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March 08, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-08

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MILITARY NEWS

T C

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TWO YEARS TRAINING REVEALS
WHETHER STUDENT IS
QUALIFIED
"Cadets in the R. O. T. C. are being
taught to forsee the demands on an.
officer and an enlisted .nan," said
Lieut. George C. Mullen in an inter-
view yesterday afternoon. "At the
expiration of two years training in
military work in the University each
cadet should be capable of knowing
why every man can not be an officer.
"When the West Point captain'jump-
ed out of the trenches with a hand
full of men during a recent engage-
ment on the western front, a marked
contrast was shown between a real
officer and an enlisted man. An officer
must possess a keen intellect and
capable of judging accurately all the
facts of the case.
Results Not Known
"No one knows definitely what the
effect was, and the newspapers would
not publish the facts, even if they
knew the circums'tances. It is one of
the many incidents that occur in every
war, for the facts have to undergo a
slow filtering process before the en-
time string of evidence can be
brought to the light.
"I do not want to cast any reflec-
tions on the officer," Lieutenant Mul-
len said, "but I want to point out
the probable reason for his actions.
At that time he was probably hard
pressed, and he saw that by collect-
ing his men, jumping out of the
trenches, and stationing a xachine
gun or two in strategic positins, the
raid would be broken up and a few
hundred prisoners taken.
]u'st Think Quickly
"The captain was not only putting
his own life in danger, but also those
of his men. This is the one thing
that every officer must realize before
risking precious lives. An officer has
to think quickly, and act immediately.
An enlisted man simply follows the
orders of his superior.
"I presume that the advantage of-
fered itself quickly.hHe could either
obtain the sanction. of his superior
officer, or act as his intelligence told
him. If he went to his superior offi-
ce, the time for immediate action
might be too short, and I again pre-
sume that it was. Therefore, he took
the matter in his own hands and went
over the top with a few men.-.
R. . T. C. Advantages
"This is exactly the kind of train-
ing that the cadets are endeavoring
to learn," continued Lieutenant Mul-
len. "Each cadet must know and
thoroughly understand the immense
number of responsibilities placed on
his shoulders, and after a quick
analysis of the facts, make the best
judgments his ability allows him. The
man who is capable of making the
best and most accurate decisions
makes the best and most efficient
officer."
Choice Bits From
C ollege .Exchanges
Among the organizations at Oberlin
is a new one called "The Unpopular
Club" and its requirements for mem-
bership give the impression- that the
club will be very exclusive.
For the first time in 25 years a wo-
man won the oratorical contest at the
University of Wisconsin. The winner
was Miss Helen B. Smith, '19, daughter
of Prof. L. S. Smith of the College of
Engineering.' Her topic was, "Women
and the War."
Seniors at the University of llin-

ois are working to raise $1,000 among
the members of their class to com-
plete the funds started by- the past
few Senior classes, which will
be used to 'purchase chimes. The
minimum contribution this year is
fixed at three dollars, which is-some-
what higher than previous years due
to the decrease in number of the class.
If this year's class raises the desired
amount the chimes will be ordered at
once.

Unless a large number g students
apply immediately the project for
holding a military camp this summer
by the University will have to be drop-
ped. A few cadets handed in their
names to thecompany commanders,
and the remainder of the R. O. T. C.
men, as well as sophomores, juniors,
and seniors, who desire to attend the
camp, must hand in their names at
once to the company commanders or
to Lieut. George C. Mullen.
s More than 160 men are now attend-
ing the series of advance drills on
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Fri-
day evenings which are conducted by
Acting Adjutant of the First regiment,
Charles F. Lambert. The class is pro-
gressing rapidly and the men are
showing improvement. -Nightly drills
out of doors will be held as soon as
the weather permits. All cadets at-
tending the advanced class are re-
quested to wear their uniforms.
Cadets who have received "incom-
plete" on their military reports should
see that their record is made clear by
12 o'clock tomorrow morning. After
tomorrow the "incompletes" will be
changed to "not passed" and the cad-
et will lose credit for a semester's
training.
Walter R. Payne, ex-'19, recently
received the commission of second
lieutenant in the ordnance reserve
corps at Camp Meade, Md. Payne was
graduated from the first ordnance
course given by the University, and is
now on his way to te arsenal at Aug-
usta, Ga., where he has been appoint-
ed as an instructor. 'While attending
the University, he was on the business
staff of the Michigan Daily.
Make-up drills will be held from 9
to 11 o'clock tomorrow morning in
Waterman gymnasium. This will be
the final chance to make-up all back
work for the first semester.
Work is progressing rapidly on the
new gallery range. The workmen have
torn out several partitions in the ar-
mory in the basement of the gymna-
sium. The range will probably be
completed for the first class next
Thursday afternoon.
Hand grenades will be ordered this
week for the cadets. A class of hand
grenade throwing will be conducted as
soon as the weather permits. The
grenades are of the same size ap-d
weight as those used in the regular
United States army cantonments.
Dr. George A. May will give the fol-
lowing athletic and gymnastic con-
tests to the cadets of the Second regi-
ment at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon:
Second regiment: Company I, .re-
lay racing, chinning, tug-of-war;
company K, chinning, tug-of-war, re-
lay racing; company L, dipping, tug-
of-war, relay racing; company M, re-
lay racing, dipping, tug-of-war.
The winner is to receive a prize of
five dollars.
Senator James A. Smith, formerly
trustee of Grinnell college, bequeathed
$35,000 to the college in his will,
which has just been probated.
Five University of Washington wo-
men, who were recently accepted as
telephone operators for service in
France, just received orders to start
for San Francisco Thursday evening
where they will spend a month in a
training school.

.Of the 110 men who graduated in
June, 1917 from Williams college, 95
are now either in the army or navy,
and all are seeing active service.
All men who sign up for military
training at the University of Pennsyl-
vania, will have their names placed
on the new eighty-foot flagpole which
has been erected on the campus.
Following the movement of the fra-
ternities in asking for permission to
initiate freshmen, the soirorities of
Ohio State university areseeking the
same privilege. The feeling prevails
that the advantages of initiation dur-
ing the freshman year outweigh the
disadvantages.

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important function of the advertise-
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between a need and a trade name.
The clever advetirser these days, says
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when a certain commodity is wanted!
the advertised name inevitably fol-
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Can Be Too Artistic
The most attractive advertisements
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their object. It has been demonstrat-
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Sometime, Mr. Adams says, he hopes
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DEAN TO INSTRUCT
IN , REGISTRATION
Beginning Monday, March 11, and
continuing for three days, classes in
registration will be held at Barbour
gymnasium at 5 o'clock to instruct
University women so that they may
assist in the general registration of,
all the college women which comes
March 18.
Dean Agnes Wells expects a 100 per
cent response to the call to register,
and has absolute faith that the wo-
men of Michigan will respond heroi-

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Poets and
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would-be poets of the
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t Universityor vinois are pushy wr -
tl ing hymns of hate for the contest car-
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cahly and solidly.
Mrs. Frederick B. Perkins, state
director of registration of the Wo-
men's Defense committee, said, in re-
ferring to the 4proposed enlistment of
women's services, this great plan
for registration and mobilization of Hot
the women of our country is a most
worthy conception of the most pro-
gressive nation of the world. We can Phone 9
find in all history no account of a
census taking' of either men or wo-
men, of such scope. Every woman
who is loyal to our country is asked to T t
register, including girls 16 years of
age and over. "The girl-power of to- I
'day will be the woman-power of to-p Fo
morrow."
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