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March 14, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-14

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'ROBABLY SNOW
'RONG WINDS

r4131kr1an

Iai1t.

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AN) NIGHT WVIRE
SERVICE

III. No. 115.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1918.

PRICE THREE

ssa Falls; German Drive

On

East

Begin

USE GREETS
AL SHOW OF
I UNION OPER

PERFORMANCE
EN; TICKETS ON
TODAY

WILL
SALE

BE

F HAS MU H VOCAL
) DRAMATIC TALENT
Costumes, and Scenery Good;
relty Song Hit of Production
is "Blue Book Blues"
(1f rk K. Ehlbert)
plause is to be taken as an ex-
a of approval, the audience at
ening performance of "Let's
ist night a~t the Whitney thea-..

of

pa-

he success of the initial
popular demand for a
t performance in ad-
Saturday matinee, the
nent has announced the
. be held that night at
Tickets will be placed
t 10 n'lnor ths mnrn-

Excellent Voices
voices and dramatic ability of
itire cast are of a superior qual-
one Wilber, School of Music, and
't R. Dieterle, '21M, possess .pow-
voices which blend in perfect-
)ny. Marian Treadgold, '20, and
M. Moore, '19, sing with beauty,
and ease.
Characters Well Interpreted
.ona Beckley, '19, and Carl T.
a, '20E, have character parts
they interpret skillfully. Eva
1,'18, and Pauline Collier, School
isic, play the roles of the two
h, maids with delightful grace.
ten Jones, '20, and W. R. Frazer,
portray well the parts of two
y parents. H. P. Bennett, '19,
es the role of the pacifist student
ability.
"Blue Book Blues"
novelty song hit of the show
"Blue Book Blues," by A. L.
, '10, and A. J. Gornetzky, '19L.
al costumes worn by the pony
s and the able handling of the
art in Knight Mirrielees ,'20E,
bute much to the success of the
er.
. Operatic Composition
ach Me How to Say Good-Bye,"
ork of Mr. Weeks and Earl V.
'12, is an operatic composition
:eptional beauty. The voices of
le and Miss Wilber are heard to
advantage in this duet.
Other Song Hits
op a Stitch," the knitting song by
Veeks and Gornetzky; "Youl
Are Bleu," a clever English
h novelty song; "Who Stole the
from Mother Hubbard's Cup-
?", the lyrics of which were
n by Fred Lawton, '11; "When
eatless Days Are Over, Jenny
a lyric from the pen of Ring
er; "The Weaker Sex," an or-
and clever arrangement; "Let's
:he title song of the show; and
tale, "Zepplins of Love," all are
ing of mention.
Dialect Parts
dialect parts of the hpspital
are carried well, and an Italian
ic selection in sung by A. A.
, '20P, with marked ability. An
lian accompaniment and solo by
Larsen, '20, puts local color into
imber.
costumes are unique and orig-
The knitting costumes, the blue
ballet dresses, and the Zepplin
ms are decidedly attractive.
trench scene of the second act is
enic pice de resistance of the
ction. The reproduction of the
;an Central depot is also well

PAUL M. MOOR, '9, AS JERRY, IN
"LET'S GO!"
MjAOR ENIES POWER
TO SUPPRESS HONE
"CLEOPATRA" WILL PROBABLY
APPEAR ACCORDING TO
SCHE DULE
"I do not see that I have any, au-
thorityto suppress the film'Cleopatra'
until it has been shown and proved
unfit for the 'public," said Mayor Er-
nest M. Wurster yesterday when ap-
proached by the Women's club of the
city regarding the showing of Theda
Bara in the film "Cleopatra."
Mayor Wurster stated that he had
hot seen the picture himself and while
he had the utmost confidence in the
opinions of the people who had ap-
proached him concerning the film, he
could not act without more definite
information. .
Manager Not Responsible
Mr. J. I. Wanzeck, manager of the
Majestic theater where the film is
booked, said, "I shall be glad to do
all in my power to satisfy the people
of Ann Arbor in regard to the pic-
ture, for I am in no way responsible
for its appearance in this city. We
take what is sent us and have no
choice in the matter."
Mr. Wanzeck added that tere was
no place where it would be possible
to cut the film, but he invited any sug-
gestions which objectors to the film
could give in making it more suitable.
Picture Passed Censorship
"The picture has been passed by the
censorship boards of this state, and
this in itself, together with the fact
that the picture has never been sup-
pressed in any city where it was book-
ed, speaks favorably for the film,"
Mr. Wanzeck stated.
Mayor Wurster said that he belieed
the name of the film had made people
look at the picture unfavorably..
"There is a whole class of pictures
that I would like to see put out of ex-
istence, but as long as some are run
we can not discriminate between films
of so similar a caliber."
"I shall, however be glad, if I have
overlooked any facts in consideration
of this film, to have my attention called
to any such lapse."
SUMMER SESSION SHOULD BE
BOOSTED, SAYS DEAN KRAUS
"Students in the University are
urged to tell their friends, whether
they are attending some other college
or university, or are in business, to
attend Michigan's summer session this
year," said Professor E. H. Kraus,
dean of the summer session, yesterday
afternoon.
Dean Kraus further stated that the
students who know any one who might
be interested in the summer session.
should hand their names and ad-
dresses in at the summer session
rooms in University hall so that liter-
ature explaining the summer session
may be sent to them. The abridged
announcement of the 1918 session is

REQUIRE ONE CAMP
OFUPPERCLASSMvEN
Specal Dispensation Given Seniors
and Juniors In Military
Training
LIEUTENANT WILL RECOMMEND
GOOD MEN FOR COMMISSIONS
More Must Sign For Summer Work
To Assure Government of
Success
Members of the present senior and
junior classes have been granted spec-
ial permission to attend the summer
military camp which may be given by
the war department for the R. 0. T. C.
The men in these classes will have to
attend one summer camp instead of
two, according to the military author-
ities.
In the future the men who have just
completed their sophomore and junior
years will attend these summer camps.
Provision has been made for students
to attend but two camps while enrolled
in the University.
Recommendations To Be Given
Seniors and juniors who attend this
camp and have done satisfactory work
during the present academic year and
while in the camp, will be recom-
mended for a commission, according
to a statement made by Lieut. George
C. Mullen yesterday. It is a privilege
for the men to attend a summer camp,
and they are supplied with uniforms,
sleeping quarters, and money for food
lay the government while receiving in-
struction.
Camp Required For Commissions
All men who receive recommenda-
tions in the officers' reserve must be in
attendance at a camp during the sum-
mer following the students' sopho-
more year, state general war orders
49, under the provisions of which the'
R. 0. T. C. is established at the Uni-
versity.
The cadets continue the R. 0. T. C.
work during the junior year in the
University and again attend a camp
between the junior and senior year.
Military work in the corps is complet-
ed during the senior year when the
cadets having satisfactory work to
their credit are recommended for a
commission in the officers' reserve.
Special Privilege Granted
In order to meet the requirements
of the times and to enable as many
men as possible to secure recommend-
ations for commissions, Lieutenant
Mullen has granted the special privil-I
ege to the present junior and senior'
classes. The training will be inten-
sive at the camp.
More students must signify their in-
tention of taking advantage of this op-
portunity to assure the government
that sufficient men will gain benefit
from the camp to justify the expense
and the time spent by the men.

Senate Passes Bill for Government
Control of Railroads By 39
Majority
Washiftgton, March 13.-Legislation
to change the system of drafting men
by dividing according to the number
of men in class 1, instead of the pop-
ulations of states, was held up in the
house today with the filing of an ad-
verse minority report by members of
the military committee, and by the
statement of Sherman Dent, that the
measure would not be called up until
after Secretary Baker's return from
France.
This will delay the second draft, as
Provost Marshal General Crowder has
announced that he will not go ahead
with it until the law is changed.
At the time the minority report was
filed General Crowder was before the
senate military committee urging
speedy consideration of the measure
and of another to require registration
of all men attaining 21 years of age
since June 5, 1917.
The senate has passed a bill to
change the basis of apportionment
and is expected to pass this week the
measure registering younger men. The
house committee has already filed a
favorable majority report on the bill
changing the apportionment.
Washington, March 13.-The senate
tonight adopted the conference reportl
on the administration railroad con-
trol bill by a vote of 47 to 8 after it
had rejected and conferees had elim-
inated a provision limiting the power
of the states to tax the carriers while
under federal control. The bill will
probably go tomorrow to the house
for final action. Senator Townsend
of Michigan, voted against the re-
port.
Principle provisions of the bill re-
tained, as the conferees adjusted them,,
are those for compensating the rail-'
roads on the basis of their net in-
come for the three years ending
June 30, 1917, involving an estimated
federal guarantee of about $945,000,-
000 annually; limiting federal opera-
tion to 21 months after the war; au-
thorizing the President to initiate lists,
subject to approval by the interstate
commerce commission; appropriating
$500,000,000 for a revolving fund for
the director general; and placing all
"short lines" within the federal sys-
tem.
Senator Townsend of Michigan, in
the final debate, re-itemated his crit-
icism saying that some of the bill's
principals are "subversient to good
government."

HUNS
TO

MARIAN TREADGOLD, '20, AS MAR-
JORIE, IN "LET'S GO!"
THIRD LOAN DIE TO
BE BEGUN SATURDAY'
ALL COUNTY TOWNSHIPS ARE IN.
VITED TO ATTEND LIBERTY
BANQUET
The publicity and educational cam-
paign for the third. Liberty Loan drive
in Washtenaw county will be officially
begun at a banquet to be given Sat-
urday afternoon at the city Y.' M. C.
A. A committee representing the
state war preparedness board will be
present to help local committees
throughout the county in the organ-
ization of their work.
Invitations have been sent to every
township in this 'county to be present
at the banquet, and prepare to sys-
tematize their plans for the drive
which opens on April 6. Frank Bacon,
'02, and "Roscoe O. Bonisteel, '12L,
have visited many sections in the
county, speaking to local preparedness
committees and helping them in their
work for the sale of Thrift and War
Savings stamps as well as with advice
on the coming Liberty loan campaign.
No word has as yet been given of
the committee's plans as to the drive
.among the students. Prof. 'Clyde E.
Wilson of the engineering college,
chairman of the Liberty Loan cam-
paign among the students, stated yes-'
terday that no permanent decision has
been reached by the committee as to
the course that is to be followed in
conducting the drive among the stu-
dents. Professor Wilson said that a
statement of the committee's inten-
tions will be issued by Friday.
HEAVY RAINFALL
STRIKES MICHIGAN
Rainfall exceeding four inches, ab-
normally high for the short period of
precipitation, according to. the Uni-
versity observatory, fell during' yes-
terday's storm. Late last night violent
lightning accompanied by high wind
damaged local telephone communica-'
tion. Telegraph companies reported
clear wires.
Pedestrians suffered from the flood-
ed condition of city sidewalks and
streets, caused by the clogged drains
and storm catch basic.
Cellars throughout the city were
flooded by the downpour. No damage
other than occasional wire and light-
ing troubles in some sections of the
city were reported at midnight.
Detroit, March 13.-Telephone and
telegraph communication throughout
Michigan was seriously interrupted
tonight by a rai storm accompanied
by wind and lightning. The rain be-
gan falling early in the afternoon and
continued heavily until after midnight.
Senior Lits Elect Council Men
Three Student council men were
elected yesterday afternoon to rep-
resent the senior literary class. They
were A. Gerald, Gabriel, Bernard
Krause, and Robert Patterson.
Hun Airships Raid England's Coast
London, March 13.-Hostile airships
again raided the northwest coast of
England tonight.

CLASS ONE DRAFT
BILL HELD OVER
System Will Make Apportionment Ae-
cording to Number of Men in
First Class

Meeting of Prussian' Soviets Is Po
Poned; To Pass on Peace
Teris
(Summary of war developments
Associated Press.)
March 13.-While the entente all
are "nibbling" at the German. lii
from the North Sea to Switzerlar
but are making little or no serious
tempts to break through or bri
about a culminating struggle, I
Teutonic powers have taken anotl
step in the exploitation of the east.
The advance guards of the Germ
have entered Odessa, the great
Russian port on the Black Sea and I
center of a great agricultural secti
the products of which are desired
feed the hungry peoples of the cent
empires.
Advance Unopposed
The German advance through M
davia and Bessarabia has been *
tually unopposed.
With Odessa safely in their har
the Teutons will have access to v
stores of wheat which can be tra
ported over land or by sea to po
where it can be readily shipped i
Austria and Germany.
But the capture of Odessa will me
something more, an advance over I
route to Persia and Afghanistan a
possibly India, which is to be follow
now that the British have sever
the famous Berlin and Bagdad rot
to the east.
The congress of Russian Sovie
which was t' have convened at M
cow on Tuesday, postponed this me
ing until Thursday. This gatheri:
may be historic, as it will be asked
ratify or reject the pe.ce forced up
the Bolshevik. peace delegates by t
Germans. When the congress me
it is probable that the message
President Wilson to the Russian pt
ple will be read. It is expected
make a profound impression upon t
assembly.
American Sector Active
The American sector in Lorrai
which is now definitely located e
of Luneville is the most active on t
French front. Great artillery c
bats are being carried out by the A'
ericans who have found, by radi
operations, that their artillery f
has forced the Germans to virtua:
abandon their front lines. Two hu
dred gas projectors, installed for t
purpose of supporting attacks on t
Americans, have been destroyed
shells.
The gallant conduct of the Americ
soldiers in the field is reflected
their brothers in arms, the Americ
sailors of the destroyer squadron
British waters. The action of eig
American sailors who plunged ove
board from the destroyed Parker
rescue survivors of the hospital si
Glenart Castle has been the subject
complimentary remarks in the Br
ish house of commons.
The Germans who raided Paris
Monday night did not escape unscal
ed. An official report from Pa:
states that four of the enemy's m
chines were brought down and
trained airmen were either killed
made prisoners.
Camp Davis Wilt be Held As Usi
Although it is not expected that I
attendance at the summer camp I
surveyors and foresters at Camp I
vis will reach the usual standard, I
heads of the respective departmei
expect to arrange the same gene
outline of work that has been follo
in the past. The work is under I
direction of 'Prof. Howard B. Merr

SECOND SELECTION OF
WILL BE DELAYED BY

MEN
CROWDER

HAVE ACCESS
STORES OF WHE

TEUTONIC AOVANC
CAPTURES ODESS
GERMANS MARCH TIROUGI l
DAVIA AND BESSARABIA VI
TUALLY UNOPPOSED

BISHOP WILLIAMS WILL SPEAK ANN
ON EXPERIENCE AT THE FRONT

ARBOR BULL DOGS MUST
BE MUZZLED, SAY POLICE

"Three Months at the Front," per-
sonal experiences during the past
winter with the American and allied
troops, is the subject of Rt. Reverend
Bishop C. D. Williams' lecture to be
given at 8 o'clock Monday evening in

Every unmuzzled bull dog running
at large in Ann Arbor will be sub-
ject to arrest and the owners subject
to fine, according to the ultimatum
issued at police headquarters yester-
day. The city authorities will begin a
spring drive immediately to round up
every offending canine. The ordinance

Hill auditorium, that provides for this action has been
"Bishop Williams is bishop of the in effect for the past four years and
from Detroit, by the Red Cross to work will be strictly enforced this spring
and study among the firing line relief as in the past.
hospitals and Y. M. C. A. dugouts last The ordinance provides that bull
winter. Since his return he has been dogs may remain unmuzzled if they
in wide demand as a war speaker. are tied up in their owner's yards
Dr. Henry Tatlock and Rev. Cyril and are not allowed to run about at
Harris of this city have said that the will.
Y. M. C. A. is unusually fortunate in
securing this war worker. Fresh Lits Announce Class Mixer
Bishop Williams was sent to France Fresh lits will hold a mixer from 2
Episcopal church of Michigan. He is to 6 o'clock Saturday, March 23, in
the author of several -books and a Barbour gymnasium. This is to be
fluent and interesting speaker, as well open for the class only: An admission.
as a keen observer," remarked the of 25 cents will be- charged, including
Reverend Harris. "Those who fail to , the yearly dues.
hear him will have missed one of the The standing committee, composed
most accurate close-up word pictures of the following members, will be in
of the war." charge of the affair: 'George Duffield,.
The bishop will also speak at the Wesley Nutten, Alice Comlossy, Elean-
University Lenten services at the Bible or Spencer, Albert Hitchcock, Beatrice
Chair house Monday noon. Beckwith, and Roy Lounsberry.

amo

now out, and the complete announce-
of awkwardness, ment will be out March 25.
g first-night per-
mewhat the open- Wisconsin Is Champion of Big Ten
gue is lacking in Lafayette, Ind., March 13.-Wiscon-
apping the actors sin pinched the Big Ten basketball
the artistic value championship here today by nosing
n,o ,,,nrl. 24 to+ 18. --

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