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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1.2Y U L J tiJI, 1 ri iRl

"--

.e.

"1918" Models!
g Slippers

Evenin

in unlimited
'les. They
it, Black or
h of gold or
r fashioned
nted vamps,
and artistic
red heels.
or Colonial

Y - r 1 f S
y i (
g , , _
k s
/a .
5
_;'
' .
, :
d s r

All sizes
le A to D._

and

alk-O ver Boot Sop
R J. Hoffstetter, Prop.
115 S. Main St.

. v -
y

nts of the University of Michigan
spect our new line of very smart models in
>ung Men's Top-coats
>ung Men's Gabardines
>ung Men's Suits

I garments every one of them.
We advise early inspection.

Fashions

I

Plate of Ice Cream every Day

n o
CR , E A M

MILITARY NEWS
"Candidates for degrees, who after
electing military training the first se-
mester, neglected to repeat the elec-
tion the second semester, must peti-
tion the board of administration for
permission to elect the course, if they
wish to receive a degree," said Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall in regard to the
measures the literary college is tak-
ing to execute war orders No. 49.
Since the Regents have adopted the
war orders, the schools inust abide
by their stipulations, e said. All who
have elected the course must take it
for two years unless they are seniors,
in which case they will be forced to
take it for one year to gain a de-
gree. The authorities have stated that
the undergraduates will be compelled
to comply rigidly with this ruling.
Members of the First regiment, thirdl
battalion, will hold the following con-
tests at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon
under direction of Dr. George A. May
in Waterman gymnasium:
First regiment-Company I, dipping,
tug-of-wa, two-mile cross country
run; company K, two-mile cross
country run, dipping, tug-of-war;
company L, wrestling, .relay racing,
chinning, tug-of-war; company M,
chinning, tug-of-w ar, wrestling, relay
racing.
In giving the companies a cross
country run of two miles, Doctor May
intends to prepare the men for ap-
pearance on the indoor track. The
run this afternoon will consist of 20
laps around the indoor track, the men
alternately running and walking. As
soon as the weather . conditions are
favorable a cross country run, with
the entire organization competing, will
be held outdoors.
Service Ribbons
Ribbons worn by me in the ser-
vice indicate that they have been
through campaigns, under fire, or per-
haps have won a medal for personal
bravery. A small light blue strip con-
taining a white star shows that the
wearer has gained the medal of honor
of the United States. A white and red
strip signifies 'that the wearer has
served in the Philippine insurrection.
A strip of two bands of blue and gray
indicates service in the Civil war. Two
strips of blue divided by yellow means
service in the Spanish-American war.
Red and yellow, blue and yellow, and
red, bordered with blue, shows ser-
vice in the Cuban occupation. The rib-
bon of yellow edged with blue shows
service in China during the Boxer re-
-hellion.
The Revolutionary war was sum-
marized yesterday afternoon by Prof.
A. E. Boak of the history department,
in his lecture before the R. O. T. C.
in Hill auditorium. Professor Boak
analyzed the different campaigns of
the war, emphasizing the difficulties
under which General Washington lab-
ored, due to the system of short time
enlistments then in force.
"Every cadet who has. been enroll-
ed in the R. 0. T. C. must secure his
uniform from the distributing agent
immediately," said the military au-
thorities last night. This applies to
all band men and those who joined
the corps this semester. There is still
a lot of uniforms at the agent's and
they must be issued efore the end
of the week
Twelve iron targets are now being
installed in the gallery range in the

basement of Waterman gymnasium.
The modern communication system is
also being placed in working condition.
The pit in front of the targets was
finished yesterday.
The cadets in the advanced class
will be quizzed .on the assignments
given thus far in "Drill Regulations,"
tonight and tomorrow evening.
Regulation army shoes are still be-
ing exchanged at the executive offices
in Waterman gymnasium. The au-
thorities desire all cadets to attend to
the exchanges as soon as possible.
LAW SCHOOL RANKS REW)UCED;
COL11EGE NOT TO RE CLOSE I)

"'BE POLITE," IS 1
BUREAU WARNING
Washington, March 13.-When you
start out to collect $3,500,000,000, be
polite," is the notice given by the
bureau of internal revenue to every
one of the thousands- of employees
who are aiding in the collection of war}
revenues.
To this end the bureau is having
printed a manual that will contain
suggestions of value to every large
agency which comes into contact with '
the public. Courtesy and square deal-~
ing are essentials that are demanded'
by- the commissioner of internal rev-
enue, Mr. Daniel C. Roper.
Some of the suggestions in the book'
are: "The government representative
should be courteous at all times, have
a cheery manner, and forget the'
grouch, never, under any circum-
stances losing his temper, and hould
avoid all arguments.
"Never put anything over on the tax'
payer, because that is a kaiser-like#
abuse of authority, and the man who
does it isn't fit to be trusted with au-
thority. Tell the tax payer his rights.
The government wants every cent due
it, and it wants the tax payer to keep
every cent he is entitled to keep.
"A man in the field force should
never lose sight of the fact that ours
s a government of the people, by the
people, and for the people. The peo-
ple with whom we come in contact
constitute this government which em-+
ploys us to serve them."+
ANN ARBOR FALLS BELOW firs 1
SQOTA IN WAR STAMPS DRIVE
Anr Arbor is far below her quota
for Thrift and War Savings' stamps.
It is estimated that the quota for this
city amounts to $474,500, making an
average of approximately $1,500 a day.
The months of February and March
showed some increase but the aver-
age has been about $300 a day. Ac-
cording to these figures, Ann Arbor is
$12,000 below the weekly quota.
Holders of stamps are warned not to
cash them unless it is absolutely nec-
essary.
Mr; Newton C. Fetter, secretary of
the University Y. M. C. A., will boost
the sale of stamps at the Union opera
performances tonight and tomorrow.
Mr. Roy J. Jacobson will speak on be-
half of the campaign at the Saturday
afternoon performance.
Gas Rate Commission Is Appointed
In accordance with an application
for a revision of gas rates by the
Washtenaw Gas company, a commis-
sion has been appointed to consider
the advisability of such a step. The
commission is composed of three men,
one appointed by the gas company,
another by the city, and the third by
the supreme court.
Due to the delay in the appointment
by the supreme court, no action has
as yet been taken, and according to the
general manager of the gas company,
the decision may be withheld for an-
other month,
The commission consists of Judge
Victor H. Lane of the Law school, ap-
pointed by the supreme court; Prof.
I. E. Riggs of the civil engineering
department, appointed by the city; and
Mr. Ray K. Holland, appointed by the
gas company.

REPORT CRITICISES
SLOVENLY SALUTES
Slovenly salutes and the lack of uni-
formity in equipment and dress have
been brought to the attention of the
government as two outstanding weak-
nesses of the army in a critical report
presented to the war department in
Washington.
This criticism is especially applic-
able to military conditions on the
campus, owing to the general ignor-
ance in military etiquette of those
comprising the cadet corps. To per-
fect men in the art of war great stress
should be laid upon the importance
of uniform dress and observance of
the salute, which must be executed
with true military bearing and a look
of pride acquired only in the crack
units of the old army, for a salute is
a privilege, not an act of humiliation.
Top sergeants should be especially
careful to see that the fundamentals
of discipline should be carried out to
the letter from the very first, since
-this policy is necessary to enable a
soldier to steel himself on the field of
battle, and neatness of dress is essen-
tial to give the smartness of command
which will prevent lowering of disci-
pline.
Local IV.ilk Prices Remain Unchanged
Milk prices will remain the same in
Ann Arbor for some time, said one
of the local dealers yesterday in spite
of the fact that there has been a
change in most sections of the coun-
try.
The largest raise took place about
six months ago, but the price has been
lower than the rate in Detroit. How-
ever, the price of milk in Detroit will
be reduced April 1 to 12 cents a quart.

IN DETROIT
101 Washington Blvd.

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making the
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who consider Qual-
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in

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IINCORPORATED

Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.

Footwear

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TWO WEEKS

from next Sunday will be Easter, and if you are not planning
on wearing a new suit, you should at least plan now on having
your Spring Garments Cleaned and Pressed and put in order
for use. The time is short and the rush will be great. Better
send in early. Have them Cleaned with-

NICKELS
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GET YOUR
~Books- and Supplies
From the "Store with the College Spirit"
oheehDneCo.
bor Detroit

"'ie }one of 8nergine"
Work Called for and Delivered

S GOING ON

TODAY
clock-Dental faculty I
e Michigan Union.
clock-Lenten services

un-;

at1

>anish club
ersity hall.
"Let's Go!"'"

meets in
appears ata

TOMORROW
lock-Lenten services
Mate street.

at

"PRORMIO" CHARACTERS TO BE
PLAYED BY EXPERIENCED MEN
The Classical club play, "Phormio,"
which will be given Wednesday eve-,
ning in University hall includes men
in its cast who have been successful
in previous campus dramatic produc-
tions. The leading role is taken by
Mr. George D. Wilner of the oratory
department, who has appeared in the
past two Classical club plays, in the
Cercle Francais play, and "The
Magic Carpet." Mr. Ralph M. Carson,
grad., will also play a leading part
When he was an undergraduate he
was successful on the oratorical plat-
form and in many campus theatricals.
The remaining members of the cast
are: Lionel G. Crocker, School of
Music; Lewis Waldo, '18; Mary E.
Oakes, '20;- Robert Monroe, '18; W. K.
Chidester, '20; H. Roger Thomas, '18;
Wilfried R. Lawrie, '21; Albert C.
Jacobs, '21; Montague Pearson, '21E;.
George Duffield, '21, and Geraldine
Brasie, '21.
W. L. Bryan Will Address Seniors
W. L. Bryan, president of the Uni-
versity of Indiana, is to deliver the
commencement address, President
Harry B. Hutchins announced yester-
day.

MUSIC from

"LET'S

aGO,"

209 FOURTH AVE.

PHONE 2508

Alpha Nu
.n Alpha Nu

literary so-
rooms, Uni-

NOW ON SALE

arch.
K-"Let's
theater.

a social at the
Go!" appears at

Scores $2.00

Sheet Music 25c

U-NOTICES
and 5 of "Phormilo" will
i at 6:30 o'clock tonight
S', University hall.

be
in

MICHIGAN'S NEW PATRIOTIC SONG

always an opportunity to
.r business through Daily
Try it.-Ady.

"For

America and Liberty"

MR. AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER:
WISE" to where to take your films for finishing? Per-
r gave it a thought,-Just dropped in the nearest place
he results.
difference Mr. Amateur.
ust one place in Ann Arbor that has always lead all
.y and, consequently, quantity because of this difference.
it to know what this difference is all that you need to
ners know, that we give, and we guarantee, perfect

The withdrawal of eight law stu-
dents to enter the naval auxiliary has
reduced the registration in that school
to about 150. At the beginn-ing of the
first semester there were more. than
200 students in the college, but many
have been called for military service
or have taken up other war work.
Law school officials say that the
rumor of the school's closing next
year has no grounds. One professor
stated, "We will not close the school
because of the small number of stu-
dents, although the fjcnlty may not
be so large next year."

Price 30c

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ative of Eastman Kodaks and Supplies.

T O

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