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March 14, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

at
." at
.9.

opera, at tltt
ay, and Sat-

*
*

I l

Holmes in

Red Gap."
Fanny Ward
Also Mack

in "On
Service

Ierry in *
edy, "A *

ade - John Barrymore in
es." Also Christie Comedy,
Wakes Up.".

AT THE MAJESTIC
'Ruggles of Red Gap," is a typical
stern drama, with Taylor Holies
the role of a ranchman of the wild
d woolly variety. The scenes of the
ture were taken in Arizona, and
production is featured by the wild
.e of Taylor Holmes on the back of
ostrich.
AT THE ARCADE.
rhe thief and the police are the
ef characters in the photoplay,
affles," which will appear at the
Cade today and tomorrow. John
rrymore assumes the role of a so-
ty thief, and an interesting plot is
ven around his adventures in out-
ting the police and amateur detec-
es.
Daily advertisers cater to Daily'
ders.-Adv.
Always-Daily Service-Always.

Chicago Brings
Fast Tracksters
Michigan Team Will Be Practically
Same As That Which Beat
Notre Dame
Coach Farrell put his Varsity track-
sters through another stiff session yes-
terday to get his men in the best pos-
sible condition for the Chicago meet
Saturday.
This entry list for the Maroon team
was received and for war times Chi-
cago will be represented by a fast
bunch of men. The result of the meet
will hinge on the way the Wolverine'
runners in the dashes and the longer
distances will be able to show their
heels to the Windy City men. With
this in view Steve has been priming
his sprinters and milers with an ex-
tra amount of work so that no event
will be lost through lack of condition.
Practically the same squad of men
that went to Notre Dame last Satur--
day will be seen in action against the
Maroons. Coach Farrell was pleased
with the work of the men who made,
the trip to South Bend but is still
looking around for athletes to fill in,
in some of the events where men of
ability are lacking to take second .ind
third places.
Phi Beta Kappa Will Elect Soon
Candidates will be chosen for mem-
bership in the Phi beta Kappa hon-
orary fraternity at the elections which
will be held immediately after the
spring vacation. Registrar A. G. Hall'
announced yesterday that there were
500 students who were eligible as can-
didates but that only 10 per cent of
those eligible could be elected. It has
been customary not to elect even the
maximum number in the past. Last
year there were 650 eligible and only
47 were elected as members. The
candidates are those students who
have had an average of B or more.
You will always find bargains in
Daily advertisements. Read them.

UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS
PROGRAM OF NOTED
SPEAKERS

1

E EDUATIONA BODIES
WILL HOLD CNTENTION,

ON

I

rDay
MJarch 14th

Five state educational bodies will
hold their annual sessions in Ann Ar-
bor from March 26 to 30. They are
the Michigan Schoolmasters' club, the
institute for teacher's of classics, an-
cient history, and literature; the
Michigan Academy of Science, the
Michigan association of superintend-
ents and school board members, and
the institute of superintendents, prin-
cipals, and supervisors of the various
state schools.
Nearly 5 ,000 circulars have been
mailed to teachers all over the state
by Louis P. Jocelyn of this city, sec-
retary of the Schoolmasters' club.
Professors at the University and sev-
eral outside speakers are included
among those who will address the con-
ventions.
Noted Men Will Speak
Professor John Dewey of Columbia
university and President Walter A.
Jessup, of the University of Iowa, will
address the institute of superintend-
ents, principals and supervisors,
March 28, at Hill auditorium. The
meetings of this organization are be-
ing conducted under the auspices of
the University department of educa-
tion.
Military training in high schools,
and the future of German as a lan-
guage in public schools, are among
the subjects to be brought up before
the Michigan association of superin-
tendents and school board members.
Lieutenant George C. Mullen, profes-
sor of military science and tactics, and
Prof. C. O. Davis, of the department
of education, will speak at the meet-
ing of this. institute. Charles A. Sink,
secretary of the School of Music, is
president of the organization. Super-
intendent William Wirt, of Gary, Ind.,
will speak about the Gary system of
education, and Prof. Guy M. Whipple,
of the University of Illinois, will talk
on "Experiments with Public School
Classes for Gifted Children."
University Men on Program
The Schoolmasters' club will be div-
ided into 12 sections, which will meet
March 28 and 29. A number of Uni-
versity professors will talk before
these sections. Prof. John G. Winter,
of the classical languages depart-
ment; Prof. W. W. Florer, of the Ger-
man department; Dr. Abraham Ja-
cobi, of New York; and Prof. Gordon
J. Laing, of the University of Chi-
cago, will talk before the classical con-
ference.
Prof. John W. Scholl, of the German
department, and Prof. C. P. Wagner,
of the romance languages department,
will address the Modern Language
Teachers' association; Mr. W. W.
Bishop, University librarian, the Eng-
lish conference; Professor E. R. Turn-
er, of the history department, andSu-
perintendent of Schools Charles E.
Chadsey, of Detroit, the history con-
ference; Prof. F. W. Pawlowski, of the
engineering college, and Prof. Alex-
ander Smith, of Columbia university,
thephysics and chemistry conference;
Prof. J. B. Edmonson, of the depart-
ment of education, and Prof. L. C.
Karpinski, of the mathematics depart-
ment, the mathematical conference;
Prof. J. B. Pollock, of the botanical
department, and Prof. o. C. Glaser, of
the zoology department, the biologi-
cal conference; Prof. Emel Lorch, of
the college of architecture, and Mr.
Sam Hume, of Detroit, the art confer-
ence; and Prof. George E. Myers, of
the department of industrial educa-
tion, the manual training conference.
Registrar Issues Scholarship Report
The statistics which Registrar Ar-
thur G. Hall compiled in his annual re-
port to- superintendents of the accred-
ited high schools show that 724 fresh-
men entered the University on diplo-

mas, six on examination and nine as
special students. Forty-six per cent
of the students who entered on dip-
lomas received grades of C or above.
The averages were 53 and 55 per
cent respectively the last two previous
years. Thirty-four per cent of the
schools whose graduates attend the
University show good scholarship.
About 50 per cent of the students
whose records were not clear'received
a single D or E, and in the majority
of these cases the low grade was bal-
anced by higher marks.
Spanish Play Cast To Be Announced
Announcement of the cast for the
Spanish play, "Zaragueta," will be
made at a meeting of El Ateneo Cer-
vantes to be held at 7 o'clock tonight
in Room 201, University hall. This is
the first meeting that 4the club has
held during the month.

University men and women will help
Ann Arbor school children make gar-
dens this spring. Ten people have
already volunteered their services for
the spring months, and more students
are needed.
Work will begin as soon as the
weather permits. The supervisors will
direct the plotting and planting of the
gardens. Most of the work will be
done on Saturday mornings, and it is
planned to have the mid-summer work
done under the direction of the surn-
mer session students.
"The work will be valuable experi-
ence for students, since there will be
great demand for such work when they
go back to their home towns, and they
will be prepared to take the lead,"
said Mrs. E. M. Richar yesterday when
discussing her plans for the coming
season.

Students interested may telephone
Mrs. Richar for information.
MAJ EST IC
TODAY
TAYLOR HOLMES
In
" RUGGLES OF RED.
GAP"
The Aumusing Story of an
English Valet in
Arizona.
SHOWS - , 7, 8:30 - SHOWS
Eastern Time
No War Tax
PRICES - 20c-20c - PRICES

3 :'
r..

WuerthThea
Matinees-2:oo, 3:3y
Evenings-6:3o, 8:oo, 9
- Phone-i6o-J
Prices:-Matinees sc; Ever
- We Pay the Tax
BOOKINGS FOR MAR
' Thur-Fri-14-15-Fanny Ward in
Level." Also Mack Service
"Her Romeo."
Sat-i6-Margarite Fischer in
Janet." Also Comedy and
iSun.Monx7-18-Dor thy Dalton
- Price "Mark." Also Keyst
Sedy, _"Dimples and Dangers.

Or

Shows at 3. 7 and 8:3c
i5c Unless Otherw
Thur-Fri-14-1S-John :
Raffles" and Christie
ty Wakes Uip." toc.
Sat-16-Gladys Brockwel
erty".and Christie (
Mon-18-Francis X. Bus
erly Bayne in "Un
and Drew Comedy,
fluence."

.
,,
_
,;,
,,

Mats r

JOHN BARRYI
- in -
"Raff le's, the Amateur C
By E. W. Hornung
IN A SEVEN-REEL SPECIAL]
WHAT OTHERS SAY IS THE]F
EXPRESS OUR OWN TH(
Mornin

ome

$2.50, Sat. Mat.
50c to $2.00
New York
fPASSING

of Ten Dollars

5over~

ly
cim

Dollar Off

the novel."
Wid Gunning-
tifully. Snapp:
pense, action wi
Moves rapidly
twists to" keep
ing to the final s
Exhibitors T
"An - absorbing
seonse ofte wor
attraction."
A Thrilling I
-A Gripping Ti

Two Dollar Shirts
3 for Five Dollars

I

Arcade

TI

I

ams&

Co.

TODAY AND 1

State Street

" .
1

WHITNEY THEA
Monday, March 18

tti
~ - --
stival Tickets
.ock "B" and "C" now being re-
ill be filled in order of receipt.
ock "B" $5.50 each ($2.50 if
' is exchanged) Hill Auditor-
lock A. M. (Eastern Time)

II

.:

~~f-1 MCV FNJClN

MARCH 16

,wsosI
WAR SANINGS SIAMS
h8$VED BY SHE
UITED STATESj
GOVERNMENT

B~5yCJe an
POWER S' TIEATE.

Webster
E.NTIRE
GAIT Y

., _;

J Y J

N-

iv. iU ill find I hiwn

want I

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