100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIlCHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

,- ,

_ -
STETSON HATS

For Spring are Here
WE INVITE INSPECTION

i

--0

Wadhams & Co.

STATE STREET
ARCADE

MAIN STREET
AT WASHINGTON

in

THAT OLD SUIT
looks like a hopeless case banging

DISP ELEDBY GOVES
ORIDERIt PE RMITTNG AN N ARBOR
MILL TO START GWIINING
IS EXPECTED
A. D. Groves, food administrator for
Washtenaw county, assures Ann Arbor
people that there will be a decided re-
lief in the flour situation, as a result
of a meeting at Lansing, Wednesday.
Assurances of such a relief comes
from two sources. After an interview
with the officials at Toledo, Fred Heu-
,sel, one of the leading bakers in the
city, stated that within a week. he
felt confident'that the Ann Arbor City,
Milling company would be permitted
to fill local flour orders. The same mat-
ter was under consideration at Lans-
ing, and according to Mr. Groves, all
indications pointed to a favorable de-
cision.
Plenty of Sugar
"There need be no fear in regard to
the supply of sugar," said Mr. Groves.
Within a very short time, he indicated
that cane sugar would be moving all
over the country in large quantities.
He also stated that there were no
grounds for the alarm regarding a
shortage in canned goods.
The Ann Arbor City Milling com-
pany, according to Mr. G. Frank All-
pendinger, who is in charge of the
plant, hopes to be through with the
government orders by the early part
of next week. Bakers in this city
'base hope on the fact that the Iocal
mill has a large quantity of wheat in
the elevators.
The literary Critic Says
"IF I WERE TWENTY-ONE," by
William Maxwell.-J. P. Lippincott
Company, Philadelphia.,

the closet. Well, don't worry, let us
dry clean and press it for you-it is
good for lots of wear yet, and think of
the saving. Bring it in or let us call
today.

Merchants of

I-ANN ARBOR STEAM
--i f iJ DYE WORKS
PHONE 628

the city are experi-

CITY NEWS

&uune m con be yr C
. y.ur / a
' I .
If you want to insure your summer-
time comfort allow us' to become your
laundrymen. We will treat your
household linens or your personal
garments in a manner that will meet.
writh, your entire approbation. Ou'r

FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
if it's not right we make it right
- PHONE 273-

encing serious difficulties in estab-
lishing uniform hours for opening and
closing their places of business. Sev-
eral meetings have been held lateP
for the consideration of the matter,
and at. the meeting which will be held
this afternoo ui the credit asso-
ciation office, some agreement will
probably be reached.
The difficulties have been caused by
the fact that two times prevail in Ann
Arbor. Efforts are being made to in-
duce Congressman S. W. Beaks to use
his influence in the passage of the
daylight saving bill, which is now be-
fore Congress. This provides that the
time through the country will be ad-
vanced one hour. If nothing is done
through congressional legislation, the
people will have an opportunity to
regulate the time at the spring elec-
tions when the question will be bal-
loted.
The local draft board announces
there has been some misunderstand-
ing in regard to the meaning of cards
calling men for physical examinations,
and urges selected men even if they
are informed that they have passed
the examination, to remain in school,
or any other work they are follow-
ing.
Passing the physical examination
does not mean that a man will be call-
ed immediately, but merely that he
has been classified and is held in re-
serve. The board headquarters has
many visitors who ask induction into
the service because they are tired of
waiting for orders, being idle in the
meantime.
' The local board has one of the best
'records in making physical examina-
tions of any of the Michigan boards.
Only five per cent of the local quota
at Camp Custer has been returned be-
cause of physical disqualification.
Even a smaller per cent have been re-
turned from the men sent to other
camps. Preparations are being made
to send another quota of men to the
Spruce division of Vancouver for av-
iation service.
The national fuel administration's
edict calling for two "ightless" nights
every week has not been rescinded,
and the mayor is warning the people
not to violate the order until official
announcement is made. The "light-
less" nights were imposed on Michi-
gan Decembers14,andhave been rig-
idly obeyed since that time. Only
lights which are necessary for pub-
lic safety are permitted on Sundays
and Thursday evenings.
Alien slackers will be sent to the
farms and factories according to the
provisions of a bill which passed the
House Wednesday. This bill will in-
clude many aliens of Ann Arbor, who
have avoided the army because they
were aliens. Edwin Smith of the local
board said that although there were
538 aliens examined by the local board,
a very small percentage of them
claimed exemption because they were
aliens.
Hours of the Ann Arbor post office
have been changed in order to improve
service from the local office. Here-
after the post office will open at 7
o'clock in the morning, and will close
at 6:30 o'clock in the evening. The
change was made because very little1
mail was handled previously between
6 and 7 o'clock, and several people
have' urged that the post office open
earlier in the morning.'

r 10

Ckins
Drug'
Co.

FURNISHINGS
VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
Candies Make An Appropriate Gift
Let us supply you in boxes or bulk,
at reasonable prices.

Tailored to your
Individual Style

Suits and O'coats

WHITMAN'S
CANDIES

Sweaters
All wool Good dyes

Fountain of Youth

PLACE OF QUALITY

New Neckwear
is coming every day

200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor

117 Prl
Ypsilanti

prices please.
MOE
Phone 2355

LAUNDRY
204 No. Main St.

Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American IDishes

WAX RING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.

413 S.State St.

Phone 124-I-M

IF IT'S ANYTHING
PHOTOGRAPHIC, ASKI
SWAIN
113 East University
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
PENMANSHIP
Classes Just Starting. Enroll
'rTay
HAMiLTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William

Extension Lecturaes
Prof. Filibert Roth will lecture in
GrandRapids tonight on "The Forests'
of Michigan."
Dr. A. S. Warthin will lecture to-
night in St. Clair, Mich.
Prof. Clarence L. Meader will lec-
ture on "Changing Russia" tonight
in Lapeer.
Prof. T. J. C. Diekhoff will speak
in Detroit tomorrow night on "The
Life and Growth of Language."
President Flint, of Cornell, to Speak
President Charles W. Flint, of Cor-
nell college, Mount Vernon, Ia., will
deliver the second Wesleyan guiid 'ec-
lure on "Finding Ourselves," Sunday
evening at the Methodist church.
President Flint is a graduate of the
University of Toronto, and has re-
ceived advanced degrees from Colum-
bia university and the Drew Theolog-
ical seminary. This will be his first
appearance in Ann Arbor.

Many a man who has passed his 21st
mile post has spent hours wishing
he were back again with the knowl-
edge he has now of the business world.
William Maxwell is one of them. But
he is not content to sit by and wish-
his desire is to help today's 21st over
the rough places where he himself
stumbled, and for this purpose he has
.written his enthuiastic book, "If I
Were Twenty-OQne."
At firstwglance the critic might think
that Mr. Maxwell had written a very,
humorous account of certain laugh-
able experiences, and that its whole
merit lay in its spontaneity. But a
reading of the book reveals a veritable
gold mine of sound advice, and one
finds that the rich humor is but a
secondary consideration - a sugar
coating to make the swallowing eas-
ier.
Mr. Maxwell is a happy mingling of
the old fashioned and sff~ultra mod-
ern, and his ideas are often delightful-
ly startling. He fully believes in the
value of book-learning, but he says
that, were he to begin again, rather
than put his academic training to
immediate use, he would start out on
the road to sell, and he would not stop
until he could sell anything, any-
where. Then, with a philosophy of
life which would be his greatest as-
eset, he would look for a place where
he could put his book-learning to use.
He does not advocate the fixed pos-
ition or the salaried job, believein%
that they tend to subdue the spirit,
and regretting that he clipped his
wings in that way. He laments the
modernrtendency to over-specializa-
tion, for, although he .does not under-;
estimate the value of cultivating one's!
ability along one line, he lays great
stress onthe importancepofskeeping
one's finger ever on the pulse of the'
world at large.
Although intended for the fledgling,
William Maxwell's adventures will'
find a place in the hearts of even the'
oldest and most experienced of bus-
iness men.
Gasoline 23c, Polarine S6c. Staebler
A Co., 117 . Ashley St.-Adv.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.
Buy your alarm clocks at J. L
Chapman's. Jew&,r. .11 S. Main."

Scores of lovely long rolled collars
of gleaming white satin.
All manner of interesting Georgette
crepe collars-
And crisp organdie ones, which are
always fresh and dainty, are well
represented, too.

50c to $2.50

Also new jabots and jabot-collars of
filet lace, at

MAIN AND LIBERTY STS.

'
,.

U

ganization. Gustave Sodt is captain,
Charles Snyder, first lieutenant and
Leslie Feiner, second lieutenant. The
organization extends throughout the
state to provide state protection, and
take the place of the national guard
which is in federal service.
TWO COLLECTIONS
GIVEN TO MUSEUM

FOR RENTI
FOR RENT-Unfurnished apartment
at 1124 Hill. Six nice large rooms1
and bath, soft water. Steam heat
and water furnished. Modern in
every respect. Possession will be
given immediately or April 1st. Call
164-M.
FOR RENT - Front suite and one
single room. Modern conveniences.
Reasonable. 411 E. Williams St.
Two blocks from campus.
FOR RENT - Light house keepiig
rooms. Gas for cooking furnished.
Phony 1199-R, 50? E. Liberty St.
- WAJTID
WANTED-To buy men's second hand
clothing. Will pay good price for
clothes in fair condition. Call Brown
at 210 Ef. Hoover Ave. Phone 2601.
WANTED - Two Pre-Festival cover
coupons. Phone 2317-R between
7:30 and 9:30 A. M.
WANTED-Two Pre-Festival coupon
covers. Call 1878-M mornings.

WANTED
WANTED-Lady student for salaried
position during summer vacation to
give demonstration instruction in
conservation. Phone 1856-M, be-
tween 12 and 2 and 5 and 6 P. M.
WANTED-Three live University men
to work during spring vacation. Ap-
ply Box A, Daily.
LOST
LOST-Log-log Slide Rule in Eng.
Building. Name, J. McFarlen print-
ed on same. Finder please call
815-J. Reward.

The common council will meet this
afternoon in a special session to act
as a board of review on sewer asess-
ments. The first regular monthly
meeting will be held Monday evening.
Three local junk dealers were dis-
covered in the possession of 100 feet
of copper wire which is alleged to
have been stolen from the electric
company's yards. The case wills be
heard before Judge Doty, March 14.
A cempany of 60 young men has
volunteered its services to the state
of Michigan, by enlisting in the local
organization of the Home guards,
completed at a meeting Wednesday
evening in the Armory. Previous to
that ~meeting 34 had joined the or-

Two collections of fossils, including
about 6,000 specimens, have been ad-
ded to the Geological museum. The
larger one consisting of over 4,000
specimens, was donated by H. H.
Hindshaw, of Alpena, who spent 17
years in collecting them. It is the
most complete collection of fossils, of
the Divonain age, which exists. Some
of the specimens are duplicated and
duplicates will be given to high
schools of the state.
The other collection was owned by
the Old Natural History society, of
Detroit. It was deposited with the
University through the efforts of Bry-
ant Walker, '79L. It was on exhibi-
tion at the Art Museum in Detroit
until the place became too crowded,
when it was stored in the basement
and left there until last fall. The
collection is extremely valuable, as it
contains many specimens from iocali-
ties where the supply is now exhaust-
ed or inaccessible.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. .L Chapian's
is the 'place. 113 5., MaIu.-Adv..
Patronise Our Adrertisers.-Adv.

Class
Hot Rolls - 2 for is
MICHIGAN INN
PhoEza 948-R 601 E. Liberty
STO P AT
I'U T T LES
For LuncheI and Soda-

LOST-Pair tortoise-shell
Finder call 1842-J, or
Quarry's Drug Co.

spectacles.
leave at

LOST-A slide rule somewhere on the
campus. Finder please call 1741-W.
' Reward.
LOST-K and E slide rule at assem-
bly. Finder call 1739-W, L. W. Page.
FOR SALZ
FOR SALE--Two Pre-Festival stubs.
Call 2096.

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS. 116s. Main St.

1'- TYPEWRITERS
r For Sale and Rent
TYPEWRITING
Mlimeographing ,
Fraternity and Social Stationery
0. D. OaRRILL
X22 South State Street

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan