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February 26, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1f IILnUI I U UnIUL
CRPLDSOLDIERS

r.

S w

"RECONSTRUCTION HOSPITALS"I
BUILT FOR WOUNDED
FIGHTERS
Chicago, Feb. 25.- Plans for the
"reconstruction" of soldiers who may
be maimed in European trenches are
now so far advanced that already
America is prepared to care for her
crippled fighters as rapidly as they
may arrive here, according to Major
W. A. Shields, in charge of the medical
supply depot supplying the central
army division. At hospitals, which
are to be erected in every large city
in the United States, the wounded
soldiers will receive not only the best
medical attention, but also .will be
taught trades and professions which
they, may practice in spite of their
changed physical condition.
"Reconstruction hospitals" are so-
called because they are to be places
where soldiers will be literally "re-
built," according to Major Shields.
They will be cared for. throughout
long periods of convalescence, the more
serious wounds will be treated, arti-
ficial limbs will be supplied, and pa-
tients taught the proper use of them.
But the work of reconstruction will
not be only physical, according to
Major Shields.
The soldiers will be made over
mentally as well. The deaf, 'dumb,
and blind will be taught to do work
at which they may earn a livelihood
in spite of their defects.
WHEAT SITUATION
IMPROVES IN CITY

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
4 o'clock-Botanical Journal club
meets in room 173, Natural Science
building.
4:15 o'clock-Prof. I. -L. Sharfman
speaks in harbour gymnasium on "The
World Today, Economically."
8 o'clock-Cercle Francais meets at
1850 Washtenaw avenue.
8 o'clock-Mr. Poultney Bigelow
speaks in Hill auditorium on "Prus-
sian Memories."
12:35 o'clock-Lenten services at
444 South State street.
TOMORROW
12:35 o'clock-Lenten services at
444 South State street.
5 o'clock-Dante society meets in
room 301, University hall.
7:30 o'clock-Prof. C. H. Van Tyne
speaks in School of Music auditorium
on "The Causes and Issues of the
,War."
U-NOTICES
All men desiring to try out for as-
sistant baseball manager must call
Jasper B. Reid, phone 188, before 5:30
o'clock this afternoon.
Course 10b, economic botany, will
meet at 7 o'clock tonight in room 401,
south wing of Unversity hall.
The entire female chorus of "Let's
Go!" will rehearse at 4 o'clock this
afternoon at the Union.
The entire cast of "Let's Go!" will
rehearse at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the
Nickels arcade hall.
Night classes in engineering English
hereafter meet in the following rooms
in the south wing of U-hall:
English 2 room 102, English 3 room
302, English 4 room 302, English 21
room 100, English 28 room 304.

INTO POTATOSIUATI
THOUSANDS OF BUSHELS ROT
MICHIGAN DESPITE WAR
TIME PRICES

c

IN1

I

Detroit, Mich., Feb. 25.-The potato
problem in Michigan this winter is at-
tracting widespread attention. Pri-
vate investigations have been start-
ed to determine why thousands upon
thousands of bushels of tubers have
been allowed to rot in country dis-
tricts, while war prices have been
maintained in Detroit and other Mich-
igan cities.
Information obtained from various
sections of the state indicates that
potatoes which have sold for 45 and
50 cents a peck in Detroit are a drug
on the market in sections less than
200 miles from here. Farmers have
tried to get $1 a bushel for their pro-
duct, and failed. Recently they have
been offered about 90 cents.
Last spring when potatoes were
selling for sky high prices, a tremend-
ous campaign was- prosecuted all over
Michigan for a record yield. Seed
potatoes sold as high as $3 a bushel
and farmers have claimed there was a
tacit understanding that they would
receive $1 a bushel for their pro-
duct.
Vacant lots were planted all over
the state. Hundred' of families raised
their own potatoes and the result was
that millions of bushels of "spuds"
were dug from Michigan soil last fall.
The average crop was 102 bushels an
acre against 45 bushels an acre in 1916.
Reports to the secretary of state. es-
timate that more than forty million
bushels 'of potatoes was Michigan's
yield.

not only
in the p
dom yet
ness of I

I

I
p

I,

V G

TYLES IN
IRTINGS

dras, Silks, Silk
s and Colorings
SOLICITED

The Ann Arbor Milling company dis-
PEOPLE PREFER tributed almost 200 barrels of flour to
local dealers yesterday and the flour
situation is now in better condition.'
The Quality and Greek bakeries, how-"
ever, are still closed.
Two baking firms, the Modder and'
White bakeries received small ship-
ments of flour in the nick of time. With '
the present supply, they will be able
to continue their business for at least
lone week.
E A MOn the whole, the situation is very
/ much improved, and Mr. G. Frank All-
mendinger, who is in charge of the
Pasteurzcd Crea m Ann Arbor Milling company, said to-
daythat people will not go hungry.'
In a very short time, he will have large
quantities of corn and barley flour to
sell. The mill worked late last night
Recieved in order that a sufficient amount of
substitutes might be turned out for the
dealers.
Cical avigatio"People"in Ann Arbor have accumu-
lated prodigious supplies of flour in
Bowditch their- homes to prepare for a possible
shortage. One woman is known to
have enough flour to last five months
in & C o . and another to have five barrels in her
possession. People, however, are un-
Detroit able to secure sufficient bread for
their needs. One dealer states that he
was forced to turn 200 people away
Quest of Love," a-Scotch verse by Ce- Saturday ,night after many of them
)ER cil Ross, '18. had visited almost every bakery in the
The Inlander will be on sale to- ' city.
iary morrow. A prominent business man is re-
ported to have taken up this matter
WILSON FIXES PRICE OF with the authorities at Toledo. Should
NEW WHEAT CROP AT $2.30 the government grant the Ann'Arbor
orth Milling company permission to grind
that Washington, Feb. 25.-A price of the thousands of bushels of -wheat now
uted $2.20 a bushel-the same as for last lying in the elevators, Ann Arbor ba-
se- year's crop-was fixed by President era claimthat they would be well fixed
with Wilson. tonight for the coming sea- for mouths to come.
cca- son's wheat yield. The price is for
Mr. No. 1 northern spring wheat at Chi- TWO STUDENTS TAKE ROLE OF
lat- cago, with a sale of differentials for
his other markets.
give In fixing a price now for the new Leslie Duchalz, fleeing from the po-,
har- crop which will not be harvested until li, took the principal role in a
who June the President was believed to thrilling but side-splitting comedy on
it. have had two objects in view. The the banks of the Huron above the
Bab- first was to hold legislation pending boat house on Sunday afternoon. W.,
rhite in congress, to fix prices at from $2.25 P. Fortune, '20, Varsity football man,
rItto $3 and the other. was to stimuate an&' Lawrence W. Hayes, '20M, after
to $prn an tig other wawatching Duchalz rush to the water's
tra spring planting. Iedge and prepare to disrobe if the
aul- officer aproached, succeeded in grab-
h 0' Prof. Ndams to Entertain French Club bing the alleged culprit by the collar.
man Prof. E. L. Adams of the French de- After a short struggle, the offender
rner partment will entertain the Cercle was handed over to Officers Sodt and
fting Francais at his home, 1850 Washten- Hardin, to the enjoyment of the
aw avenue, at 8 o'clock tonight. spectators.
e an There will be especially invitedI
arry, guests besides the members of the VICTORIA ADAMS, '19, ENTERS
'The French club. U. S. SERVICE IN NEW YORK

*

* * JHEAVY THAW FINDS LO(

*
*
*
*
*,
*

AT THE THEATERS

*
*

DRAINAGE SP

John Drew and .Margaret Ill-'
ington in "The Gay Lord Quex"
at the Garrick.

*
*
*

(Continued from Page
Grounds E..C. Pardon laid t
for this on the' fact that bu
takes were provided for 80
land.
Some water flowed into th
ward of University hospital,
was easily baled out. The c
many places resembled a

PH

* "Love O'I
* ney, Saturda

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Mike" at the Whit- *
y, March 2. *
*
TODAY *

Majestic-Carlyle Blackwell
"A Square Deal."

in *

Wuerth--Texas Guinan in
Gun Woman." Also Triangle
edy, "A Butler Bust Up."

"TI
coi

Arcade - Robert Warwick in
"The Silent Master." Also Pathe
news.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

AT THE. ARCADE

--in-
"A SQUARE DEAL"
WED., FEB. 27
.HARRY MOREY
- in-
"HIS OWN PEOPLE"
THURS., FEB. 28

Robert Warwick, who is now a cap-
tain "somewhere in France," will ap-
pear at the Arcade today and tomor-
row in "The Silent Master." Mr.
Warwick appeared successfully in
"The Argyle Case," and his new play
is a worthy successor to that feature.
This play is taken from Phillips Op-
penheim's popular novel, "The Court
Hof St. Simon."- It has to do with a
man of wealth in Paris who, in league
with the Apaches, holds a 'mysterious
court of St. Simon, in which wrong-
doers who can be reached by the other
processes of the law, are punished.
Olive Tell and Anna Little play im-
portant roles.

"WHEN MEN ARE TI
-With -
-[ARY ANDERSON
AL WHITAI

11

WS - 3, 7, 8:30 -S
(Eastern Time)
es Iec-2c Tax-15e

PROF. SHEPARD EXPLAINS
USAGE OF CAMP TESTS

"Psychological Tests in the Army"
vas the subject of an address by
Prof. J. F. Shepard, of the psychology
department, Sunday night at the meet-
ing of the Unitarian Students' society.
Professor Shepard explained the
tests which are now being used in foifr
training camps, and which will be
used everywhere in the next draft to
determine the exact position in which
each drafted man should be placed.
He illustrated his talk with several
questionnaires, and stated that a great
deal of trouble would be saved by im-
mediately classifying the men accord-
ing to their abilities.
Following the address, arrainge-
gments were made for an informal
dance to be held at 8 o'clock next
Saturday evening in the 'Guild rooms.
Germans Refuse to Attack Russians
Petrograd, Sunday, Feb. 24.-A re-
port that 20,000 German soldiers re-
fused to attack the Russians in the
new campaign was given out today by
the Bolshevik telegraph agency. Pol-
ish troops in some instances are said
to have fled.

WHIT

SATLJ
Miss E
THE

+CELIEBRA
-BY~i

ki 7

'HICALLY

for photographers.
t man should know
when Uncle Sam is
t means that if you
later on.
ntry by learning all

Victoria Adams, '19, will leave Ann
Arbor within the next week to enter
the cablegram censorship office in
New York city.
Miss Adams is the first undergrad-
uate woman of the University to give'
up her University course to enter the
war service. According to reports
Miss Adams is also the first under-
graduate woman to go out from the
middle west -universities and enter

11

AND

government service.
Thra aaav

adverl

are first choice

~ :' t

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