100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 24, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ian

a

4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1918.

PROMISED
OUR GRISIS
onises Ann Arbor Mill-
y to Distribute Sup.
This Week

ALLIA1NCE WORKED
AGAINST 1WISON
Toledo Lawyer Pictures Propaganda
Operations of Gernan-Amneri-
can Alliance

1.

ig Con

as his ?NEARLY 200 BARRELS WILL BILL WILL REVOKE
of the BE AVAILABLE; MORE COMING CHARTER OF PARTY

il be given at regular
eek or 10 days, and,
.nected, will refer to
I subject. The object
is to acquaint st~u-
with the real truths
1 situation, past and
:s return home next
r, they will be expect-
facts of the present
of. Ralph W. Aigler,
committee in charge
yesterday. "And it
that one should look
n for information on
. situation. By at-
res, students may ac-
es with conditions
eking a regular course

Hoover Declares Country Must Make
Further Sacrifices or War
Will Be Lost
Temporary relief for the flour and
wheat shortage is now in sight.
The Ann Arbor City Milling com-
pany received word from government
authorities yesterday allowing themi
to distribute their flour and wheat
throughout the city some time next
week.
Four Bakeries Now Closed
At present four baking firms are
closed and another under the manage-
ment of John Illi, is being supplied by
the Fred Heusel bakery. The White
bakery which was the last to close,'
had borrowed flour from another firm
to resume business yesterday. The

Opposed Two Candidates in
Elections Because of "Un--
neutrality"

1916

DEFEATS
18 TO 14

'Washington, Feb. 23.-The National
German-American Alliance was pic-
tured before a senate judiciary sub-
committee today by Gustavus Ohlin-
ger, a Toledo, Ohio, lawyer, as a cov-
er for German propaganda in the
United States. Mr. Ohlinger was the
first witness at hearings on the bill by
Senator King of Utah to revoke the
charter of the Alliance and wind up
its affairs and those of its state or-
ganizations.
Used Propaganda
Mr. Ohlinger said the operation of
the organization in the United States
is similar to the propaganda system by
which Germany brought Austria un-
der its complete dominance. He de-
clared that much of his testimony was
based on information taken from lit-
erature sent to members.
Preceding the national political con-
vention in 1916, the witness said, the
Alliance worked against the renomi-
nation of President 'Wilson and urged
its members to aid in bringing about
the defeat of Theodore Roosevelt for
the Republican nomination both on
the theory that neither favored a
"strict neutrality" and that both were
opposed to German interests in this
country.
WOMEN ON REVISED
OPERA COMMITTEES

PENNELL DRAWINGS
SHOWN THIS WEEK
Judging by attendance, members of
the faculty and students do not seem
to be aware of the fact that the fa-
mous collection of Pennell drawings
which have arisen so much interest all
over the country, and to which crowds
have flocked in every city in which
they have been exhibited, are now at
Memorial hall. They are not onlyof
interest from the point of art, but
from the point of view of the war. Mr.
Pennell has traveled about this coun- I
try and England and has sketched
the scenes and activities that appealed
to his artistic sense and imagination.
In addition to these drawings there -
are 20 exquisite scenes by Albert Sea-
ford, original drawings of his books.
"Boston-Its Byways and Highways,"
"Old Seaport Towns of New Eng-
land," "Rambles in Old College Towns,
and others." According to those who
have seen them, they are the most
c
beautiful and striking drawings everd
exhibited in Ann Arbor. Mr. Seaport
is not so well known here as in Bos-
ton and New England, where he made
c
a reputation for himself as sketch
artist on the Boston Globe. His draw-
ings have been displayed in Toledo, t
Buffalo, Boston, and other large cit-
ies, and have always received enthu-
siastic mention. This exhibition will
be open from 2 to 4 o'clock during the
present week. The exhibition is free
to all members of the Art Association,
and 10 cents to others.

Head

At

London, Fe
ess goverum
here tonight
renew the peg
conclude peat
ditiops:
"Both to de
"All region
cated at Bres

I

ch., Feb. 23.-A dispatch
it Free Press reads as
rthwestern university in
game added another to
victories tonight, defeat-
18 to 14. Captain Un-
e Purple team, was put
me in the early part for
S.
yed the best game for
king two baslets and
>rthwestern from scoring
y his defensive work.

OF ITALYf

others are the Modder bakery, the
Quality bakery, and the Greek bakery.
Mr. G. Frank Allmendinger, secre-
tary and treasurer of the Ann Arbor
City Milling company, said that after
the government orders for export are
filled, he will have about 100 or 200
barrels of flour for local distribution.
This, together with small amounts
that are being procured from the Sa-
line Milling company, will relieve the
shortage until large shipments now
on the way, arrive.
Other Mills Affected
Another milling company in this
vicinity has been ordered to close, ac-
cording to definite reports received
today, due to the fact that they- have
already consumed the amount allow-
ed them. Other mills are being or-
dered to discontinue operation fpr the
same reason. -
As a war necessity the people must
largely refrain from eating wheat
flour for the next 60 days, at least,
This statement was made yesterday on
the authority of Federal Food Admin-
istrator Hoover, by Howard Heinz,
administrator for Pennsylvania. Mr.
Hoover made it plain that this country
must immediately send food to the
Allies or lose the war.
Transportation Problem Settled
In a-letter to Mr. Hoover, Director-
General McAdoo said: "I wish to re-
assure the country that as far as
transportation is concerned there is
no danger of suffering from a serious
food shortage."
At present two large shipments are
on the way for local dealers; one of
350 barrels and the other for 300 bar-
rels.
"The latest measure restricting the
wheat flour has been adopted," said
Administrator Hoover, "because it is
the only way by which necessary
wheat saving can be effected. With-
out the help of all the people the food-
cannot be sent .o the Allies. If it is
not sent, it means but one thing -
catastrophe."

1 1HBM FOR FREEING GERMJ
EXPLOSIVE FOUND BY AUTHOI
IES AT FORT DOUGLAS
PRISON CAMP

to
of

Snow
one inter
ith these

Dr.

I I

I -__.

s of fighting above the clouds,
conditions in the front line
s on the Italian front, and ac-
photographs of peculiar and in-
g phrases of the war, will be
ed and illustrated by Dr.
Upson Clark at 8 o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium.
Clark, formerly professor of
.t Yale university, is now di-
f the American school of class-
Adies at Rome, which is a part
American academy there, and is
cial representative of the Ital-
ernment.
notion pictures and series of
rere loaned by the Italian gov-
t and have never been shown
country. President Harry B.
s and Lieut. George C. Mul-
e all the cadets and stu-
attend the lecture.
g to a budget provided by the
ity, the lecture will be given
charge of admission.
IN ANNOUNCES HOURS
FOR OPERA REHEARSALS
t. John, director of."Let's Go!"
ounced the rehearsal hours for
part of this week as follows:
Eck Monday afternoon, Union,
eemale chorus; 7:30 o'clock
night, Union, entire east and
4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon,
entire female chorus; 7,,30
Tuesday night, Nickels arcade
tire cast; 4 o'clock Wednesday
>n, Union, entire female chor-
30 o'clock Wednesday night,

Revised committee lists for "Let's
Go!" were announced yesterday by
the Union. A number of former com-
mitteemen have left school, thus ne-
cessitating many changes in the per-
sonnel of the committees. The com-
plete list follows:
General chairman, Alan Livingston,
'18E; assistants to general chairman:
Donald M. Springer, '19E, F. Cortez
Bell, '19, Hugo E. Braun, '19L, and
Frieda McLellan, '18; stage commit-
tee: Chairman, A. Gerald Gabriel, '18,
Ralph E. Gault, '19, W. W. Hinshaw,
'20, and W. P. Favorite, '20; electrical
committee: Chairman, Harold W. Col-
lins, '18E, and Paul Smith, '19; cos-
tume committee: Chairman, Arthur G.
Ippel, '18, C. M. Norton, '19E, Charles
Sullivan, '19E, S. C. Zylstra, '19E, Ruth
Connely, '18, Harriet Briggs, '18, Ruth
MacLachlan, '18, and Mildred Sutton,
School of Music.
Properties committee: Chairman,
W. S. Dinwiddie, '18E, John Chase,
'19, A. L. Martinek, '19E, and J. H.'
Broderick, '19; music committee:
Chairman, S. W. Sedgwick, '19, George
Mason, '21, Carl E. Johnson, '20, and
H. T. Fletcher, '20; publicity commit-
tee: chairman, C. C. Andrews, '18,
Mark K. Ehlbert, '20, and C. M. Camp-
bell, '20; program committee: Chair-
man, A. E. Horne Jr., '18, E. T. Ed-
wards, '20, J. E. Goodwillie, '20, C. A.
Newcomb, '19, James Pottinger, '20,
and P. E. Cholette, '20L.
I A group picture of the committees
will be taken at 12 o'clock noon Mon-
day at White's studio, and all those
whose names appear in the preced-
ing list are asked to be present
promptly at that time.
Margaret Foote Is Married at Alma
Margaret Foote, '15, was married
February 21 to Louis A. Stearns, pro-
fessor of biology at Alma college, at
the home of President Crooks' of Al-
ma. Miss Foote is a member of Kappa
Alpha Theta sorority and Stearns is
a memher of Signia Phi.

Salt Lake City, Utah, Feb. 23.--A state
high explosive bomb, believed by au- must
thorities to have been intended for use ian ti
in the wholesale delivery of German
war prisoners was found at the Fort
Douglas prison camp late today. Wi
The bomb was found in -a section marc
of the camp housing German civilian unop
war prisoners and where- numerous push
attempts have been made to effect es- senti
cape by the digging of tunnels. with
giver
ALL-CAMPUS SING Russ
TODAY AT UNION
Gu
as th
Michigan's first All-campus sing will defer
be held from 3 to 5 o'clock this after- coun
noon at the Union. The program will a stif
consist of the singing of Michigan temp
songs and patriotic airs. Joseph Pal- Me
ma, '20M, will lead the singers. Petro
Through the courtesy of the Grin- mood
nell Music company, the Union has are :
been supplied with 200 copies of a their
book containing old songs. peopl
It is the plan of the Union to alter- emy.
nate the All-campus sings with the
regular Sunday afternoon mixers. Aln
Russ:
DRA-FT COST MICHIGAN $GM - move
PER-3IAN; BELOW AVERAGE miles
-- thef
Lansing, Feb. 23.-Michigan falls Germ
nearly 10 per cent below the average the.]
for the United States in credits against Minsh
its draft quotarfor men enlisted in the they
United States service. The figure for miles
Michligan is 30.88 per cent. The aver- tinuin
age for the United States is 40.42 per
cent, according to first reports of the In
provost marshal general to the sec- begun
retary of war. to- ha
The national total to be raised was ation
1,152,985 including 687,000 in the first porte
draft, 465,985 in the National Guard along
June 30, 1917. and the men who enter- Plata
ed the regular army between April 2 appai
and June 30, 1917. Michigan's gross which
quota for the first draft was 43,936, tion a
enlisted credits 13,569, leaving a no Mi
quota to be raised of, 30,291. . been
The cost per man selected for ser-
vice in the National Army in Michi- * *
gan was $6.34, The average for the *
United States was $4.93. Oklahoma * 0
showed the lowest cost per man with * vita
$1.57 and Rhode Island the highest of * on
$18.02. * day,
Comparison with' the cost of the * o'cl
draft in the Civil War is favorable to * inv:
the present administration. Prior to * cen
March 3, 1863 the cost was $34.01 per * men

DEAN COOLEY TO ADDRESS
EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Mortimer E. Cooley, dean of the col-I
lege of engineering, left Ann Arbor
yesterday morning for Atlantic City
to attend a meeting of the department
of superintendence of the National
Educational Association. Dean Cooley,
will deliver a message of President
Wilson to the effect that students now
in college should remain and complete
their education before going to the
front.
While in the east, Dean Cooley will
visit a number of other cities in an
unofficial capacity, returning to Ann
Arbor about March 1.

, DENT.,
[ ANN ARBOR

City, a

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
. Huron and Division

'

10:30 A. M. (Eastern Time)
THEME: "THE REALITY OF GOD"
Second in series of Lenten Services
QTThPKTTQ TAT I7TTmn

- man and after
act became $9
out that this -
as $10 would p

rison is u
e service in

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan