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March 15, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rilki IN UAL

W

tings

yn. Yod should

)W and give

us

a

up before the BIG

OL M
MALCOLM BLOCK

Le

N'

Member of Food
Administration

X Walter Annex

X Oren's Serve-Self.

S

Glen

Prop.

.,

and Supplies
i the College Spirit"
S& Coo
Detroit
'O KNOW JUST

RINS RENDER WATER
SUPPLY UNFIT FOR USE,
RESULTS OF CHEMICAL TESTSI
WILL BE KNOWN THIS
MORNING
Although the city water supply had
not entirely cleared up, it was return-
ing to its normal condition when
Wednesday night's cloudburst rend-
ered it absolutely unfit for drinking
purposes again. The nature of the
bacteria present will not be difinitely
known until late this morning when
the culture started by Dr. ;W. H. Em
erson of the hygiene department will
be sufficiently well developed. It is
believed, however, that there are
colon germs in the water again, and
because of the close relatinship be-
tween the colon and typhoid germs
the water is considered dangerous.
None should be used for drinking
purposes unless it has been boiled.
Last night's -drop in temperature
will not offer any relief other than
preventing more surface water from
entering the intake near Barton dam.
Enough water has already run in,
however, to keep the water contam-
Inated for several -days.
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health offi-
cer, stated last night that the city had
been very fortunate in the past inas-
much as no great amount of sickness
has ever resulted from the water
supply even in times of great freshets.
He attributes this to the fact that
the water is tested daily in the hy-
giene laboratories of the University.
This has been done for the last 20
years.
CITY NEWS
Summer gardens for school chil-
dren are being encouraged by the
board of education of the Ann Arbor
public schools and at its meeting Wed-
nesday evening four instructors were
appointed to take charge of the work
which will be done in collaboration
with the civic association. Last year
the work netted substantial results
and this year the board expect that
the school children will be able to
aid' considerably to increase the food
supplies.
The Ann Arbor Civic association
will repeat the shrub campaign again.
this year with a view to beautifying
Ann Arbor homes and parks. The
aim of the movement is to supply in-
dividuals with shrubs and plants at a
nominal cost in order to stimulate the
home beautiful idea.
Open window schools will be es-
tablished in Ann Arbor with a desire
to improve health conditions among
the school children. The board of
education realizes that there are
many students in the public schools
who should expose themselves as
much as possible to open air and be-
ginning April 1 the Thompson house
on North University avenue will be
open. The school will probably ac-
commodate 35 students.
A group of 88 persons represent-
ing several nationalities attended the
night school conducted by the public
schools during the winter months.
The course was designed to give the
foreigners training in English and
problems of citizenship. Several local
employers have commended the
school board'on the results that
have been obtained among the foreign

laborers.
OPERA DEVELOPS SMOOTHNESS !
AFTER SHOWING FIRST NIGHT
(Continued from Page One)
do, and could easily supplant some
of the others in the company.
Robert Dieterle Gets Across
Robert Dieterle makes a very good
male star. His voice carries well,
and his stage presence is pleasing.
His acting could be still better. Paul
Moore, the second leading man, has
improved much since Wednesday eve-
ning. He is not .yet quite at his ease
on the stage.
Mention must be made of Eva Bow-
en and Pauline Collier, who play two
French lassies, or should it be mad-
amoiselles? and make them the best
characterizations in the production.
Besides which, with Dieterle and
Moore, they provide the best comedy
of the evening.
The chorus is to be commended in
several of the numbers, though it
could be better trained, especially the
ponies, who think nothing of getting
out of step once in a while.

LIBERTY LOAN WORKERS
PLAN DRIVE AT BANQUET
COMMITTEES FOR LOCALITIES
WILL RECEIVE THEIR
INSTRUCTIONS
Every district and township in
Washtenaw county will be represent-
ed at the Liberty Loan banquet which
is to be held at noon tomorrow in the
city Y. M. C. A. Committees for the
various localities will be given in-
structions as to the nature of the
campaign. Although the bonds will
not be placed on sale until April 6,
the educational propaganda for the;
drive will begin immediately after the
banquet.
Special pains are being taken by
the committee to reach the farmers
of the surrounding districts. Ques-
tionnaires prepared by the executive
board of the state War Preparedness
committee will be -mailed to every
farmer. A statement from the Treas-
ury department at Washington in re-
gard to this attempt to reach the
farmers says in part:
"The farmer has come splendidly to
the front with his muscles and knowl-
edge of agriculture and has provided
the allies with food. He has been,
paid handsomply for his crops. If he
invests those dollars in Liberty bonds,
he will be making a profitable deal
and at the same time providing his
government .with the funds to pay
him higher prices for his grain and
his corn and oats now in the ground."
Mr. Frank L. Pack, secretary of the
second Liberty Loan committee for
Washtenaw county, will also act as
secretary fortheypresent campaign.
Mr. George W. Millen, chairman of
the committee, will return to Ann
Arbor from California next week to
take over the leadership of the com-
mittee.
On the whole, the play is to be
praised. The improvement of last
night's performance over that of Wed-
nesday is remarkable. At that time
it looked as if the opera would be a
failure. It now seems that it will be
a big success.
There are many weaknesses. The
plot, or lack of it, is the weakest
point. There are not enough lines,,
not enough action, not enough "pep"
in the show. The interest lags once
or twice, which is one of the deadliest
faults of any play. But the music is
good, the acting fair, and the aud-
ience tolerant, and what more can be .
asked?
Free Exhibition of Raemaeker's
Great War Cartoons, daily at James
Foster's House of Art.-Adv.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.

TODAY
12:35 o'clock-Lenten
444 South State street.
7 o'clock-Alpha Nu
ciety meets In Alpha Nu
versity hall.

8 o'clock-Freshman social at the
Methodist church.
8:15 o'clock-"Let's Go!" appears at
the Whitney theater.

TOMORROW
- 12:35 o'clock-Lenten service at 444
South State street.
2:15 o'clock- "Let's Go!" appears
at the Whitney theater.
4 o'clock Russian society meets in
Barbour gymnasium.
7 o'clock-Upper Room Bible class
meets at 444 South State street.
8 o'clock- Michigan-Chbcago track
meet in Waterman gymnasium.
8:15 o'clock-"Let's Go!" appears at
the Whitney theater.,,
U'-NOTICES -
Acts 2, 3, 4, and 5 of "Phormso" will
be rehearsed at 9 o'clock tomorrow
morning in University hall.
Try-outs for the Spanish Students'
club comedy, "Zar Agueth" wil be held
at 5 o'clock today in room 201, Uni-
versity-hall. The cast will be select-x
ed by Prof. W. L. Schurz.
Russki Kruzhok, the Russian so-
ciety, will meet at 4 o'clock Saturday
afternoon in Barbour gymnasium.

'Where
good Ce~gk
Y
CAlfred J. Rtub
I JNCORPORATED

I,..,_

services

I

I

NICKELS
ARCADE

I

IN DETROIT
101 Washington Blvd.

literary so-
rooms, Uni-

a

at

WHITNEY THEATRE

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

j

i

One Night Only

- Wed., March

THE LARGEST MINSTREL ORGANIZATION
THAT EVER PLAYED HERE

Service
Let us demonstrate
to you the full
meaning of the word
'"Service."

GUS

HILL'S

Big uMinstrels
All All
60 *white w Coedias, Snger, Dancers -Whit e=6
--with -
EDDIE HAZIER, WM. H. THOMPSON, JOHN P. ROGERS, JOHN
BURKE, JACK McSHANE, THE MUSICAL CATES
, - and -
THE GREAT AND ONLY GEORGE WILSON
DIRECT FROM THE NEW YORK HIPPOI)ROME
Watch for the Big Street Parade at 1 P. N.
Detroit Free Press Says: "The best Minstrel Show ever seen her
Worth going miles to see.

ACTIVE,

Ieckwear

.

Prices:

25c-50c -75c -

urrr rrr rr r rrrrrrrt urrinrrnrrrrrr rrtuiur rrr ururt rt

- SEE THIS!'

itiness of the new organdie collars and cuffs
women first-

Shoes for College People

piques-

oman who is very much "up" on what's smart-
vn to the charming satin collars which come in
id white, and in a variety of lovely shapes.
Georgette collars, of course, for their filminess
-and every other sort of collar you would

We have a complete line of high and low shoes for both men and women
who want shoes of the highest quality and yet. of moderate price. We are
now showing- our spring styles in black and tan Oxfords and'Pumps. When
you are downtown stop in and let us show you the class of goods which we
carry.
Men's Ko Ko Calf or Tan Shoes... $6, $6.50, $7, $8
Men's Black Shoes.... ........ ... .$4.00 to $8.00
Women's High Shoes. ........... .$3.00 to $8.50
Women's.Low Shoes..............$2.50 to $6.00

-beginning as low as 50c!;

GROSS & DIETZEL

.reets.

mr

119 E. WashingtonStreet

_ ,

id

CLEAN!

A HAT

LET'S GO TO
Nickel's Arcade Barber. Shop

l

D AND REBLOCKED
h a new band
A LIKE NEW
$2.00 or $5.00
RY NAT STORE
i St., next to the Delta
elephone 1792
d and washed. Satisfac-
id. Koch and Henne.-

AND

GET DOLLED

U

FOR
"Let's

Go "

Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
; the Armory.-Adv.

I

alarm cloaks at

~J. L~
Main.

E

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