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March 02, 1918 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-02

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1

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~Iatlj

ASSOCIATEE
PRESS
DAY A NDNIGHT WI
SE'RVICE

Eb

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 1918.

PRICE THREE CE

IN ORiE
APRI1
T DECIDED'

ST ANNIVERSARY
P STATES ENTRY
INTO WAR

1 I

ATE OF INTEREST
IS STILL UNCERTAIN
blic Demonstrations of Patriotism
Strongly Urged for Opening
Day .
(By Associated Press)
Tashington, March 1.-On April 6,
first anniversary of the United
tes entry into the war, the third
arty Loan will open. There will be
ampaign of three of four weeks.
i announcing the date tonight,
retary McAdoo said the amount of
loan, the interest rate and other
ures, such as aonvertability of
ds of previous issues, maturity and
ns of payment, are yet to be de-
nined, and that new legislation
1 be necessary before plans ca.l
completed.
More Than $3,600,000,000
he fact that the amount of the loan
ppendent on further legislation in-
tes that it will be for more than
00,000,000, the remainder of the au-
rzed but unissued bonds, and the
that certificates of indebtedness
being sold in anticipation of the
i bear four and one-half per cent,
rds some indication of the interest
ow large the loan shall be de-
ris largely, however, on the fate of
pending war finance bill, carry-
and appropriation of a half a
on dollars, and action ~on the rail-
I bill with its appropriation of a
flar amount.
one More Loan Before June 30
lthough Mr. McAdoo made no
cific announcement, it is now tak-
for granted in official circles that
e will be but one more loan be=
June 30, the end of the fiscal.
hie statement concerning the date
he' campaign was made at this
, Secretary McAdoo explained, to
every community time to pre-
for the big bond sale, and he
ngly advocated popular demon-
tions of patriotism on the day of
opening of the loan and the sec-
year of war.
NDEN BURG NOT
IN BACH'S CLASS

ONLY 31 ORDNANCE
MEN HAVE ARRIVED
Thirty-one men were all that had
arrived up to late yesteiday afternoon
to start the ordnance course scheduled
to begin last Saturday. The remaining.
120 odd men are still stranded in sup-
ply depots receiving final examina-
tions and being outfitted.
It is the hope of Captain E. T. White
to get the course started Monday
,morning, but unless the absent men ar-
rive before that time it will not be
possible. A complete list of the men
enrolled in the course can not be com-
piled until the results of the examina-
tions arrive, as it is probableathat s v-
eral will fail. to pass and. have to be
dropped.
Physical requirements for ordnance
work are now on a par with those of
other services, as a result of a late
ruling of the Ordnance department.
Owls, Senior Society, Initiates
Owls, the oldest senior organization
on the campus, held a meeting last
evening at Hotel Catalpa. Dinner was
served at 6:30 o'clock and the follow-.
ing fledglings were initiated: J. H.
Broderick, '19E; R. M. Cleary, '20M;
H. H. Hefron, '20M; 3, D. Hibbard,
'18E; H. A. Gustin, '18; A. G. Ippel,
'18; M. H. Miars, '19D; S. G. Pratt,
'18E; C. R. Sabin, '18E; J. Schermer-
horn, Jr., '18; . H. Rough, '19E; A.
B. Thompson, and R. R. Winslow,
'19L.
FRESHMEN WIN CUP
A TW. A. A. BANQUET

Leave Siberia Policy to Japan
London, March 2.-According to the Daily Mail, it is understood
that the allies have decided to ask the Japanese to take any steps
necessary for the protection of the allies in the far east.
Washington, March l.-Indications now point to an agreement
between the entente powers and America to confide to Japan alone
the task of taking such measures as may be necessary to combat the
German aggression and influence in Siberia. No final conclusion has
been reached, however, and it was said in high official quarters to-
night that conditions were changing so rapidly, and so many new fac-
tors were entering into the problem that it would be unsafe to pre-
dict over night what the issue might be.

or Stanley Advises
to Retain German
Songs

Students

'if one cortege boy in 10 knows one
lege song, he's going some. Many
liege students are as unfamiliar
th real 'college songs as they are
th geography and good English."
is is the statement of Prof. Albert
Stanley of the School of Music, in
speech .on "Patriotic Music," given
the Twentieth Century club meet-
in Detroit, Thursday afternoon.
speaking of the songs the war has
)duced, Professor Stanley said:- "I,
nnot understand the flood of pa-
otic songs that have been brought'
'th during the last few months, and'
ve no enduring worth. They are fulll
a stupid, irresponsible appeal to
lower conceptions of life. There
s been too much of that the last 20
ars. Perhaps that explains it." I
Ele declared that the war should not.
ect the use of the compositions of
old German masters. "Bethoven
s an advocate of real democracy,"
said.
My Country, 'Tis of Thee," is a
bler song than "God Save the
ag," Professor Stanley contended,
nce the former was a song of my
intry, and not to a crowned head or'

Rousing songs celebrating the vir-
tues of the class of '21 and an uproar-
ious take-off on football won the
cup for the freshman girls at the
third annual banquet of the Women's
Athletic association last night. About
150 women were present. Clarissa.
Vyn, '18, president of the association,
was mistress of ceremonies and talks
on hockey, baseball, and basketball
were given by Phyllis Egglestone, '19,
Katherine Loveland, '20, and Beulah
Smith, '18.
Advantages of basketball over mil-
itary training as a preparation for
nursing were the subject of the skit
offered by the juniors; the sophomores
offered an imitation of company drill
of the R. O. T. C., and the seniors
showed women's military marching
"as the men think it is."
The cotillion of the department of
physical education followed the ban-
quet and the favor dances were dis-
tinguished from those of former years
by lack of expense. Several pretty
folk-dances added to the variety of
the program and an on-with-the-galosh-
es, thread-the-needle relay race
brought out vocferous cheering and
howls of laughter.
Ike Fisher's orchestra furnished
music.
UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS MAY
REMAIN CLOSED EVENINGS
That most of the University build-
ings would perhaps continue to be
kept closed for the rest of the semes-
ter, was the statement of Mr. E. C.
Pardon, acting superintendent of
buildings and grounds yesterday. This
would result in a considerable saving
in janitor service, and lighting and
heating expenses.
The main building of the University,
including University hail, Mason hall,
and the south wing are open eve-
nings from 7 to 9 o'clock, and all
evening classes are being held there.
Formerly these classes were held in
buildings all over the campus.
Instructors are permitted to use va-
rious buildings for work after 6
o'clock upon receipt of special per-
mission from President Harry B. Hut-
chins. Waterman and Barbour gym-
nasiums will continue to be kept
open, as during the cold weather spell.
MASQUES WILL 11D TRY-OUTS
NEXT WEEK FOR PINERO PLAY
Tryout for "Amazons," Pinero's
three-act play which is to be presented
by Masques, March 26, will be open to
all University women from 3:30 to 5
o'clock next Monday and Tuesday, in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. The play,
a satire on the "mannish woman," of-
fers six masculine and five feminine
parts which will be enacted by women.
The production will be under the di-
rection of Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, di-
rector of the club, and Beatrice Fales,

RAIDING FOE IRPLAQNES
BOMB UNWERSITY UION
PROFESSOR VIBBERT DESCRIBES
ATTACK ON PARIS HEAD-
QUARTERS
Michigan's branch of the American
University Union in France has had
its first taste of war. Prof. Charles B.
Vibbert, representing Michigan in the
Union, in writing to President Harry
B. Hutchins in a recent letter men-
tions this fact, though omitting the
details.
"We enjoyed (?) last night," Pro-
fessor Vibbert writes, "our first rea
German air raid, and it was as thrill-
ing and romantic as any accounts of
such events that I have ever read."
College Men Popular '
University men have been the cen-
ter of attraction in Paris since the
establishment of the Union. The
French people unceasingly beg to
have some of the college men intro-
duced into their homes. Concerning
this fact, Professor Vibbert writes:
"Shortly after our arrival in Paris
we began totbe showered with invita-
tions from some of the best families
to introduce some of our college men
into their homes. Not long afterwards
we were waited upon by a committee
representing some of the most prom-
inent families here in Paris, who wish-
ed to establish on a systematic scale
a system of hospitality for American'
military men, not only in Paris but i
the provinces as well. After a good
many changes of plans the "Society of
French Homes for American Men in
'Service" was organized under the
presidency of Henri Bergson, and with
Madame de Billy, the wife of the sec-
retary of the French High Commissiou
Washington, as secretary of the so-
ciety.
Amusement Furnished
"The society proposes to make it
possible for Americans to be received
informally at afternoon teas, at little
musicals, even in some cases at lunch-
eon or dinner. What this means, both
in providing a healthy and normal at-
mosphere for men while sojourning a
few days in Paris, and in bringing men
:into intimate touch with real, substan-
tial, and gifted French people, can
readily be understood."
Professor Vibbert mentioned a
'pleasant and unexpected meeting with
;a former teacher of his. "I have been
(much favored since my arrival. I met,
at a dinner at the Union tendered to a
group of prominent professors of the
Serbonne and the College' de France,
my old teacher, M. Bergson, who has
since shown me every evidence of hos-
pitality, even to inviting me to a din-
ner with a number of philosophers, a
'few weeks ago."
Professor Vibbert expressed pro-
'found thanks to President Hutchins
for the $5,000 that had been sent to
France to aid in the work of the Un-
ion. Hetalso complimented him on the
good work that had been done among
the Michigan students antd the Anu
Arbor townspeople, in the interest f
the American Unio.
MICHIGAN WOMEN N lEDEJ.
TO FILL PHIAR1ACY GAPE
:Lansing, March 1.-An urgent plea
for women to enter the pharmaceuti-
cal field to take the places of men now
in service was made by H. H. Hoff-
man, of the state board of pharmacy.

Pharmacy classes have been reduced1
60 per cent during the year, accord-
;re ., ,, r

KEALTH SERICE ILL
CONDUCT FOOD CAMPIGN
STUDENT HOUSES ASKED TO
SEND REPRESENTATIVES TO
AID IN WORK
Food consrvation in earnest will be
introduced on the campus next week
when the University Health service
asks the student body to sign pledges
to save every bit of foodstuffs it can.
Miss Sue C. Hamilton, sanitarian of
the Health service, has been canvass-
ing all the boarding houses and res-
taurants wh're students cat, in an ef-
fort to get them to save in every pos-
sible way. The boarding houses have
fallen in line readily, but it now re-
mains to get the students' support.
The hous aT can do comparatively
nothing unless the boarders agree to
help them conserve.
(.omnittee in Charge
A committee has been organized by
the health service to manage the con-
servation campaign. Representatives
have been chosen from the Union, the
Women's league, The Daily, and Ga-
len, medical society. Miss Hamilton
will act as chairman and representa-
tive of the. Health service, Arthur D.
Moore of the engineering faculty re-
presents the Union; Anna M. Lloyd,
'18, the Women's league; Charles R.
Osius, Jr., '20, The Daily, and Thomas
L. Tolan, '18M, the Galen society.
The first move of the committee will
be to ask fraternities, sororities,
league houses, and the dormitories to
elect Health service delegates who
wil carry on the campaign at their
houses. The concensus of opinion fa-
vors conservation, and many organi-
ations have expressed their wish to
co-operate with the committee in the
work. Campus societies have been
asked to assume responsibility for the'
distribution of pledge cards in their
respective colleges. Other means will
also be followed to get the cards'
among the students.
Move Is Patriotic,
Health service or sanitation dele-
gates from the different houses will
meet Thursday evening at. the Union
to discuss the plan of campaign. Each
house will be expected to have a rep-
resentative at the meeting, inasmuch ,
as this is a patriotic move.
The federal government has asked
that every precaution be taken to save
food for the scidiers. The state has re-
quested that every citizen do his share.
The county has conducted-a campaign
to get every housewife enrolled in the
food administration. Now the Univer-
sity will do its share of the saving.
This is one of the many smaller ways
in which students may show their pa-
triotism. The conservation commit-
tee at its meeting yesterday voiced the
opinion that the studens wilL not hesi-
tate to take up the matter, and the'
campaign is being conducted with]
that understanding. .
,'ERCILE FRANCAIS TO 1101)D
TRY-OUTS FOR PLAY TO1)AY
The first try-out for this year's
French play will be held at 10 o'clock,
this morning at the Cercle Francais
rooms. The Cerce's entertainment for,
this year, which will take place on
April 25th, will consist of two short,
plays, "Le Retour. Imprevu" by Reg-
nard and "L'Avocat Patelin." Try-outs
are not-lmited to members of the
'Cercle Francais, but are open to the

whole University. Everyone able to,
speak French or to act is urged to try
.r ,

SEND ULTIMATUM
TO RUSS LEADERS
(By the Associated Press)
March 1.-An ultimatum has been
handed to the Russian Bolshevik gcv-
'ernment by the German commander on
the eastern front, who has given the
'Russians three days in which to sign
the peace treaty demanded by the Teu-
tons. Coincident with this demand,
the German advance into Russia has
been resumed.:
That the situation in Petrograd has
become critical is reflected in the re-
port that the American and Japanese
ambassadors have reached Voljda,
the capital of the Russian provingc of
the same name, lying far to the east
of Petrograd. The British and French
embassies also have left the Russian
capital.
Reports forwarded by the way of
London say that the Russian troops
are destroying railroad property and
burning stores as they retire before
the Germans. At no point is there e-
rious fighting reported.
It was announced in a Berlin dis-
patch that Austrian troops have be-
gun to advance into Ukraine. This
movement it is stated is in response
to an appeal from Ukraine, probably
due to the operations of the Bolsheviki
there.
Among the terms of peace comm'ni-
cated to King Ferdinand of Roumania
by the central powers, was a demand
that he abdicate in favor of his broth-
er Prince William of Hohenzolleru
SOPHOMORE LITS POSTPONE
MIXER UNTIL AFTER VACATION
Sophomore literary students have
decided to postpone the mixer which
they had planned on holding in Bar-
bour gymnasium March 23 until aftei
spring vacation. The social committee
had reported that the only day the
gym could be secured was Saturday
afternoon, March 16, and because this
date interfered with the matinee of
the Union opera it was declared un-
satisfactory.
The social committee was author-
ized to confer with the social commit-
tee of the sophomore engineering class
for the purpose of deciding a date for
the prom.
A motion was made and carried to
the effect that a prom committee be
elected instead of the affair being left
in the hands of the social committee
.which the president appoints. . This
will be done if such action is consti-
tutional and the matter will be decid-
ed by the Student council at its regu-
lar meeting Sunday afternoon.
NAVAL AUXILIARY MEN TRAIN
FOR ENSIGNS' COMMISSION
The 20 men who have been called for
training from the Michigan unit of th
naval auxiliary reserve are now rated
as quartermasters, third class, and
will work for their ensigns' commis-
sions while in training. Through an
error, the statement was made in yes-
terdays -Daily that the men would'
work for quartermasters' warrants,
They are already rated in that rank.
Another detachment of men from
this unit will be called as soon as
.there is room on' the training ships
for them. All members of the unit'
will be given ,a two months' prelim-
inary training on merchant boats, and
will then be given two more months"
of work at other duties.
The Michigan unit will hold a smok-
er tonight at the Union. This is part'
of the better union campaign being
conducted by the club which the unit'
has organized.
PROFESSOR ALEXANDER ZIWET

TO ADDRESS RUSSI XRUZHOK
Professor Alexander Ziwet, of the
nathematics department, will be the
speaker at the regular bi-monthly;
meeting of Russki Kruzhok, the newly
organized Russian society, at 3:30
o'clock this afternoon in Barbour gym.
Professor Ziwet will tell of his ex-
periences as .a student in the. Uni-{
versities of Warsaw and Moscow, and:
other phases of Russian education will
be discussed by Prof. C. L. Mader'of
the general linguistics department.
Florence M. Price, '18 will real sev-
eral new translations from Russian
poetry, and there will also be a group
of musical numbers, the program to
be followed by election of officers.
It is the aim of Russki Kruzhok to
promote an interest in Russian in-
stitutions as well as in the literature,
science, and arts of that country. The'
meetings are open to all interested,

AWERICAN TRENCHES SHELL]
AND GASSED FOR HALF
AN HOUR
BARRAGE OVERTAKES
FLEEING PRUSSIAl?
Captain, 1917 West Point Gradna
Killed in Attack; Few Other
Casulties
(By the Associated Press)
'With the American army in Fran
March 1.-American troops repulse
strong German attack this morning
the salient north of Toul. There we
many American casualties, one of t
killed being a captain who was grad
ated from West Point in 1917.
The raid was a complete failu
three German prisoners remaining
American hands. The ground in frc
of the American trenches was stre'
with German dead.
Huns Fire on Americans
A driving wet snow was falling ti
morning when the Germans open
fire on the Americans with eve
weapon at their command. Seveni
sevens, heavy shells and gas she
fell in a perfect whirlwind on the A
erican trenches for half an hour.
the same time other enemy shells
great numbers were dropping on t]
American battery positions. So i
tense was the fire that the wood ba
of the salient was shot to pieces.
Germans Sweep Forward
At 6 o'clock the barrage fire lift'
on the trenches to the right of Ut
salient and Germans numbering 2
came sweeping forward under the pr
tection of their fre. They came fo
wardhapparently intending to make
big haul and j ump into what was le
of the trenches but there, instead
the easy time anticipated found tJ
Americans all ready for battle. Fer
ha nd-to-hand fighting began.
One American captain rallied mi
with rifles and machine guns a
went through the American wire e:
tanglements into o Man's land a
there waited for the enemy, whom i
expected to be driven out by his co
rades in the trenches.
He was right, for soon groups
the enemy started back through ti
wire entanglements. The America
poured in a deadly fire, but unforti
nately the captain was killed durn
the fighting,
Have Enough of American 'Ways
While the Americans were in fro:
of the wire entanglements and in she
holes still fighting desperately, ti
American barrage fire began sveepn
No lMan's land, catching many runi
ing Prussians who had enough of At
erican methods. The barrage fi
swept back and forth, making sure'
doing all possible damage to the fo
When the enemy had been drive
back out of the positions the bodiesa
10 German soldiers were found in th
American trenches. Two ('erm?
officers were entangled in the wire .
many bodies were in sight. Eight wei
visible through the snov strm at o
point.

The Germans have been propa :
for the raid for three weeks.
The Americans lost many killed ar
wounded, including officers. The Am
ericans displayed the greatest pe
sonal courage, b" every and energ
throughout the engagement, and ou
fought the 'surprised enemy from ih
instant contact was establishe.
COMMANDEER HOMES FOR USE
OF U. S. SHIPYARD WORKEJI
Washington, March 1.-Before pr
ceeding with construction of housin
for shipyard workers, the shippin
board it was announced tonight, wi
commandeer all available vaca:
hotels, apartment houses and resi
ences in cities near where ships a
being built. In this way it is expe&
ed to supply accomodations for thou
ands of workmen.
Compensation will be determined
the emergency fleet corporation's d

ak at Lenten Service
min Freidman of Niag-
Y., will speak at 6:45
ow evening at the meet-
wish Student congrega-
ble Chair house, corner
.Tefferson streets. His

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