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March 13, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND N
SEW

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1918.. PP

CAMPUS CAMPAIGN
HEAD APPOINTED

95,000 CONSCRIPTS
TO BE SUMMONED

AMERI
IGERM

Prof. Clyde E. Wilson to Lead
dent Liberty Loan
Drive

Stu.

Mobilization
First

of Men
Draft to
March 29

to Complete
Begin

I

a j

2OBERT R. DIETERLE, '18, STAR-
RING AS TOM, IN "LET'S GO!1"

ROE OF
(ABL SKIPS "

Vi

IPPING BOARD NOT EXPECTED
TO ADOPT SUBMITTED
PROPOSALS

qI

the scen-
.d Earl V.
nusic, are
the pro-
Veeks has
the spec-
e final re-
Ar. Moore

Washington, March 12.-It is not
thought in official circles that the
shipping board will adopt any of the
plans submitted for the building of un-
sinkable ships. Naval exrerts are
unanimously opposed to the idea, iold-
ing that the adoption of such plans
would involve considerable delay. and
would necessitate from 60 to G5 per
cent reconstruction of vessels new in
service.
Rear Admiral Albert G. Winterhalt-
er has completed tests of the former
steamer Lucia, equipped with "buoy-
ancy boxes designed to make her un-
sinkable," and is now preparing a re-
port for Josephus Daniels, secretary1
of the navy. It is thought the reportl
will be unfavorable.t

nt """ Ln CHANGE DIRECTORS
an import-
Union op- AT ANGELL HOUSE
ed himself

gly pleased

k

'son

lots of opinions about
>ther countries in this
ing we should all do
n quiet and give our
upport to- the presi-
ri Mortimer E. Cooley
y when I was a boy,"
ean, "that fits this sit-
An American fellow
urton went to sea
E years old. At 21 he
ist clipper ship out of
in East India trade.
the Indies on his first
ped at the Cape of
re he heard that our
war with England. lie
;charged part of his
) number of guns and
lf into a privateer.
:cessful in capturing
vessels on his journey
:ht his prizes into the
His friends took trim
ed him how he dared
'You didn't know the
rong of it; you just
'ere at war,' they said.
d that to hear was
concerned his mother.
for her first and find
was right or wrong
ary America-. citizens
ouls in patienee," sail
)ur country h at - ar
to question eit s Ehe
method of co iduc.'ng
should fight, and sight
i our blood ard o.'t
the future sete thc
ethics in the ca-e"
tunities in War Work

Changes in the administration of
Angell house were approved by 'the
board of directors of the Ann Arbor
branch of the Red Cross at their
monthly meeting last night. The res-
ignation of Mrs. Dean Loree was ac-
cepted and the house was left in
charge of a committee of seven, with
Miss E. W. Dean, chairman.
Miss Dean reported that a total of
40,245 gauze and muslin dressings
had been shipped since Feb. 1. It has
been asked that the dressings be
wrapped ready for sterilization, here-
after, which is a recognition of the
fact that bandages made by this
branch are high grade and require no
further inspection.
A class of 12 in special dressings has
recently completed a course of study.
A teachers' course and a course in
standard dressings are now being con-
ducted, and a new class in standard
dressings is to open on Thursday,
March 21.
The report of Mrs. H. C. Adams,
chairman of the finance committee,
showed an expenditure of $375 by the
surgical dressings department during
the past month, an unusually small
amount.
Civilian relief is conducted by a'
committee, Mr. A. E. Wood, chairman,
and Miss Grace Carleton, secretary.
In addition to government appropri-
ations, for this purpose, the Ann Ar-
bor branch-has voted a monthly sum.
A shipment of 476 articles, includ-
ing operating and convalescent gowns,
bed jackets, spreads, comfort pillows,
leggings, pajamas,'and hospital shirts,
was announced by Mrs. Louis P. Hall,
chairman of the sewing committee.
Miss Alice Douglas reported 655
knitted articles shipped during Feb-
ruary and March. Two hundred and
twenty' dollars worth of yarn was
used, and much more could have been
utilized if it could have been pro-
cured.
Purchases Lambs for Michigan Farms
Lansing, March 12.-H. H. Halliday,
chairman of the state livestock sani-
tary board, will leave this week for the
west to purchase ewe lambs for Michi-

COUNTY WAR PREPAREDNESS
COMMITTEE HOLDS MEETNGS
Quotas for County, City, and Campus
To Be Announced
Soon
Prof. Clyde E. Wilson of the engin-
eering college, was appointed yester-
day to take charge of the third Lib-
erty Loan drive among the students.
No permanent plans have as yet
been made as to the time and condi-
tions of the campaigntwhich is to be
launched on the campus. The Wash-
tenaw county war preparedness com-
mittee is, however, holding daily con-
ferences at which arrangements are
being made to use all available means
in making the third sale of govern-
mene bonds successful.
Quotas Announced Later
The amount and terms of the na-
tional loan will probably be announc-
ed 17 a few days, as soon as Congress
has granted the treasury department
the necessary powers to act. The
quotas for Washtenaw county, Ann
Arbor, and the campus will be pub-
lished as soon as Secretary of the
Treasury McAdoo has acted upon the
quotas for the individual states.
Several committees have been an-
nounced by the county committee as,
follbws:
Ray E. Bassett, '13, will have charge
of the distribution of literature and
posters in the city as well as the coun-
ty. Bassett has the assistance of the
local Boy Scouts who have volunteer-
ed their services as in previous cam-
paigns.
To Have Campaign in Schools
Principal Louis L. Forsythe of the
Ann Arbor high school, and Superin-
tendent H. M. Slauson of the Ann Ar-
bor schools, will have complete charge
of the campaign in the schools.
Prof. Clarence T. Johnston of the
engineering college, will have charge
of the speakers' bureau for the coun-
ty, and Frank A. Stivers, '94-'95L, for
the city. Mr. Ray K. Immel of the or-
atory department, will be in charge of
the "Four Minute' 'speakers at the
theaters and other places of amuse-
ment.
TUBERCULAR SOLDIERS SPEND
RAIL FARES; LEFT DESTITUTE
Los Angeles, March 12.-Soldiers
discharged from camps in California,
because they have contracted tubercu-
losis, have spent the money allowed
them for transportation to their
homes and are caught in the state
without any means of support. A
great many of these men think that
California Is the best place to be
treated for tuberculosis, although
California has not sufficient facilities
to- care for her own tubercular pa-
tients.
Because of this condition there is
an insistent demand for the repeal of
the law which allows discharged sol-
diers a lump sum of money at the rate
of 3 1-2 cents per mile, instead of
transportation which was formerly
alvwed
WORK ON UNION BUILDING NOT
RETARDED BY COLD WEATHER
"Work on the Union building has
not been slackened to any great extent
by the cold weather," says Superin-
tendent S. Holskins, who is in charge
of building operations. "The enorm-
ous excavation for the reservoir and
cistern which will supply the swim-
ming pool are now nearly ready for
cementing. The slate roof is nearing
completion, and the mechanical. con-
structions are progressing much fast-

er than was at first expected." AtE
the present time the company is not
far behind on their contract in spite
of the severe winter.
Keeps Men From Political Races
Lansing, March 12.-Jacob -Ferle,
alderman, is barred from running for
mayor, and five other aldermen are
prevented from seeking re-election by
a ruling of Judge C. B. Collingwood,
who holds that the city charter pro-
hibit s such ativity dnrinz anv terml

Selects Needed at Once to Fill
Units for Early Departure;"
Michigan's Quota 5,55

Washington, March 12.-Approxi-
mately 95,000 selected men will be
called to the colors during theAfive-
day period, beginning March 29, ac-
cording to the details of an announce-
ment issued today by Provost Mar-
shal General Crowder. Eighty thou-
sand will be men of the first draft of
637,000 not yet summoned into ser-
vice. There will be 800,000 men called
under the second army draft. They
will be called gradually during the.
present year. -
Details of how the 'second. draft is
to be applied will be made public later,
after congress has acted upon propos-
ed legislation providing for the regis-
tration of youths attaining the age of
21 years and for basing. state and dis-
trict quotas on the number of regis-
trants in class one. In his first offi-
cial statement on the subject, however,
General Crowder assures the country
that no sweeping withdrawal of large
numbers of men at one tiue Is con-
templated, and that care will be taken
to avoid interference with harvesting.
Michigan's Quota 5,558
Ninety-five thousand men now call-
ed, it is understood, are needed at
once to fill up the divisions and other
units scheduled for early departure,
or to take the place of men transferred
from other divisions to make up such
deficiencies. Michigan's quota of this
next. call is 5,558.
8soo0 Called This Year
The 800,000 men to be summoned
this year represents the number nec-
essary to build up all existing divis-
ions, to create all the army corps and
field army troops, to fill out the war
machine for which the frame work
already exists, and to provide a quart-
er of a million replacement troops.
When they will be mobilized, which
will not be completed before the first
of next year, there will be more than
40 full infantry divisions of 27,700 men
each and all the additionals units nec-
essary.
Final Taxi Rates
Are Deided UPon
Final taxi rates for the city were
decided on at the second reading of
the taxi ordinance by the ordinance
committee. A flat rate of 35 cents has
been agreed on, and 25 cents fr all
trips under half a mile. A set of rules
were drawn up for the taxi drivers to
conform to, including the matter of
overcrowding. Cars must not carry
more passengers than they are design-
ed for. All violations of. thes-- rules
will be severely dealt with.
A plan' was proposed by one of the
prominent members of the committee
to modify the expense of a proposed
meter rate. This plan involved the
mapping of the city into districts irom
common cnters. The rate was to be
'25 cents for the first half mile and five
cents for each successive mile. Stu-
dents would have been able in this
case to get to almost any point on
the campus from either depot for 25
cents, and small trips to buildings
near the campus would come under the
35 cent rate. People living far out of
town, however, would have been forc
ed to pay an additional rate. Although
the plan was thought by the majority
to be just and equitable, yet it was
generally thought that there would be
some difficulty in the execution of it.
The final decision was merely a
compromise of this plan and the stan-
dard 35 cent rate advocated by many
of the committee. The rates for
trunks will remain the same as be-
fore.

Giant Sterilizers to Keep Troops Well
New York, March 12.-Ten steriliz-
ing machines, each weighing 8,000

IONE WILBUR, SCHOOL OF MUSC,,
TAKING THE STELLAR ROLE OF
RUTH, IN "LET'S GO!"
GERMANS BOMB PARIS:
34 KILLED, 79 INJURED
66 PERSONS SUFFOCATEDIJN RAIL.
WAY ENTRANCE; MOST ARE
CHILDREN
Paris, March 12.-Thirty-four per-
sons were killed and 79 others were in-
jured in Paris and in the suburbs as
a result of last night's German air
raid.
In addition to the bumb vit s. 66
persons were suffocated through
crowding In a metropolitan railway
entrance trying to take refuge from
the raiders. These were for the most
part women and children.
Of the bomb victims 29 were killed
and 50 injured in Paris and five kill-
ed and five injured in the suburbs.
London, March 12. - Hostile air-
ships attacked the Yorkshire coast to-
night, according to an official state-
ment. The raid is still in progress.
STUDENTS SPEAK TO
AID SALE OF STAMPS
Under the auspices of the oratory
department of the University student
orators will deliver short speeches at
theaters and other places of amuse-
ment beginning tonight, boosting the
sale of Thrift and War Savings
Stamps. Arrangements have also been
made by the War Preparedness board
of Washtenaw county to have patriotic
addresses delivered at the Union op-
era performances..
A Thrift Stamp campaign, similar
to the house to house campaign of the
Red Cross, will be conducted in this
city next Monday, March 18. The
$4.14 stamp will be featured in the
campaign. -
Mr. Newton C. Fetter, secretary of
the student Y. M. C. A. is chairman of
the committee appointed to organize
thrift societies for the sale of Thrift
Stamps as well as for the promotion
of thrift among the people.
Art to Be Exhibited in Memorial Hall
Water color paintings and drawings
will be exhibited from 2 to 5 o'clock
from Tuesday until Sunday afternoon
in Alumni Memorial hall. The collec-
tion will include works of Dull and
original drawings of Seaford.
Local people who are interested in
art are urged to attend the lecture
to be given by Miss Snow in the Ann
Arbor high s9hool Tuesday and Wed-
nesday evenings at 8:30 o'clock. Her
subject will be "Problems of Home
Decoration" and she will discuss it in
relation to interior, deoration and
color. -This lecture is especially in-
tended for members of the Ann Arbor
Art association but' the public is in-
vited.

Up

SECOND ARMY DRAFT
800,000 GRADUALLY

TO CALL
TO COLORS

GERMANS FLEE B:
ATTACKS; i3A
AND CAP
SAMMIES PEN
300 YARI
Bolshevik Forces
Former Hun I

- (By Associated Pres
The Amercian troops hold
tion of the line of battle nc
Toul apparently are makin
to the enemy .territory a pa
daily routine. Followinig
cursion of Monday morning
a bombardment they raide
front lines for 300 yards u
has been customary, by t1
they set out again on Tu
made a successful surprise
trenches south of Ricecou:
Western Front Act
All along the western f
sive artillery duels are con
isolated sectors. The A
again have carried out
raids into German trenches
iens, kiiling a number of Ge
making prisoners of others
raine the French near I
down successfully a stroi
attack, inflicting heavy los
enemy and also taking pri
addition to a.continuation
duels along the Italian fro
considerable aerial activi1
In fights in the air Monda
ians brought down five hos
British Pursue Tu
The British troops in Pa
giving the Turks no rest.
have driven forward their I
west of Jerusalem. Numn
calities were inflicted on
and several machine guns
tured.
The situation in Siberia
is growing more serious.
Japanese government has
decision concerning the m
Japanese troops into Siber
ing to an announcement
Premier Terauchi.
Bolsheviki Defeat See
In the meantime the
forces have defeated Gene:
off, the anti-Bolsheviki 1
compelled him to retreat
churia. Former German pr
believed to be aiding the
troops.
Whether the revolutionis
low Semenoff into Clines
is not known at present, b
ing. has been issued to the
Chinese commander at H
any invasion of Chinese te:
be regarded as an act of w
GR AD RETURN!
HELP MEN "MA
Gargoyle Appears on Camp
Features Michigan 1
Opera

Containing
comments on

sundry rema
"Let's Go!"

goyle will appear on
noon today.
One of the features
Ballad of Ye Olde 'T
the .adventures of an
comes back to the oper
the star female parts
taken by men. He r
covery after an excurs
dressing-rooms in an

Organize For Better Coal Supply ed Ann
Ann Arbor coal dealers organized an respons
association Monday night for the pur- endeavo
pose of securing a better supply of An in
fuel for next winter, and for bringing us girl
about "a more equitable distribution. us girl
This action is in compliance with the the cap
request of the Federal Trade commis- Rober
sion for coal dealers all over the coun- page d:

try to get together.
No definite action

3 l

L1

pounds, said to be
of disinfecting app-,

largest pieces
is ever manu

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