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February 17, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PREP
DAF AND NIG
SERVIC

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ANN ARBOR, MICII GAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1918.

PRICE

-.,----
. ;

1"

1

.

Snall

ss)
or General
ral William
he British
ancement is
to indicate
importance
the war on

'liament behind him
'appled with the
ituation and made
he view which so
at there should be
Af the allied army.
with the predicted
ng from the meet-
ae war council at

>bertson would not con-
General Wilson's place
h military representative
ne war council, nor was
, remain chief of staff
power."
on Quiet at Front.
t the military situation
aw signs of passing be-
nor stage of raids 'and
s, and of entering into
ration necessitating the
ns of men. Strong Ger-
.gainst British positions
nsiderable fighting south
Scarpe. The remainder
as quiet.
Mystery of

HOLD TRYOUTS FOR;
"PHORMIO" FEB. 21
Tryouts for this year's Classical
club play will be held for a second
time at 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon,
Feb. 21, at the Michigan Union.
Terence's "Phormio," the play sel-
ected for production on March 27,
contains but two feminine roles. A
number of men will be required, and
though competition here will not be
so keen, it is urged that every mem-
ber, active or associate, try out for
the parts. For the first time in the
history of the club, freshmen will be
eligible for the leads.
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the eng-
ineering college, has placed at the dis-
posal of the club an original transla-
tion of "Phormio." His version of it
is up-to-date in every respect, and
those who remember last year's Cos-
mopolitan club production, "The Magic
Carpet," will recall the standard of
Professor Nelson's work in this line.
UNIVER ITS IUS WILL
HELP REISTER WOMEN
PRELIMINARY CONFERENCE FOR
THEIR INSTRUCTON WILL BE
HELD THIS WEEK
After learning how to register at
the conference of the Michigan divi-
sion of the Women's committee of
national defense to be held next Tues-
day and Wednesday in Barbour gym-
nasium, several University women will
travel tirough the state during spring
vacation to assist in the registration
of the rest of the women of the state.
The instruction classes will be
held at ten o'clock on Wednesday
morning and at two o'clock in the af-
ternoon. At the close of the last
class those present will register each
other. The instruction which will
consist of detailed study of the regis-
tration card will be conducted by
Mrs. Fred B. Perkins and Mrs. Ray.
The program of the rest of the confer-
ence of which Rev. Caroline Bartlett
Crane is chairman follows:
10:00 o'clock Tuesday morning,
Statement of origin and aim of wo-
man's committee, with outline of state
departments of work, by Caroline Bart-
lett Crane; 15 minutes for questions
and discussions; brief report of Ann
Arbor unit. 2 o'clock Tuesday, ex-
planation of survey of local committee
needs, state chairman; brief address
by Prof. George E. Meyer on Women's
'Interest in Industrial Education; ad-
dress by Dr. Hubert W. Emerson on
"The Courses of Instruction on Food
for College Women". 3 o'clock Tues-
day, address to women students and
others on the registration of women
in Michigan, by Mrs. Fred B. Perkins;
address ~by Mrs. Fred B. Perkins on
"The Registration of Women in Illin-
ois."
GEORGE SISLER CHOSEN FOR
POSITION ON MYTHICAL NINE
George Sisler, the former Michigan
baseball star, is an easy winner of the
first base position on the All-league
team in the American circuit last
season. His record with the St. Louis
Browns places him well above his
nearest competitor, Gainor, of Boston.
'His grand average is .669, twenty7
points higher than Gainor's. The for-
mer Wolverine hit fifty points higherj
than any other first baseman and his

fielding average was so slightly un-
der some of the other's that it had
practically no effect on his grand
average.
This is indeed a remarkable record
for a young eollegian playing his
first full season in big league circles.
It is doubtful if it has ever been
equalled in the annals of baseball.
Certainly, much is to be expected from
this youth when he has had a little
more experience in big league cir-
cles.

CAR.PENTERS' HEAD
'SEEKS CONFERENCE
Appeals to President to be Allowed
to State Men's Side of
Case
ALLEGES DIFFICULTY CAN BE
READILY SETTLED AFTER TALK
Wilson Expected to Take Definite Pos-
e Ition to Hasten Building
Activtiy
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 16. - Efforts by
the government to end the strikes of
carpenters in eastern shipyards
brought about two important devel-
opments today which officials declar-
ed promised to effect an early settle-
ment.
President Wilson prepared to take
some action in the situation, the na-
ture of which has not been disclosed,
and the adjustment board handed down
a wage award covering Delaware
River and Maryland shipyards which
is to form a basis for a general ship-
building wage scale in the east.
Insisting that he was unable to call
off the strike of shipbuilding carpen-
ters, 10,000 of whom are said to have
failed to report for work today in
plants on the Atlantic coast, William
L. Hutchinson, president of the broth-
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners to-
night sent a telegraphic appeal to'
President Wilson and Se retary Dan-
iels asking for a conference. He ex-
pressed the belief that the President
and Secretary Daniels could quickly
settle the trouble if he would be per-
mitted to state the men's case to them.
The President is expected to' express
a definite view on the situation in re-
ply to the telegram.
UNION PLANS FOR SERIES OF
LECVTIrES ON WAR SITUATION

Because only 25 students enrolled,
the courses in naval training have
been cancelled for the present sem-
ester. These courses were known as
naval science and tactics la, lb, and
lb. It was necessary that at least 48
sign up in order to permit satisfac-
tory work.
Similar to 3ilitary Training
The courses were to be similar to
the military training course now
being taught here. Students selecting
the naval work would have been ex-
cused from military training, and
would have given two hours daily,
five days each week to the work. This
would have given them two hours of
credit. Professors Boak, Bragg, Paw-
lowski, and Sadler were to have taught
the courses, and two years of the work
vould have fitted the students to
become ensigns."
"The failure of the course is un-
doubtedly due to the suddenness with
which it was announced," said Profes-
sor Boak yesterday. "Probably many
more would have elected it had it been
started last fall."
Separate From Naval Reserve
This course is entirely separate from
the naval reserve unit being formed
here by the Navy department. The lat-
ter is a group of technical students
who will be trained as second class
seamen, and is similar to the en ineer-
ing reserve.
It was stated that the students will
perhaps have a chance to elect the
course in naval science again next
year. If enough men enroll, the unit
will be formed as the Michigan naval
unit. Those entering it will not be.
forced to join the Navy, and will not
be exempted from the draft.
1USICA L PR OxR A M FE A T URE S
WEEKLY 3IXER AT UNION
Violin and Vocal Solos and "Jazz"
Music Will Entertain Those
Attending
Music, both vocal and instrument-
al, will feature the program of the
mixer to be held from 3 to 5 o'clock
this afternoon at the Union.
O. O. Patton, School of Music, will
give a vocal solo, with piano accom-
paniment by Wilson J. Kellar, School
of Music. Robert Berman, '19, violin-
ist of the Varsity Mandolin club, is to
render a violin solo, accompanied by
A. 3. Gornetzky, '19L. "Jazz" will be
furnished by an orchestra composed
of Uri A. Carpenter, '20, Carl H. Wil-
mot, '19, Oliver H. Morton, '19, C. C.
Buehrer, '19, and C. C. Hamill, '21.;
Faculty members and businessmen of
Ann Arbor are, as usual, extended a
cordial invitation to attend.
Community singing will be started
next Sunday at the Union, under the
direction of Robert Dieterle, '21M, and
Earl V. Moore, '11, School of Music.

Necessary

That at Least 48 Sign Up
to flake Course
Successful

ABANDON COURSES
IN NAVALTRAINING
('lasses May Be Given Next Semester
If Large Enough Number
Enroll
SMALL ENROLLMENT DUE TQ
LATENESS OF ANNOITNVEMENT

SUBMIT 10 POSTERS
FOR UNION OPERA
About 10 posters have been sub-
mitted in the "Let's Go" poster contest
which closes today. The winning
placard will be chosen this week.
Cast rehearsals for the opera will
begin this week, as soon as the mus-
Io is ready. It is probable that final
cast try-outs for men will be held at
7:30 o'clock Monday evening at the
Union. Those competing for places
are asked to watch the Union bulletin
board for confirmation of this.
Women's chorus rehearsals will be
held at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon
in the School of Music.
The women members of the chorus
have been practicing for the past
week. The general chorus rehearsals
and try-outs held Friday brought out
several new women aspiring to .places
in the opera. The rehearsals have
consisted of learning parts of the mus-
ic and dances.
PROFESSOR WARD GIVES
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
SOCIAL WORKER WILL GIVE FIVE
LECTURES FROM SUNDAY
TO TUESDAY
Rev Harry Ward, professor of so-
cial service in Boston university, sec-
retary of the Methodist federation for
social service, and author of numer-
ous books and pamphlets gave an
Introductory lecture last night.
Churches and press,,sad Mr. \Ward,
instead of pointing out ideals neces-
sary for reconstruction after the war
are echoing the sentiment of ordin-
ary public opinion. The world today
is at the point to make the decision
between universal militarism and
peace in the near future. If military
training is accepted in America, South
America and China and others will
follow and the result will be a world
in arms.
"In this country there are but few
idealists capable of intelligently
chosing, among these ate President
Wilson and Secretary Baker. It is
the duty of religion to help make
this intelligent choice and reckon the
results. Neither the church nor any
institution is prepared for this task.
"In Europe because the university
group does not live with the common
people the students cannot be leaders.
In America it is much different. If a
choice is made for world cooperation
the choice must be made by the col-
lege people."
This subject will be taken up more
concretely in the five following le-
tures by Prof. Ward under the general
topic "Making a New World"; "The
Need of a New World" at 10:30 o'clock
Sunday at the Methodist church;
"The Cry of the Children" at 12 o'clock
at the First Baptist church; "The
Voice of Labor" at 7:30 o'clock, Sun-
day evening at the Methodist church;
"Making Money or Men" at 7 o'clock
Monday evening at the Congregation-
al church; "Masters or Servants" at
7 o'clock Tuesday evening at the Con-
gregational church.
115 Enroll In Navigation Course.
One hundred and fifteen students
have enrolled in the course in navi-
gation which is to be given by Prof.
R. H. Curtiss in the department of
astronomy this semester.
In order to accommodate this un-
expectedly large $registration, three
lecture sections and four laboratory
divisions have been organized. The

lecture sections are scheduled as
follows: Section I, Monday, Wednes-
day, and Friday at 9 o'clock in room
109, Tappan hall; section II, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at 10 o'clock
in room 106, Tappan hall, section III,.
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at
9 o'clock in room 109, Tappan hall.
The laboratory sections meet at the
Observatory from 1 o'clock to 4 o'clock
on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and
Friday.

Appoint

TEUTONS
AGAINST

BOLSHEVI

Commnittee Composed
Faculty Men and
Students

of

is that mystic combination
appeared on the little tags
many men on the the cam-
they advocating a new draft
limit, are they supporting the
ortion of war bread flours, or
Scelebratng a basketball
hese are some of the questions
have been asking themselves
icing the pasteboards.
iblicity manager of the Var-
and Mandolin clubs cleared
in regard to the matter yes-
'hen he announced that the
been issued to call attention
ite and price of the Musical
ncert to be held Wednesday
n Hill auditorium. The date
D and the price 35 cents.
ements have been made to
Hill auditorium box office
dnesday afternoon after 4:30
o that tickets may be pur-
here. Several stores on the
have tickets on sale at pres-
they may be procured from
of the clubs. Wahr's, Shee-
usy Bee, Union, Grinnell'
Alimendinger's, the Delta,
le's, the Arcade Florist, and
rsity Music House are handl-
Campus stores in Ypsilanti
e a supply. The sale has
eptionally good, the first num-
d being 500 for the conven-
grocers that will meet here
r.
ibs are in readiness for their
debut, and Mr. Theodore Har-
ector of the Glee club, is con-
,t the concert will be the best

In order to arrange for a series
of popular -lectures on the war situ-
ation, a committee composed of four-
faculty members and three students,
was appointed yesterday by the Union.
The committee is as follows: Prof.
Ralph W. Aigler, chairman, Dean John
R. Effinger, Prof. John R. Brumm,
Prof. Lewis W. Gram, George F. Hur-
ley, '18L, E. K. Cunliffe, '19, and Mark
K. Ehlbert, '20.
The purpose of the lectures will be
to acquaint the students and towns-
people with the European situation,
and the political and economic condi-
tions leading up to the present con-
flict. The speakers will be chosen
both from the faculty and from citi-
zens of this and other cities.
The lectures will probably begin
within the next week or 10 days, and
will be given at the rate of one a
week for the balance of the current
semester. They will be held at a con-
venient hour, so that all may be able
to attend.
50 Fail To Remain In University
About 50 students of the literary
college have gone home because of
poor scholarship. 15 of these went
home without being sent, the remaind-
er left after receiving official notices
from the university.

PEACE DREAMS
TO BE FADING
Poles, Angered by Loss o
Threaten to Shatter A
.ation Plans
(By Associated Pr
Amsterdam, Feb. 16.-Ge:
are being concentrated in
an attack on the Bolshev
ing to a Berlin dispatch
newspaper, and declara
ing toward the active prc
ing toward the active prc
war against the Bolshevilk
ern' Russia will be made n
The Bolshevgs are mal
sale arrests of Germans in
are holding them as .ho
cording toea dispatch from
hundred Germans and as
Germans have been arrested
All food has been confiscal
Bolsheviki threaten whole
cry. Germany has served
she will make reprisals f
prisoners are harmed.
Austria Hilds Back T
The Austrian minister of
fairs has notified Berlin th
troops must not be used ag
to support any policy wh
has not approved, 'but on
poses of self defense agai
ing bands,
Germany Troubled f
Germany has suddenly
self involved in a maze of
on the eastern front, andi
in danger of losing all
she was preparing to realia
peace with Ukraine, and
drawal of Russia from the
Poland is now threateni
stitute herself- as the roc
the German hopes of peace
sion in the east may be shai
ered by the tearing away o
their territory to be given
as' a reward for breaking
the Bolsheviki and signir
treaty with the central ]
Poles are in a state of s
A general strike in Warsa
from Amsterdam presages
path ahead for the peac
The Polish armies, the ve:
which Germany and Austri
pains to forge, bid fair to t
them. The military are pa
streets of Warsaw.
Commissions Leave P
The commission repres
central powers at Petrog'r
the city and returned witi
lines. A dispatch from Sofi
declares that Bulgaria h
diplomatic relations with
is claimed, however, that
central powers are in agre
the situation.
USING FREIGHT CARS 1
STORAGE BLOCKS
Lansing, Mch., Feb.
thousands of freight cars
purposes is responsible
congestion, Charles C C
state railroad commission
day. He classed priorit
orders as handicaps to fr
ments.
"I believe too heavy cu
passengeri trains was a
Cunningham said.
situatiohL improves, I irite
the matter up with some o
But with respect to freis
the roads are doing all the
kepp it moving."

t

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division

10:30 A. M. (Eastern Time)
First service in Lenton Season

THEME:

"LIFE INVESTMENTS"

i

)

Glee & Mandolin Club Concert

I -

80 Live Musicians.

Hill Auditorium

8:15 P. M., Easteri Time

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