100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 12, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1L1

pr 4iAa

&t it j

ASSC

i

DAY AND NIGHI
SERVICE

r-

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 12. 1918.

PRICEI

ICJ

I

rE

USE, AR-
'S RINK
:0N
BLS
TODAY

MAN ARRESTED AS
ANNOY ER OF GIRLS
David Anderson, Washtenaw and
Forests avenues, was arrested at his
home Sunday evening on the charge
of assaulting University girls and was
later identified by several of them
as the man who made a practice of
loitering on the streets in the vicinity
of the campus and accosting them.
His arrest was made after he had
been followed to his home by some
University students whose suspicions
were aroused when they saw him at-
tempting to gain an entrance into one
of the houses through the window.
Anderson appeared before Judge
W\illiam G. Doty yesterday mforning
and pleaded guilty to a charge of dis-
orderly conduct. This charge was
preferred against him because the po-
lice were unable to locate any one
who would take the responsibility of
signing a complaint for a more ser-
ious offense. He was fined $5 and
costs which were paid by his local
friends who believe him innocent.
Anderson is 20 years old and has a
wife and child. He is being held on
probation by the local police and must
report to the chief every week.
iLET S GO!" PREPARES
FORFIRST APARANC
HOLD COIVEIUOUS REHEARSALS
TO MAKE SHOW SUC-
CESSFUl

AME[RICANS SMASH
GERMA.N TRE[NC.HES
Three Raids on Huns'in Lorraine Dis-
trict Reach Second Line of
Trenches
U. S. ARTILLERY ASSISTS
TROOPS BY BARRAGE FIRE
American Heavy Guns in Action Near
Toni; Italians Drive Rack
Austrians -

N NIO GRADATE
DISLOYALTY CHA9b6f NEW UNIT PERMITS
M NT GR D AErniiin nnnmini rn

Careful JF ei ~tIi ! J .

'MEMIBERS OF
FACULA

EANIEEi N G

lIe rease In Encolkient Next Year
Will Result in Suspeeted Men
Losing Positinm

ruse, the Armory,
are three of the
idered in which to
to be sent here

I-I. W. Gu-J
McGee, rep-
at Washing-
oday to con-

Feed Men
ent wants the
for the entire
have ruled
e the Univer-

(By Associated Press)
American initative has asserted it-
self on the Lorraine front in France.
Three savage raids on the German
lines have been made by the Americ-
ans, who succeeded in reaching the
second line of enemy trenches before
being ordered to return. During their
stay in German territory they destroy-
ed carefully built defenses and picked
up much war material, '
The American artillery ably as-
sisted the infantry in the operation.
A heavy barrage fire was laid down in
front of the advancing Americans and
the Germans fled' before the wave of
infantry reached the hostile positions.
After the Americans had been in the
German trenches for a few minutes
the German barrage fire was loosed on
them, but the American guns answer-
ed shot for shot and silenced a num-
ber of batteries. The American artil-
lerymen used gas shells with good
effects. Near Toul the American heavy
guns have been in action.
Three raids on the British lines
have been attempted by the Germans
in the Ainentieres sectors, but the
British, in spite of a heavy fire from
the enemy's heavy guns, repulsed the
Teutons, The fighting has spread
along the Flanders front, the Ypres
and the Passcheudaele sectors figur-
ing in the official reports. The activ-
ities of the contending armies have+
spread farther south, encounters near
St. Quentin, being mentioned for the
first time in many weeks.
There has been fighting on quite
a large scale on the Italian front. In
the mountain sectors of the line, en-
emy attacks have been checked, while
along the Piave river front the Aus-
trians were defeated in an attempt to'
launch pontoons for an attack on the
Italian lines.
WILSON'S NOTE TO ENGINEERS
TO APPEAR 4N "TECHNXI'

.!

With its opening performance
heduled for tomorrow night at the
hitney theater, "Let's Go!" is now
ing put through the last stages of

es imprac-
Ne them in
armory is
Besides it
to turn it-
necessitate
tate troops
would re-
ffcials at

s ana ndLeutenantI mv
ie Weinberg rink yes-
together with Prof.
hairman of the Univ-
,, and were not favor-
with it. It is be-
that if the water were
main floor which has
r the use of skaters,
put in a sanitary con-
ony would be an ideal

rry field clubhouse, it is
ould form an ideal place to
men. It is a substantial
id so arranged that it would
7 task to prepare it for the
ling facilities would be un-
nd the best of drill grounds
q to it. Philip E. Bartelme,
outdoor athletics, refused
t on its possibilities yester-
ring to wait until the mat-
een more fully considered.
'se will begin the first week
d will last eight weeks. The
t wishes tq coIntract for
onal courses to be taught
men are selected from the
'my for training, it it said.
IUSES HEAVY LOSS
0 TELEPHONE COMPANY
avily laden with wire were
the ground as a result of
sleet storm Saturday and
wind that followed.
ager of the local exchange
otifled that nine poles were
s the highway at Saline.
as were at once laid for
I the wires were fixed ten-
> allow working. Twelve
a total of 30 wires on them
i to the ground north of the

perparation and polishing.
Rehearsals are being held afternoon
and night, and Director Bert St. John
is sparing no effort to make the 1918
opera a production of unusual merit.
Dress rehearsal was held last night
in Hill auditorium, and the final prac-
tice with the entire company in cos-
tume and with scenery in place, will
be held tonight at the Whitney.
Photographs Taken
Photographs of the ponies and the
chorus of two of the numbers were
taken yesterday at White's studio,
and may be seen on display there
within the next day or two.
Tickets for the four performances,
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday
nights and Saturday matinee are on
sale at the Whitney box office. Prac-
tically all of the seats for the Thurs-
day and Friday night shows have been
disposed of, but there still remain a
number of good seats for the opening
performance Wednesday night and for
the Saturday matinee.
Calls Ticket Sale Satisfactory
"The progress of the- ticket sale is
entirely satisfactory," declared Homer,
Heath, '07, general secretary of the
Union, yesterday afternoon. "I ex-
pect that the remaining seats will be
disposed of between now and the time
of the opening performance."
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED TO HELP
CHILDREN WITH GARDEN PLOTS
Several University men and women
have volunteered to plant potatoes and
weed vegetable gardens this spring as
assistants to Mrs. E. M. Richard of
the Ann Arbor school gardens, and
many more are needed.
A special request for volunteers was
made yesterday through the sociology;
class conducted by Prof. C. H. Cooley.
The work will be essentially in direct-
ing children in preparing, planting,
and weeding their school gardens. This
opportunity is given the University stu-
dents for social service work which
will be patriotic as well as educa-
tional.
MARINE CORPS OFFICERS PLAN
CREATION OF "SINGING ARMY"
Quantico, Va., March 11.-"Our
main object," said a marine porps
officer in regard to the organization
of the Marine band, "is to create a
singing army, a splendid idea that has
been put into practice by all the al-
lied forces, and one that tends to
keep the morale of the army at the
top notch of fighting efficiency."
Well-known ballads are sung as a
part of the daily routine, while new

A photographAic reproduction of
President Wilson's letter to Dean 141
E. Cooley on the duty of engineering
students wil feature the March Issue
of the Technio, to appear later in the
month. The photograph is accompan-
led by an article by Dean Cooley, en-
titled "Our Duty." In this, Dean
Cooley comments on the president's
remarls, and dwells on the relation of
the student to the war.
"Absolute Safety in the Air," is the
title of an article by W. F. Gerhardt,
'17E. Gerhardt recently resigned as
instructor in aeronautics to enter mil-
itary service. His article shows sev-
eral types of airplanes, recent pro-
ducts of the war, which are designed
to make aviation 100 per cent safe.
"Elemental Theory of the Gas Pro-
ducer," by Professor W. L. Barger, of
the chemical engineering department,
explains the basic principles of that
device.
REV. DOUGLAS TO SPEAK ON
'RELIGION IN THE WORLD TODAY'
The Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas will
speak on "Religion in the World To-
day" at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
The lecture is the lat pe of the
"World Today"! seri s ik which yap-
ions phases of the pregent ay havei
been presen eq. The leptures IlayeE
been very well attended so far, and
is hoped that n even larger aud-
ience will turn out for the final talk
of the series,

That all charges of disloyalty to the
United States filed in the past have
been investigated and found ground-
less, was the statement made yester-
day by Secretary of the University
Shirley W. Smith. H declared .hat
future charges will receive just as
careful investigation.
This statement comes in refutation
to many rumors that have been cir-
culating the campus the last few days
regarding further dismissals of fac-
ulty men.
If the enrollment of the engineer-
ing school next year does not demand
as large a faculty as that in offi.
now, several men will. be dropped,
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley said yester-
day. The first men dismissed will be
those whose loyalty there is any reas-
on to doubt. Recommendations to
this effect will be included in the bud-
get of the engineering school to be
presented to the regents at their next
meeting.
It is reported that Prof. W. W. Flor-
er of the German department, who
was among those dismissed at the last
Regent's meeting, feels that a mistake
has been made regarding the number
of students who will take German
next year and that a faculty just as
large as the present one will be need-
ed.
AUGUST TO SPEAK
IN PLACE OF WARD
Herman A. August, '19, who won
second place at the interstate North-
ern Oratorical league finals held lasta
Thursday evening, will speak in the
place of Robert Ward, ex-18 winner,
of first place, in the interstate con-
test held Friday evening, May- 3, in+
Hill auditoriu.
Ward left yesterday to join the na-
val auxiliary which he enlisted i-n
some time ago. He is well known on
the campus having been on one of last
year's debating teams and captain of
the team which lost to Chicago a
short time ago.
August was a member of the1
Central league debating team and.
has had considerable experience in or-+
atorical work. He will be one of the+
"Four-Minute" speakers for the third
Liberty Loan campaign in Detroit.1
Because of throat troubles August
will undergo an operation next Fri-
day. It is expected by the doctors
that he will be entirely recovered in+
time to prepare for the contest.
All the contestants from the seven
schools to compete have been chosen
and of these two are women. The sub-
ject *of their orations are according
to reports received here, all war sub-a
jects. The judges will be the heads'
of the oratorical departments of the
schools represented. .
Appeal For Funds to Erect Monument1
An appeal for funds to help in the+
erection of a monument to the memory
of the famous French aviatr, Captain
Guy emer, has been received by ean
J. R. Egngr of the literary college
from the Ville de Campegne, France.
H. Nikolai, 11, Gets Honor Point
Hulda Nicholai, 121, is the second
girl to gain one athletic honor point
for a hygiene record. Perfect living<
for 28 consecutive days composes the
hygiene record.

Word has been received from Wash-
ington to accept all applications from
engineering students irrespective of
age and scholarship for enlistment in
the inactive branch of the naval re-
serves.: These men are to be given the
rating of seamen, second class, but
this is only temporary and will be
changed as soon as the student gradu-
ates and is able to show his qualifica-
tions for a higher rating.
The term of enlistment is for four
years, starting from the-time the stu-
dent passes the physical examination
and is sworn into service. The stud-
ent will not be called until graduation
except in case of great emergency, and
should the war stop before the student
is graduated he will not be required
to enter active servic.
Applications will be received from
9 to 11, and 2 to 4 o'clock' Tuesday in.
Room 259, new Engineering building.
Arrangements are being made to be-
gin enlistment and examinations as
soon as possible, and a recruiting offi-
cer andhis staff are expected in this
city by the end of the week.
Students enrolling in this branch of
the naval reserves will not be required
to take special courses or drill, out-
side' of those already elected.

CAMPUS ORATORS WILL
ASSIST LOAN' CAMPAIGN

STUDENTS PREPARE TO AID
DRIVE AS "FOUR-MINUTE"
SPEAKERS

IN

The oratory departmtut of the Uni-
versity has declared its intention of
assisting the speakers' bureau for the
third Liberty Loan with "Four-Minute"
speakers, and of doing everything in
its power to help further the coming
campaign.
Mr. Ray K. Imniel of the oratory de-
partment said yesterday: "The de-
partment is ready to help the students
in preparing orations for the ap-
proaching drive, and will encourage.
students to participate in boosting the
sale of bonds. I also feel certain that
those able will volunteer their help."
Students Preparing Orations
A number of students have already:
declared their intentions of offering
their services to the city as well as
the county committees. . Some are al-
ready preparing patriotic orations
which are to be delivered as soon as
they are called upon for assistance
Prof. Clarence T. Johnston of the
Engineering college, chairman of the
county speakers' bureau, and Frank A.
Stivers, '94-'95L, chairman of the Ann
Arbor bureau, are formulating plans
of sending out "Four-Minute" speak-
ers throughout the city and county
and are prepared to make use of the
help offered them by the oratory de-
partment.
Will Announce Commiees
Complete lists of county and city
committees for the campaiga will be
announced this week. A general chair-
man to take charge of the work among
the students will also be appoiutEl i-i
a few days
Roscoe 0. onisteel, '12L, acting or-
ganizer of the Washtenaw county War
Preparedness comrnittee, sa - yester-
eay: "In conoiie ing the nampaign for
the third Liberlr Loan in this county
the same plan s vil be followed as
durig the se- ,:td Lun tdr'tve. There
:ay be aev n xl ob'wgea made Il.ile
pn.isonnel at ,ho committees. but there
will be no other li:a' r'al changes out-
: de of this."
. B. WHELAN, REPUBLICAN
LEADER, DIES IN DETROIT

Sends Message,
The United States now re
no government in Russia,
President cabled his message
American counsul at Moscow
livery tomorrow to the congres
is made up of soldiers and v
representatives and speaks
least a considerable part of tI
ian people.
"Although the government
United State is, unhappily not
a position to render the direct
fective aid, it would wish to
the President's message said,
to assure the people of Russia
the congress that it will ava
of every opportunity to sec
Russia complete sovereignity
dependence in her own affa
for restoration to her great
the life of Europe and the
world. The whole heart of t
pie of the United States is R
people of Russia in the attempi
themselves from autocratic
ment and become the masters
own life."
Indicates Purpose
Thus in his first formal v
Russia since the revolution toi
try under the leadership of t
sheviki deserted the Allied ca
President indicates the purpos
United States to disregard t.
terms upon which the Germ
Austrian war lords have p
peace to the Russians and to
an accounting upon a very d
basis when victory at last s
achieved by America and the
-t'he President does not u:
soviets to reject the peace
though the delivery of his mes
this time may be interpreted
gesting such a course.
REPORT GERMAN CO-OPERL
WITH BOLSHEVIKI IN S)
Washington, March 11.-Offi
ports of German co-operatic
certain Bolsheviki elements in
gave a new turn today to the 1
of Japanese intervention in
Russia.
On the heels of detailed info
showing Nikolai Lenine, the
vik premier, working with tl
mans against the best interest
Allies, the war department m
following statement today:
"In Siberia, it is reported tha
er German war prisoners are
and drilling in the vicinity of I
and that throughout Siberia
and Austrian prisoners of war
ing assisted by certain Russi
ments."
This has been the claim of
in explaining her alarm at th
ing menace in Siberia. While
creasing activity of the Bc
leaders to break proposed or
to the German advance and

RUSSIA OF H
FROM MERI1
PRESIDENT PLEDGES U. S.
COUNTRY IN DRIVING
AUTOCRACY
SENDS MESSAGE 'T
COUNCIL OF SO
Executive Does Not Urge Upo
Rejection of Germany's I
Terms
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 11.-On
of the gathering at Moscow
Russian congress of soviets
to pass judgment on the the
made peace accepted by the
viki the President has sent a
of sympathy to the Russian
through the congress, with
that the United States will av
of every opportunity to aid
driving out autocracy and i
Russia to her place in the wc
complete sovereignity and it
ency.

t the financial loss-
elephone company
sands of dollars.
Speak Thursday
)f clerks in large
as an occupation
will be the subject
darv Grosvenor at

U ~

John B, Whelan, late collector of
customs who died at Detroit Saturday,
will be buried this afternoon with the
Detroit Commandery in charge of the
funeral services. Mr. Whelan attend-
ed the literary department from 1880
to 1882, although he never graduated
from here.
Mr. Whelan was a leader in Republi-
can politics at Detroit, holding in
turn the 'offices of assistant prosecut-
in attorney, justice of the police court,
police commissioner, and collector of
internal revenue. After leaving the
University, he studied law in the offic-
es of several leading Detroit attorneys
1 .,. .. - .s.i -A ~+, - - 1

TODAY 4:15 P. M.

Lloyd Ce Douglas
on

their
Io +1

Religious Phase of the World Today

4

Hall

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan