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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

)N HATS
ng are Here

INSPECTION

- p

tams & o
MAIN STREET
AT WASHINGTON

THAT OLD SUIT
looks like a hopeless case banging1

in.

the closet. Well, don't worry, let us
dry clean and press it for you-it is
good for lots of wear yet, and think of
the saving. Bring it in or let us call
today.
ANN ARBOR STEAM
DYE WORKS
PRONE 628
FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large

vi

be

IL

Is

service

WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
".The Shop of Quality"
it's not right we nke it right
-PHONE 273-

MIGHIGAN MEN AROA
PREPARINGTO BATIT E
PAUL EATON, EX-'19, CALLS. AVI-
ATION BEST BRANCH IN
SERVICE
Michigan's representatives in the
aviation corps overseas are being
prepared to "hunt the Hun," accord-
ing to a letter from Paul Eaton, ex-
'19, to Homer Heath, '07, general sec-
retary of the Union. He is now
"somewhere in France," with the
American expeditionary forces. Ex-
tracts from the lettVr, dated Jan. 20,
follow:
"Your letter of Dec. 17 received
yesterday afternoon. Believe me, I
surely was glad to hear fro you. I
had heard before receiving your letter
how Michigan's football team had
behaved toward the last of the sea-
son. There is a Northwestern man in
our bunch, and he took particular
pains to tell me about that game. You
are right when you say that 'over-
confidence does not seem to do much
good for individuals.' One finds that
out in this game especially,
Urges Bigger Game
"Next year's football schedule
surely.is a stiff one. I sincerely hope
that we are more successful than we
were last season. However, I would
rather see Michigan go down to dee,
feat every time than have on the team
a bunch of men who should be play-
ing a bigger game than football,
"I am glad to know that so many of
my old friends whom you have men-
tioned have successfully passed their
aviation exams. It is the best branch
of the service, without a doubt. If I
ever have the good opportunity to re-
turn to the dear old United States and
I -can get a machine, I'll surely take
you up first. Now that I have learned a
number of the tricks of the trade, I
believe I can make that ride very in-
teresting and somewhat exciting for
Take Cros-Country Trips
"Sime writing yon last, I have
moved to another field away from the
main camp, Here we are flying still
faster machines and having a real
good time out of it. When we first
came here, we practised form4tion
flying in groups of three, five, and ten,
and finally fifteen. After that was
learned, we commenced taking cross-
country trip. About five of us would
start off together, following some
leader. He would lead us all over
this god-forsaken country and we
would have to watch our maps so we
could tell him on our return just
where we had een. The next step
was to go to some town and draw the
railroad yards, a munitions factory,
or some other buildings, being pro-,
tected from above by a formation.
"Now I am practising combat work.
Two machines go up and try toc
'shoot' each other-without machinet
guns, of course. You get so devilish
excited that you put your machines in
positions that you would never think
of trying if you were just flying alone.
It is mighty good practice, for it's
next" to the real thing,.
"Your letter was a very newsy one.-
Bill Casgrai4 also appreciated read-y
ing it. In fact, it was so good that I
am taking the liberty of forwarding
it to Dr. Vibbert and asking that he
show it to some of the Michigan boys
who are continually dropping in. I!
know how glad they will be to read
it, for they all know you and are in-1
terested in what you have to say. I

believe there are more besides mysqlf
who have wondered why more Michi-
gan men have not enlisted, and your1
letter will give them the correct in-
formation."
POST OFFICE ANNOUNdS
NO J]ELIVERIES FOR TODAY1
Both the main post oflice on Main
street and the one in Nickels Arcadea
are to be open this morning only from
8 to 9 o'clock, central atandard time.;

NEW DRAFT TREATIES
AFFECT ANNARBOR MEN
FORTY ENGLISH AND CANADIAN
STUDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR
U. S. SERVICE
Approximately 65 men, in this city
are affected by the newly signed draft
treaties between England, United
States, and Canada, making any sub-
ject of those countries in the United
States eligible for the British draft.
About 40 of these are enrolled in the
University. The remainder are resi-
dents of Washtenaw county.
These figures submitted by Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall and County Clerk
Edwin H. Smith who is chairman of
the Washtenaw county draft board,
are not positive estimates, since the
complete records of the number of
men affected by the new treaty regu-
lations are not yet drawn up. Regis-
trar Hall will not know how many
students come under this class until
April, when the list of studentsat-
tending the University will be made
out according to the states and coun-
tries from which they come, He bases
his estimate on the number of Canad-
ian and English students who enrolled
last year. These total 47, and sub-
tracting the possible number of girls,
and men under the draft age, would
leave about 40 to be affected,
County Clerk Smith stated that
there are only about 25 men in Wash-
tenaw county who come under the
head of British subjects. "There have
been more," he said, "but in the ma.
jority of cases they prefer to serve the
United States and few of them have
claimed exemption on the ground'of
being British citizens. As a matter of
fact, a good many of them are taking
out first papers for citizenship" The
complete list of Britis subjects will
be made out within a month by the
county board.
MILITARY NEWS
No additional lists for R. O. T. C.
uniforms were posted on the bulletin
boards last night. Every cadet whose
name has already appeared on the
lists, but has not received a suit, will
report from 9 to 12 o'clock this morn-
ing at Henry and Company on North
University avenue.
Sixteen hundred pairs of shoes were
given out to the cadets in three hours
yesterday afternoon in the basement
of the Waterman gymnasium.
R. 0. '1. C. and U. of M insignia,
which have been ordered to the en-
tire cadet corps, will probably arrive
on Feb. 25. The design is in accord-
ance with the specifications from the
quartermaster-general.
There will be no athletic, gymnastic,
or military exercises this afternoon.
The advance and make-up classes
will also be dismissed tonight. Make-
up classes will be held from 9 to 11
o'clock tomorrow morning in Water-
man gymnasium.
Sink or Swim
The rain was coming down in tor-
-rents, transforming the plots of frozen
grass into artificial lakes. Small
pieces of land shoved their noses over
the top, forming minute islands.
At 4:14 o'clock a medium sized
rookie ws urry tg across the cam-
pus to join his company on North

1 niversity avenue. One minute more
ands he would be marked late. By tak-
ing a short cut across the lawns
between the Natural Science and
Chemistry buildings he would be able
to reach his position in line when
the roll call was taken.
An archipelago offered the needed
assistance. The rookie had traversed
five of the bits of land before he
realized that his progress was sud.

rug

- Stuits and Oco

kN DAILY

HOT DRINKS
that will make you more thoroughly enjoy the snappy
cold of winter.
A HOT CHOCOLATE OR LEMONADE aft
skating trip makes you feel great. LET US SHOW YC
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We guarantee to make your uniform fit you and to
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DRY CLEANING

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A.
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F.IMARQUARDT
TAILOR 514' E. William

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W household a
ry member of i
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MOE L
tone 236

peace to th-'
of mind to
ill look after
onscientious

UNDRY
$04 No. ]lain St.

,Chop S'uey
Rot Rolls 2 for 5c
MICHIGAN INN
on. 948.R $01 E. Liberty
xtension Lectures
rof. Clarence Meader will lecture

Prof. A. F. Shull will lecture to-
morrow night in Hesperia on "Hered-
ity and Its Practical Application,"
Begin Building
Opera Scenery
Scenery for "Let's Go," is now in
the process of construction, 0 A.
Schoessling, who will do the painting,
and William Saxton, stage carpenter,
are now at work on the scenery,
Mr. Schoessling was formerly con-
nected with the Selig Folyscope com-
pany, and while with them painted the
scenes for "The Spoilers," "Lost in
the Jungles," and "The Adventures of
Kathryn." He has also done some
work for the University of Minnesota.
Some delay in the construction of
the scenes has been occasioned by the
non-arrival of certain materials from
Detroit, but Mr. Schoessling and Mr.
Saxton hope to- have the work well
under way by the, beginning of next
week.
Further rehearsals for the opera
were held yesterday afternoon and
night, and the entire cast and chorus
will rehearse at 10 o'clock this morn-
ing and at 2 o'clock this afternoon,
both times at the Union.
Class dancing .at the Packard Acad-
emy Monday and Thursday evenings,
7:30 to 9:30. Private lessons by ap-
pointment. Phone 1850-F.-dv.

' TYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPEWRITING
Mimneographing
Fraternity and Social Stationery
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
GERMAN PAER LOSE
STAATS - ZEITUNG CIRCULATION
DECREASES WITH CHANGE
POLICY
Chicago, Feb. 21,-The Staats-Zei-
tung, a German newspaper here, has
lost over 10,000 subscribers since it
began preaching Americanism.
It w'as thought, at first, that the loss
was much greater, Judge Landis, in
a speech given to the press, said
that the circulation of the paper had
decreased to about one-fourth or one-]
fifth of what it was prior to the enact-
ment of the war resolution by con-
gress.
The statement was qualified, how-
ever, when the managing editor of the
Staats-Zeitung called on Judge Landis,
and said that the total circulation of
the paper on December 1, 1917, was
36',170 as compared with 46,994 on
April 6, 1917, showing a loss of
10,824.

Try our Chop
C hinese and American

IF IT'S ANYTHING
PHOTOGRAPHIC, AS]
SWAIN
113 East University
STO P AT
ITUTTLES
338 MAYNARD
For Lunches and Sodas
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITIN
BOOKKEEPING
PENMANSH
Classes Just Starting. Enro
TIwday
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William
FEBRUARY ALUMNUS CONTA
ARTICLES ON WAR PROB
The February Michigan Alum:

413 s.State St.

Ph

WAI KING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.

lht in Hesperia on
ia."
of. R. D. T. Hollister
ng of "The Rivals"
iville.

"Changing'
will give a
tonight at

rof. Edward R. Turner will lecture
ght in Freemont on "The Cathed-
Towns of France."
r, A. S. Warthin will speak tonight

Shoes repaired while yoy wait.
G. Andres, 222 S. State St.-Adv.

'0.

..........

e Copy
ra's and

I '

.11

Leave. Copy=
t
Stuaents
Supply Store

A

WAN~TED
An opportunity to sorTO
et us help you through this
of The Miohizan Daily.
-Let ue supply you with
on went through this 0ol-

FOR RIE?4T

FOR RENT - First class rooming
house, furnished or unfurnished-
Suitable for club of 15 or 20, Phone
799-M. 602 Monroe St.
FOR RENT-To Army Stores Men-
one suite in private family, central-
ly located, well heated, 407 E, Hur-
on. Phone 1384-AT,
FOR RENT - Very attractive large
room. Fine neighborhood, Private

Today's mail will be distributed Sat- {denly stopped. After meditating a few
urday and sonly general delivery and seconds the cadet made a desperate
special matter will be given out. leap for safety.
The postmaster wishes to make it When the top. sergeant called the
known that it will be useless for per- roll a watersoaked rookie answered,
sons to go to the main office, as these "Here."
rules are to be carried out in full.
More than 65 men are now enrolled
Contestants wanted to compete with in the R. O. T. C. band. The entire'
our Speed Marvels Friday night.- Varsity band enrolled in the corps
Adv, when the subject of a cadet organiza-
We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

tion was suggested to the men. The
men are drilling and- practicing every
week.
Dr. Charles U. Clark, former pro-
fessor of Latin at Yale, will give a
free illustrated and motion picture
lecture- at 8 o'clock Monday night in
Hill auditorium.' The reels have been
procured from the Italian government,
and the special set of slides have never
been shown in America.
Before the members of the R. U. T.
C., the College of Medicine, and Law
college Prof. Andrew C. McLaughlin,
University of Chicago, will deliver a
lecture on "England and America:
Their Common Traditions and Ideals,"
at 8 o'clock Tuesday night in Hill
auditorium.
Dancing at Armory every Saturday

a war number from
The editorials dealv
blems of our own
sities. The most inte
the magazine is, per
letters written by C
Breakey, '94M, in w
first hand account c
front.
An article on "Mic
vice," gives a partia
than 6,000 Michigan
the names of nine
service. The numbe
ual reports and clo
the new books rece
alumni. Among the
War Libraries" by '

the

r visible typewriter..

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