French books
are also .being called for. Magazines
are not wanted, as the libraries are
already flooded with periodicals.
Posters have arrived, and have been
placed in many of the campus stores,
and on the bulletin boards of the
University. With General Pershing's
new order, it will be possible to estab-
lish army libraries in France. Each
transport that goes across the Atlan-
tic will carry a number of volumes
across.
BELGIAN RELIEF DRIVE
BEGINS HERE TOMORRO1W
UNION AND WOMEN'S LEAGUE
WILL ASSIST IN COLLECT-
ING CLOTHING
George F. Hurley, '18L, president of
the Union, and Anna Lloyd, '18, presi-
dent of the Women's league, will rep-
resent their respective organizations
in the four-day campaign for cloth-
ing for the Belian sufferers.
Arrangements were completed yes-
terday whereby both the Union and
Barbour gymnasium will be open to
receive any contributions of clothing
or footwear all day Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of
this week. Any apparel will be ac-
ceptable with the exception of rubber
goods which cannot be shipped to
Europe. Suspenders, garters, and elast-
ic goods of this nature are included in
the embargo.
Many phone calls were received
yesterday by Dr. Warren P. Lombard
chairman of the committee in charge
here in regard to contributions. Any
one desiring further information
,about the matter can get it by calling
1729, the Huron street headquarters
of the committee, which are open 9 to
6 o'clock daily.
People contributing shoes and boots
are asked to wipe the dirt and mud if
there should be any from these arti-
cles. This will save the few people
in charge of the packing the trouble
of going over several hundred pairs
of shoes and will tend to distribute
and facilitate the work.
Arrangements will be made for the
public to be informed of the progress
of the campaign and the amount of
clothing secured each day through the
columns of the daily papers.
DR. J. C. WOOD TO SPEAK
. ON SEX PROBLEM TONIGHT

With rehearsals for the Comedy
club play, "Miss Hobbs," well under'
way, the cast for the production has
just been announced definitely. War-
ren H. Townsend, '18, is directing thej
production, which will be presented
on April 19 at the Whitney theater.
Jean A. Maclennan, '19, will play
the role of Miss Hobbs, and is to be,
supported by Eva M. Herzberg, '19, as
Beulah Kingsearl, Richard A. For-
syth, '20, as Percival Kingsearl, John
C. Cary, '19, as Wolf Kingsearl, Mary
D. Brown, '19, as Miss Farey, Gilbert
R. Byrne, '19, as George Jessup, No-
nah G. Myers, '18, as Miss Susan Ab-
bey, William R. Sobesky, '18, as Cap-
tain Sands, Gladys L. Townsend, '18,
as the maid servant, and David D.
Nash, School of Music, as Charles..
Rehearsals for this week are as
follows: 7 o'clock tonight in Univer-
sity hall, 7 o'clock Thursday night in
the Alpha Nu rooms, University hall,
9 o'clock Saturday morning at the Ma-
jestic, and 2 o'clock Saturday after-
noon in University hall.
Hillsdale Club to Banquet Friday
Plans have been completed for thel

Many phases of the food problem
will be presented to University wo-
men at the food conference to be held,
on Friday and Saturday, March 22
and 23.
The first meeting will be held from
2 to 5 o'clock on Friday afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium with Mrs. Harry
B. Hutchins, honorary vice-chairman
of the Women's committee, Counci, of
National Defense, presiding. The Wo-
men's land army of America, will be
represented by Mrs. William B. Wil-
liams, state chairman of the organiza-
tion, who will give detailed infor-
ination about its work.
Dean Sarah L. Arnold of Simmons
college, Boston, will speak on "Lib-
erty Kitchens in Boston." Mr. Earl
Martin of Ann Arbor will speak on
"Production Problems," and Mr. Wil-
liam Underdown, on "The Labor That
Farmers Need to Increase Produc-
tion." Other speakers will be Dean
Georgia White of Michigan Agricul-
tural college, Miss Sue Hamilton, do-
mestic sanitarian at the University
health service, and Mr. C. C. Free-
man, food administrator for Wash-
tenaw county.
The evening meeting will be held at
8 o'clock in the Congregational
church. Dean Arnold will give the
latest reports on the food question
from Washington. What the city can
do to help the farmer, will be dis-
cussed by Mr. E. B. Manwaring. Prof.
George W. Dowrie will talk on
"Transportation Problems," Mr.
,Charles Kyer on "The Handling of
Food," and Mr. L. W. Bibbins on
"Price Fixing from the Producer's
Standpoint." Dean White will talk on
"Conservation."
A war food sale will 'be conducted
in connection with the Saturday morn-
ing meeting, to be held from 10 to
12 o'clock in Barbour gymnasium.
"Reducing the Price of Substitutes,"
will be the subject of another talk
by Dean Arnold, and Miss Blackman
of Ypsilanti Normal college will dis-
cuss flour substitutes and suggest re-
cipes. Mrs. L. C. Karpinski will be
in charge.
Mandolin Club Needs More Men
Recent tryouts held by the Varsity
Mandolin.club have added several new
members to the personnel of the club,
but there is still need for more men,
especially those who can play guitars.
Freshmen and first year men who
are scholastically eligible may try out
for the club, and efforts will be made
to obtain special permission for them
to join the organizatibn if they are
successful.
Practices will be held at 7 o'clock
every Monday and Thursday night in
University hall, and any desiring to
try out should report at the rehear-

ALLIES CONTROl
FROJMNORT
TO SWITZERI
GERMAN OFFENSIVE NOT K
ALLIES THREATEN TO SI
DRIVE
BELGIANS TAKE OVE
SECTOR IN FLAN
Americans Destroy Teuton Ap
For Gas Raid; Follow 0
Indian Tactics
(By Associated Press)
March 18. - Americans,
British, Belgian and Pori
troops are maintaining their
over the front running from th
Sea to Switzerland.
Artillery fire, at some points
ing in intensity, is reported, 1
Allies have held their own.
raiding parties are everywher
in the enemy's trenches. T
expected German drive has no
rialized and the Allies thre
start an offensive oftAeir oa
West Front Active
There is hardly a sector o
western battle line which is
ing marked by spirited actih
Verdun and the Vosges regil
parently are storm centers whi
events may develop. At Verd
opposing artillery has been ti
ing for several days, and o
day thechorus of the guns has c
ed especially on the right banl
Meuse.
Belgians Reorganized
One of the most encouragii
tures of the war news may b
in the fact that the Belgian
reorganized and ready for bati
taken over the important coa
tor in Flanders. This part
western front has' ieretofori
held by French and British
That the Belgian army which
to be excellent in morale, ha
the French and British forces
tion elsewhere, demonstrates t
past winter has been one of co
tive work, on the part of the
and allied army staffs. The
official report said that attacks'
mans shock troops have been
ed by the Belgians.
Yanks Upset Gas Raid
Heavy guns are battering ti
erican sector along the fro
many shells of large caliber ha
en. Here, however, the A
guns have replied with good
Apparatus installed prepara1
another gas raid on the Am
has been destroyed by Amer
tillery fire, while American
parties, following out their tra(
Indian fighting tactics have k
solute control of the territory b
the hostile lines.
TURNER TO DISCU
IRISH QUEST
"The Irish Problem in Englar
be the subject of the third of t
ion's series of patriotic war le
to be delivered at 7:30 o'cloci
nesday night in the auditorium
School of Music by Prof. E. R.
of the history department.
With the new interest added
long struggle between the In

English by the frequent out
during the present war, the
problem 'has become one of p:
importance. Professor Turne
made a thorough study of the
tion as presented to the Britis
the results of this study, con
in his lecture, will throw light
sitaution for American student
A continuation of the succes
by the first two lectures of th
ies is hoped for by the officials
Union.
UNIT OF NAVAL AUXILIARY
LEAVES SCHOOL FOR SE

"The Reincarnation of Richard
Warrington" is the subject of a story
which will be related by Dr. James
C. Wood, formerly professor of Gy-
necology at the University of Michi-
gan, at 8 o'clock tonight in the north
lecture room of - the Homeopathic
hospital. Dr. Wood in his story pre-
sents some of the most vital phases
of the sex problem and shows a hy-
pothetical domestic tragedy the ab-
surdity and danger of our double mor-
al standards.
Dr. H. Edwin Lewis, editor of Am-
erican Medicine, says: "I feel that a
paper of as inspiring and helpful a
character as yours should have a
much wider and more extensive aud-
ience than any medical journal can
give. No intelligent person can read
it without deriving great and lasting
benefit. Your article carries a mes-
sage that should reach the whole
thinking class of the country."
The geneal public, medical stu-
.dents, and other students interested
in social problems are urged to at-
tend. It is suggested that minors be
accompanied by parents.
;Undergrads Announce Engagement
Announcement was made Sunday of
.the engagement of Delcia M. Gilbert,
'20, to Harte E. Deming, '18. Mr. De-

om, any 'further'
gue officers pre-
at least 20 active
e will be cn-.~

Hillsdale college club banquet, which
is to be held on Friday night, March
29. during the Schoolmasters' con-

The 70 n
the naval a
o'clock yes
land to ent

students

' 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan