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February 23, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MiCHIQAN DAILY Su riuA,

usively entitled
fall news dis-
herwise credit-
he ,local news
University of
orning except
year.
Arn Arbor as
ding.
ial, 2414.
ed Soo words
s will be pub-
cretion of the
he Ann Arbor
ox in the west
y, where the
o'clock each

.. McDonald......Managing Editor
Emery.........Business Manager
rth Robinson..Acting Business.Mgr.
tor ................C. S. Clark Jr.
or ...... ......Herbert G. Wilson
ditr ...James Schermerhorn, Jr.
Editor..........Bruce A. Swaney
Editor........Mildred C. Mighell
Editor .........Margaret H. Cooley
d inson......Advertising Manager
Cholette......Publlication Manager
Woi. . {.....irulation Manager
. Smith...........Credit Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
Barnes - C. M. Campbell
ius, r. W. R Atlas
I.. Roeser Mark K. Ehlbert
REPORTERS
Apine Paul A. Shinkman
.din Horace 4. Hunter
v. Fox Rilla A. Nelson
S. 'Patterson Philip Slorovitz
shi Frances Broene
>rden Ida E. Mines
M. Price Samuel Lamport
wn .Edgar L. Rice
Sergeant David B. Landis
K. Frances Haudibo
BUSINESS STAFF
Leitzinger Harry D. Hause
Zress L. A. Storrr
ttle Katherine Kilpatrick
riteh Agnes Abele
miedeskamtp Frances . Macdonald
. Cadwell, Jr. Francis II. Case
DAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1918,
, Editor- "[ark K. Eh lbert
CITY WATER
are few things more import
he wei are of its citizens than
rater system. Most cities rec-
the fact and take especial
s to provide for a pure water
at all times.
city the size of Ann Arbor it
ass than a crime to have the
n such condition as it is at
Sent. We do not need a physic-
alysis to tell us that the water
to drink, that it may breed
However, the health service
:rted that it is impure.
is the city doing to improve
ation? What steps has it tak-
'event its citizens from becom-
ject to disease? It would seem
mmon pride, if not regard for
bitants' health, should suggest
ove.
not buy the filters that have
Iked about for so long? Why
ange the source of supply
present source is' unsanitary?
>t ,appropriate suchhfunds as
wessary? There has been
talk. The question is vital and
s immediate attention. Do
nug.
IE 1919 OPERA BOOK
ose who aspire to write the
r the 1919 Union opera, an ex-
1I opportunity is being offered.
t St. John, director of "Let's
nd an experience theatrical
as volunteered to assist the
playwrights in the writing of
naro and book.
highly desirable that a stu-
the author of the 1919 opera
[f an alumnus should have to
ad upon again to perform a
duty, as was the case this year,
ting of opera books by alumni
become an institution-a con-
rhich is dreaded by the Union
as by the campus.
elieve that there is enough
o the campus to produce a
r next year's opera. Now is
e for production.
have a student write the 1919
ook!
rs tell us that man is heir
r diseases. Several represent-
f the genus homo who are now
eontagious hospital are enjoy-
easly inheritance.

the proper name for the Grand Rapids
production.
The water remains muddy but then
May 1 is still a long way off.
0 S. MOST ITIM TELY
PROF. ANDREW McLAUGHLIN EX-
PLAINS CONNECTIONS OF
TWO NATIONS
"Great Britian' is the nation with
which we have the most intimate phy-
sical relation, and our interests are
strong when theirs are supported,"
stated Prof. Andrew C. McLaughlin of
the University of Chicago, in a lecture
delivered yesterday afternoon in Hill
auditorium.
"If an conflict arises between Great
Britain and the United States it will
be due to the obeying of a selfish in-
stinct of one of these nations. If we
do not quarrel with, Great Britain,
it will mean that the old feudal prob-
lems have been abandoned for better
and more civilized methods."
Cadets of the R. 0. T. C., and mem-
bers of the Law and Medical schools
attended in a body. Professor Mc-
Laughlin is head of the history de-
partment at the University of Chi-
cago and a f rmer member of the his-
tory faculty of the University of Mich-
igan.
Traced History of England
The speaker, after giving a few
texts, traced the history of England
and the United States from the sev-
enteenth century. "At that time,
Prussia was no bigger than a man's
hand on the horizon," Professor Mc-
Laughlin stated. "In order to un-
derstand the principles for which the
whole civilized world is fighting, it is
necessary to review the circumstances
which lead up to the present war."
Britain had a corrupt political sys-
tem, but showed signs of improvement
during the seventeenth centry, accord-
ing to the speaker. He pointed out
that the revolution in America was a
shock to the British, but the "fortress-
es of feudalism showed signs of weak-
ening." '
Britain's Chief Jewel
"The American revolution is one
of the chief jewels in the imperial
diadem of Great Britain," said the lec-
turer. "In the decades of the nine-
teenth century, one fact showed itself
to the world and to Great Britain,
namely, America was actually making
a success of democracy. Bismarck
stamped democracy out of Prussia 60
years ago. "
In tracing the history of the last
century, the speaker pointed out that
it was an open struggle between the
old forces of Britain and new liberal-
ism, or the seeds of democracy. Little
by little democracy gained a foot-
hold, and in 1910 England frankly
stood forth to protect the popular in-
stitutions and other high ideals of
humanity.
"There is as strong a democratic
feeling in England as in the Unite'
States at the present time, despite
the factthat some positionsmare given
to persons of high birth," Professor
McLaughlin stated. "The British are
allowed to shape their own destinies.
U. S. Had Touch of Despotsm
"The United Stats had a slight touch
of despotism when it took over the
states of Texas, California, and the
territory bordering Mexico, and when
it introduced the Monroe doctrine.
It was also blackened by slavery I

"Slavery can be found everywhere .
Slavery is a weed that grows in every
soil. Germany is still cherishing brut-
al compulsion and conquest. Ger-
many and her allies must be totally
crushed or allowed to show the sup-
eriority of Kultur," the speaker con-
cluded.
YOUNG WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
PRESENTS TWO SHORT COMEDIES
Washington's birthday was observed
last night at the Methodist church by
the Young Women's auxiliary which
presented two comedy playl=ts, "The
Love of Mary Jane and Benjamin" and
"The Deestreek Skool."
In addition to the plays, Mrs. Frieda
Westerman gave several readings, and
Hazel L. Allman, of the School of Mu-
sic, gave a piano solo. The Hawaiian
quartet also furnished music for the
occasion.
Dancing at Armory every Saturday
nighst, 9 to 12.-Adv.

Members of Collegiate Alumnae who
are to assist in the war registration
for women will meet at 2:30 o'clock
eastern time tomorrow afternoon with
Mrs. E. H. Croarkin, 649 South
Twelfth street.
Acts 1 and 2 of the Junior Girls'
play will rehearse at 9 o'clock this
morning at Barbour gymnasium.
Entire cast and chorus of "Let's
Go!" will rehearse at 10 o'clock this
-morning at the Union and at 3 o'clock
this afternoon at the School of Music.
Cotillion and athletic banquet tick-
ets should be secured at once at Bar-
bour gymnasium.

and whispered, "We-er-of the service
don't order this," pointing toward the
glass. She showed him his yellow
check.
"We don't charge for it."
"I'm sure it's-er- very kind of you,
but Gin Daisies and the O.D. don't-
a-hem- go very well together."
"Quit yer kiddin'," she came back,
"We serve the aqua pura with Every-
thing."
"Seventy-five Religious at Camp
Travis~-Times-News headline. Our
evening. contemporary must have a
remarkably esoteric definition of the
term.
Better think over what Professor
McLaughlin said yesterday. In the
first place, it's worth thinking about,
and in the second place, you will have
to tell your alumnus dad all about
"Andy Mac" when you go home.

And

SUDENTS -UPPLIES
For All Departments

At

WA H'S

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES

SECOND
SEMESTER

CARYATID.

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
TEL EGRAPHY?
We can furnish you with Keys, Sounders, Buzzers,
Wire Batteries, Etc.
TH E EBERBACH & SON COMPANY
200-204 E. Liberty Street

The Literary Critic Saysj

I
i

To awake with' a sore throat and
sincere hate toward all,
To take' a bath, like unto the m
baths of Konigsburg, Germany.
To don the new spring diguise,
To find it snowing,
To gallop down State,
To miss breakfast,

al

.ud f

To fall into the Big Unknown at the
corner of the Campus,
To blot up the mud and water there-
fro'm,
To skid into class late,
To have the instructor stop, noting
the soupson of terra firma on the
damask che'ek;
Ali, THESE are the joys of a Spring
Morning.
Never again will he scrub from the
back of his neck the little green cir-
cle made by wearing a 14K collar but-
ton. The service has its compensa-
tions.
A Cub's Contribution
Ring on, you futile Ben-clock,
I care not for your chimes.
My 8 o'clock I'm going to bolt,
I've bolted it six times.
_ I worked upon The Daily
SUntil the early morn;.
I've got to get some sleep, and so
That 8 o'clock I scorn to g-Aw,
Jim, leggo the covers, yeah-I'll
get up-where's my sock- gee,
the room is cold.
He came back in Uniform. He
slipped into one of our famed ice
cream and goo -emporiums, and whisp-
ered to the beauteous waitress, "Hot
Chocolate." You could tell by his
gaunt expression that he .had gone
rungry in Ann Arbor and thirsty in
Battle Creek. She brought the cho-
colate, and with it a mysterious bev-
erage. He raised the glass to the level
of his eyes and visualized the days
when he had valiantly fought King
William in his own habitat, The Foun-
tain Room. He beckoned the fair one

THE TWICE AMERICAN, by Eleanor
M. Ingram.-J. B. Lippincott com-
pany.
An ambitious little newsboy of New
York who, by a series of strange ad-
ventures, comes to South America,
makes a name for himself as a states-
man, his guiding force ever the mem-
ory of the tiny aristocrat who gave
him her white shoes because he was
cold-such is the theme of Eleanor
Ingram's highly romantic novel, "The
Twice American." How Dom David
Noel goes about to win the fame and
fortune that he has sworn must be his
before he will return in search of his
little princess, and his strange meeting
with her, make up the threads from
which the story is woven.
The most surprising thing about the
book is its fluctuating weakness and
strength. For example, the portraits
of the principal characters are poor-
ly painted and leave us with only a
very negative impression, while that
of Corey Bruce, of relatively small
importance, is excellently done, and
probably the best feature of the book.
Furthermore, at times the develop-
ment of the plot is so painfully ap-
parent that we chafe at the delay in
its unfolding, while at others we are
taken entirely by surprise.
On the whole, the tale is interest-
ing reading, although it is often a
trifle melodramtic, and rather too co-
incidental to be convincing. The
descriptions, for the most part, are
well drawn, and the scenes in the pris-
on at Rio Nabuco are especially good.
Rabbi Felix Levy to Speak Here
Rabbi Felix Levy of Chicago, will
be the speaker at the meeting of the
Jewish Students' congregation at 7
o'clock Sunday evening at the Bible
Chair house, 444 South State street.
The subject of his sermon has not yet
been announced.

E

New and Secondhand

-;

Bouhtand Sold

Sler'sBokS p
e 3

Dancing at Armory every Saturday
night, 9 to 12.-Adv.
You will find what you want
through the Daily want ads.--Adv.

Sale of
Hart Schaffner &
Marx Clothes

! Spring xfords
Are Here
HE new fookwear for spring dis-
tinctly indicates the military
trend to the lines of men's
shoes. There is but little fancy:
stitching while plain toes are
among the most popular models.
Our entire main floor is devoted to
® men's footwear. The model illus-
trated is one of the more popular
oxfords for spring wear.
This oxford, with its low heel and plain toe is one of the
more popular models for spring. It comes in tan or black
Russian calf with welt soles. ............. . .. ..$8.00
OTH tR MODELS $5.00 TO $10.00
l Main Floor
j r:E ST 1866
- -
11031 5 'Wofd-rd', Ave. Detroit, Mich.
X681f1 lllll 1||$lle 1i 8 1H H I i iii lilill lilllil 8lill llhlllilii11 l111i 11i 1i 11ii @1t

Young Men's Models
in Overcoats and Suits
C .. t a M
1~1
Suits and Overcoats
$32.50 and $35.00 Values at
$26.50
$28.00 and $30.00 Values at
$22.50
$261.00 and $25:00 Values at
$20.00
$20.00 and $22,40- Values at
$16.50
$16.00 anal $13.00 Values at
$15 Values at.
$13.50
COME IN
Reinse, Coidng feel G o,
3oathwast Cor. Fain and Washington
The Home of Hart Schaffner &
larx Clothes.-

DETROIT uNi7ED LINES
Between DT)roit, Ann Arbor and Jacksnm
(liffctive May 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and £xpre!s Cars-7:35 a
in., 8 :ro a, ., 271,and hour ly to 7 :IO P. W., 9:15
ru. m.
Kalanmzoo Limited Cars--"8:48 a. i nr
eve r1 Io hnurs to 6:48 . m.; to Lansng,
8:48 p. n.
Jackson Express Cars i.ocal -stof- west of
n Arbor)-9:48 a. ni. nd every two hours
to 2:4" n. m.
Local Cars East Bound-5:35 a. n., 6:40
a. m., 7:o5 a. in. and evI)y teO hoars to 7: S
p ..8 o:.0 n 9:O p. n., ,) o p. m.
1 ,aud only, Q:20 a -, 9:"? a I.,
2:0 '. n., 6:o p. m . 9:45 p. m, 1:4 5 .. m.,
12 :70 a-_ .. : ioa.,, , 1.'0 a. rn!. '0 1;ue'
Locai -Cars Weat Bound- -6:o 5 m 7 4
a. n , 10:20 p. in.. 12z:2o a m.
We have both the inclination and
the eguipment to furnish the
best in banking serice
TheAnOAlror Sans Bank
1NC:ORPCRATED 1869
Capital and Surplus $ 50,000 00
Resources . . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
747 North University Avenue
IF IT'S ANYTHING
PHOTOGRAPHIC, ASK,
SWAIN
113 East University
StfOf AT
338 MAYNARD
Fcr Lunches and Sodas
-... TYtE WRITERS
R For Sale and Rent
TYPLlMITIN
Ii ieograplag.
'rueraity ad Social Stationery
3iSouth fstate Street
Your every Bank-
ing need fulfilled at
TH
Farmers & Mechanics Bank

I

I

101-105__Lo. Main

330 So. $tate St.
(Nickels Arcade)

uI

I

tell us that we must
,atoes for bread. The
ain.
ought a baby bond yet?
y increase one cent in

Do You Know that the
SUGAR BOWL
has one of the best equipped
Candy Stores in the state?
They have their own Refrigerating
System, and -make their own Ice
Cream and Candies.
You arealinvited to visit and in-
spect their plant. .:..:
Phone 967 109 S. Main St

'f

t Camaufiage was

A

iT SERVICE

DINNER DANCI

Fb ST EQUIPPED CAFE IN ANN ARBOR

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