100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

Now,

Alway5

the bet for y tr m oneCY

adI ion's laCes i. cMlor' and turn-
I ug o Ung meCna

r f y~ .. .. -. ' r .
'

STATE STREET
COR ARCADE

T WO ST ORES
MAIN STREET
CUR. WASHINGTON

FOl

EVERYTHING
No J( o nil or e arge

If~~~~~~ it:ntriltve . e'~ i o

I.

Whave hh the inclination and
the eqpmet to furnish the
' q
ThyA rb ,a vin gs l B y y ank
Capta nd Surplus $ 500,900 00
Reouorces . . .$84,000,0000
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
SNorth Univcsty Avenue
HAND liIOrITTION FOR
ANN ARBOR TRAVELERS
LINES
.,it ThAror and Jackson.
FF' die My 2',1917)
])el'iti.i ita ad xpe's Cars-7 :35 a.
Li ,~ c a.mu a' 1 hurl to7:I4 P. II., 9 :I0
0. l
~.mc-m'ao Lii itd Crs f3;:48 a. n. andi
( . ~'I o h~ni I. (~i8 .In,; to Laicng,
lao c-~i L~~_. .Cats l ~clstops x et of
Ao ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e nA'r)-p:.a.ma ndo ry tw.o he-urs
u 7 tiIi iii
S C a o -a. n.6 :40
ci.~~~~~~~ il a m 10an cv(y s ]ou to 7:c05
't'o \'>iau~ nb. au m i.. '0:,;o a n.,
a cm ni. m ia a 1 .:u.oa. Mx r o saline,
t~otaI Cin;WestBoun 6 o5 a. Mn., 7 :45

200 117 i igu I 7lor
I Ann Aro-*, li

---

I'

"Just a LitLBTEa
for al oz.casions
2 .M n r
L. C. MT , .
cORONA,
w rter t , I
U I L W
0. d.P. M; F

I

$U F $2.25
We make a specialty of silk
shirts .'_All goods launder-
ed by hand .-. Goods called
ftr aud deWered .
Phon 23 5 204 N1 MAIN ST.

200 WOMEN ELECT
ATHLETIC OFFICERS
NEWLY ORGANIZED ASSOCIATION
MEETS FOR ELECTION
AND "PEP"
Officers of the Women's Athletic as-
sociation for the ensuing year are:
President, Clarissa Vyn; vice-presi-
dent, Marie Macauley; secretary,
Laura Peacock; treasurer, Margaret
Atkinson; s e n i or representative,
Louise Irish; -junior representative,
Doris MacDonald; sophomore repre-
sentative, Lucy Huffman.
These officers, with the exception of
the president, who was previously ap-
pointed, were elected at the women's
mass meeting in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall yesterday afternoon. At this
meeting, the constitution of the newly
independent athletic organization was
read to about 200 enthusiastic girls,
and its points of difference from the
old constitution particularly noted.
Printed slips, giving the system of
athletic honors were also distributed.
After the meeting, Miss Evans met
a number of upperclass girls inter-
ested in hockey. She urged all en-
thusiasts to report at once, beginners
as well as experienced players.
Marie Macauley, '18, chairman of the
membership committee, reports that
approximately 300 members were ac-
quired for the association as a result
of tag day yesterday.
Next week the department will hold
a "wienie roast" for members only
on Palmer field.
Spicy News From
Other Colleges
In order that college men may feel
at home when their regiment arrives
in Paris, the American University
Union has been opened and its head-
quarters are now in Paris.
W. H. Tinker, for a number of years
secretary at the local "Y," was re-
cently a visitor at the University of
Arizona. He is visiting many colleges
for the purposes of stimulating inter-
est in the "Y" work. His present title
is international secretary of the Y.
M. C. A.
It costs little to provide light for
the night practice of the varsity squad
at the University of California. Fig-
ures given out by the electric com-
pany which provides the current state
that the light averages six cents a day.'
"The German university student has
no real love for the cause of his fa-
therland," said ex-Ambassador James
Gerard in an interview granted to the
Daily Californian recently. "There is
not the willingness displayed by the
American youth to sacrifice everything
for his country. By the time that he
has reached the university, however,
le has served his time in the army
and has become a cog in the machine.
So he takes up arms and fights me-
chanically, without even trying to
think about the causes," stated Mr.
Gerard.
The high cost of living seems to
have passed by this spot on the earth's
surface.
The college of law at the University
of Illinois has lowered its tuition from
$25 to $15 per year. The probable
aim! of this reduction is to attract a
larger number of students to the law
college.

Most of the other colleges have in-
creased their tuition rates.
Farmers are in great demand now-
adays in order to harvest the enorm-
ous crops this year.
Prof. G. S. Christie of Purdue uni-
versity has begun a movement to in-
(uce students to work on farms Sat-
urdays and during their spare hours.
Regular wags are paid the men and}
their transportation to and from the
farms is allowed. Many of the students
have enrolled in this course to de-
velop their muscles, earn some coin,
and at the same time'do their bit for
food conservation.
Read the Daily advertisements.
They will lead you to the best of Ann
Arbor's storts.-Adv.

"Gimme Club "Has
;oooNewfrembers
About 3,000 assorted members will in
all probability be added toth ranks
of the "Gimme club" as the result of
the price of tobaccos soaring in Ann
Arbor. Those who use the "dope
sticks" will either in the future con-
serve their supply of the paper wrap-
ped weeds or more likely "sponge"
off of a more lucrative fellow.
Owing to the recent war tax impos-
ed by congress upon tobacco retailers
in the city united in raising the price
relative- to the article's cost.
He who formerly wallowed in the
delights afforded by King Omar now
finds relief in the more humble Chest-
erfield and he who found smypathy
and surcease in the "Desert Horse"
Is now scanning the show cases for a
two-bit pipe.
"Taxation without tobaccoation is
worse than tyranny."
GALLI - CURCI SINGS
IN FIVE LANGUAGES
Coloratura Soprano as Much at Home
on Concert Stage as in
Opera
Amelita Galli-Curci, the charming
coloratura soprano who will appear
at Hill auditorium Thursday evening,
Oct. 11, is an Italian by birth and won
honors as a pianist and composer be-
fore taking up her work on the con-
cert stage. Mme. Galli-Curci sings in
five languages and she is quite as
much at home on the concert as on
the operatic stage.
Manuel Berenguer, flutist, and
Homer Samuels, pianist, will assist
Mme. Galli-Curci in her concert here.
The program follows:
Program
1-(a) Caro Mio Ben........Giordani
(b) Per la Gloria .......Bonocini
2-(a) Vol che sapete from "Le
Nozzo di Figaro".....Mazart
(b) Tarantella from Napolitana.
.~Rossini
3-Bell Song from "Lakme" (in
French) ............Delibes
(With flute obligato)
4-(a) Minuet de Martini,
(b) Les Quinze ans de Rossette,
(c) Au Bord de la Fontaine.....
Pastorelles du XVLLI siecle
avec accompaniments de
Veckerlin.
(d) Chanson de Solveg.....Grieg
(e) Borbonaise f r o m "Manon
Lescaut" ....... ...... Auber
(In French)
5-Concerto in D.........Chaminade
Mr. Berenguer
6-(a) Little Dorry ..........Seppilli
(b) Maiden's Wish ........Chopin
(c) Carcelares (in Spanish).....
.....Chapi
7-Mad scene from "Lucia"..Donizetti
(With flute obligato)
FOOD CONSERVATION SCIENCE
TO BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOLS
Food Administrator Hoover, backed
by President Wilson, has asked that
the science of food economy be taught
in the schools throughout the United
States.
To this end circulars will be is-
sued every month containing lessons
on this subject. The first was issued
on Oct. 1, and will be followed by
others on the first of each month, up
to and including May.
The pamphlets will be in form to
put into the hands of the pupils and
there will be three grades: one for

pupils in the fourth, fifth and sixth
grades; one for those in the seventh
and eighth grades, and the first year
of high school; and the other will be
for the three remaining years of high
school.
Mr. Herbert M. Slauson, local sup-
erintendent of schools, has received an'
outline of the plan and expects the
board of education to take some action
upon it tomorrow at its monthly
meeting.
Small Attendance at German Classes
A decrease of 150 per cent is shown
in the freshman election of German
classes this year, a difference of about
200 from that of last year. In the
scientific courses the enrollment is
practically the same, with the excep-
tion of advanced scientific German,
which has decreased 10 per cent.

' s
l
// f
;, .
+
,. r
, ''
}I.e
it
\
.
4+
.
r

Calkins
Drug
Co.

324 So. 'State St. South U and Church St.

We hakye the tooth
brush to replace the
one 'that you forgot

University Students
You can get three square meals a day served in a wholesome
and appetising manner at the

I VA

Everything that is new in wool-
ens and in fashions is shown in the
big line and we know that you
will be impressed with the display
$18-$20-$25-$30
FURNISHINGS
FRESH CAPS
VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP

BOSWORTH INN

E DESC O
FINEST MADE-TO-MEASURE
CLOTHES

1

$5.00 per week

119 N. Thayer

PHONE 714

Try the
Fountain of Youth
.for your Candies-both boxed and plain
We make a specialty of light lunches. Call and try
them at
The Fountain of Youth
Corner of State and E. Liberty

I

d:. .. _.

asi

H if ts as y t pah.t -
graphic ask I
713 East Univers
FirstA
RE
XT I IN DEli i
Universit ekein Po01s()c
throughou
begiD.
Prof. Roet, M .iic o '
in Detroi CuLa ih. lo~
day while time lolt I . .(Vli-
in history andfn arm xKl
ranged by Pro: (lnc im. PPo
and Prof. 11 It. Cro >~ otm' i
Courses in Jackoiae

T
Fo unmees and Sodas

,,-. llliar

.1 oMxq Jewelry

Fountain Pens
Waterman
and ConKlin

drc & Seyfrled
. .n avis or-
.t zedvi ~mms iier ysterday and
eet classes
S~udo. att inteyear Prof.
~,'lhm . V'.ye 'i l oilr a course
I ei%.ar1' le k o e Uiversity
is an rden, for the
)in the registrar's
v to assume the
etary to II. G.
eld Construe-
L 01h , ich.

SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
PENMANSHIP
Classes Just Starting. Enroll
Today
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William
ALL-ENGINEER SMOKER TO
ECLIPSE THAT OF LAST YEAR
Elaborate preparations are being
made for the all-engineer smoker to
be held soonj under auspices of the
Engineering society. The smoker last
year was said by officers to be the
largest in the history of the depart-
ment, but plans are being made to
eclipse it this year. The program is
being selected carefully and the array
of talent appearing on that night will
be the best the committee can get.
There will be "eats" but it is hardly
probable that cider will be on the
menu, one member said yesterday, as
apples are very scarce in this vicinity.
Prof. Meader Gives lecture on Russia
Prof. C. L. Meader of the Russian
literature department, who is an au-
thority on Russian government, ad-
dressed the Students' society of the
Unitarian church last night on "Rus-
sia, the World Democracy."
This was the first of a series of Sun-
day night. lectures to be given on va-
rious countries of Europe. Among the
subjects will be "French War Liter-
ature," "Why We Are at War," and
"The Mexican Problem," the lectures
to be given by Professors Levi, Van
Tyne and Schurz, respectively.
Dean Jordan to Speak at First Vespers
Dean Myra B. Jordan will speak at
the Y. W. C. A. vespers at 4:30 o'clock
Wednesday. This is the opening serv-
ice of the year and all freshmen and
upper class girls are urged to come.
Marguerite Chapin, '20, who is in
charge of the vespers this year, is
planning on having special music for
this meeting.
Married students at the University
of Indiana meet every week to discuss
the high cost of living and other prob-
lems of married life.
Twelve Princeton men have been
decorated for bravery since the be-
ginning of the war.

MARQUARD
CAMPUS : TAILOR
be your outfitter unless you
want the Beet Woolena,
Accurate Fit, and Guar-
anteed Satisfaction.

i

Don't let

I

Lev Copy
' ty
arrrs and,

AflFFZES 6

h RCopy
at
I Spply Store

VOGUE, VARSITY FAIR, AND
DAILY ARE POPULAR IN GYM
Michigan women revealed a taste of
the highest intellectual order in their
choice of periodical literature last
year.
Vogue, Vanity Fair and The Daily
appeared on the reading tables in Bar-
bour gymnasium. From the nature of
the majority of the selections, we may
judge that the one worth perusal by
serious minded Varsity students was
subscribed to merely on account of a
burning, and indeed very commend-
able, patriotism.
It is an open question whether the
first year co-eds, and the upperclass
women coming from other colleges
will go to the other extreme and see
to it that only the Literary Digest and
the Scientific American accompany
The Daily for the present year.
Y. W. C. A. Membership Larger This
The University Y. W. has out strip-
ped all former records in membership
this year. More than 224 new mem-
hers are reported which is larger than
the total Y. W. C. A. enrollment four
years ago. The annual membership
campaign will be opened soon by 75
earnest women. A canvess of the en-
tire city will be made giving every
Michigan woman her chance to do a
little unselfish work.
Professor Gets Leave of Absence'
Prof. C. H. Kauffman, instructor in
plant pathology, has been granted a
leave of absence of one year by the
University and at present is doing re-
search work under the bureau of plant
industry at Washington. His place is
being filled by Dr. Gardner of the
University of Wisconsin.
The Daily's specialty is service to
everyone. Let us serve you.-Adv.

OR REsNT inlromfi c't'
10{}-11-12
1 .
OR RENT
heated, first floor fu Ido
furnished. 'Phon 02M 22
Twelfth. 1-12
OR RENT-Thre snt~~ ~ 1
$3 to one. 41 hmsn
OR RENT- Singl roo $1. 71
E. Huron.
WA KTE I
'ANTED -ColQ'ed mai fo coi
work. A pply 1204 11111. Phone a

-- and maroon
n eturn to Daily
LOS1 -anino Pieta pin. Return
to1 .niversty. Phone 378.
P pn Finder Please
i ersity. Re-
s in black case.
7 1n e 51 10
- - -UF -- - -----
WiLTILI pU'tY who traded hats at
th Arcadi retaurant please re-ex-
change. 10-11

Here, and here only, can be found the world's greatest
instruments---
Steinzva. Pianos, Knabe, Sohmer, Grinnel Bros.,
Vose & Sons, Shoninger, Sterling, Huntington,*
Mendelssohn
and many others. The home of Pianola player pianos and
Victor Victrolas.

GRINNELL BROS.

116 S. Main Street

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan