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February 13, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-13

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PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, ,WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1918.

PRICE9

--- _,

# i

MOUNTAIN CLIMBER
TO LECTURE TODAY

LdU

IN

'ONE WITH
OF WILSON

Has Not
Sed

Stereoptican Views to Feature Travel-
ogue Given in Natural Science
Building.
Colored stereoptican views will be
a feature of the travel lecture to be
given at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium by
Frank Branch Riley, the well-known'
mountain climber. The subject of the
talk will be "The International North-
west," and with Mr. Riley will come
the photographer of the views.
Mr. Riley is one of the most popular
lawyers of Portland, Oregon, and a
founder of the Apollo club, the cele-
brated men's chorus of that city, He
is a leading niember of the Mazamas,
a climbing organization, and organized
the Drama league of Portland, which
is sponsoring the Little Theatre move-
ment in that city.
The lecture this afternoon will be
under the auspices of the Oratorical
association and is free to the public.
RUSSIA MAY RELESE
13500,000 PRISONERS

3y Associated Press)
-King George ana Premier
orge in addresses to the
parliament have declared
t in the recent uttances of
sman of the Teutonic allies
1 be found no basis for a
ch will fulfil the demands of
cratic governments.
kers Agree With Wilson
Iresses of both the monarch
prime minister were at one
ident Wilson's speech to con-
iday. King George declared
I there was recognition of
principles upon which an
peace could be con -
luty of the British to prose-
war with all the vigor they
>yd George asserted that
Wilson's estimate of the
eeches of the Imperial Ger-
icellor and the Austrian
inister was a correct one.
that the British government
eceded an iota from its an-
war aims.
ary Activity Increases.
itary activity on the western
laily increasing in volume.
1 encounters are being car-
by larger parties than has
case since the severe winter
d more zest is being added
ghting.
z the Americans and the
there is a constant exchange
ry fire and the Americans
;o carry out patroling man-
>wards the enemy trenches.
ians evidently are anxious
the positions occupied by
[cans and also to ascertain
er of men they are employ-
ike at Italian Front.
Italian front the Austrians
re endeavored to test the
>f the Italians in the Sette
plateau sector. The German
asserts that the Austrians
it a most successful attack
the Italian official communi-
clares that the Austrian
were t6rn to pieces by the
tillery and the offensive
r repulsed.

MILITARY MEN UNDAUNTED
NEW SITUATION DUE TO'
PEACE PACT.

BY

(By Associated Press)'
Washington, Feb. 12-With the open-
ing of the great campaign of 1918 on
the western front apparently within
sight, military men here examined
today with profound interest the situ-
ation created by the signing of a
peace pact between the central powers
and the new Ukraine republic and the
decision of the Bolsheviki Russian
government to stop fighting and de-
moblize the army. Their conclusions
were not discouraging.
' Prisoners May go Free
One of the threats against the west-
ern front dwelt upon in public dis-
cussion is the fact that presumably
1,500,000 prisoners of war held in
Russia would be released to strength-
en the German army. The fact is said
to be however that the great majority
of the soldiers captured by the Rus-
sians are Austrians, not available for
western front operation by present
indications. Most of the others are
civilians or camp followers of one
kind or another and so far as known
only a small number of German troops
were captured on that front. Any
men from the prison camps are re-
garded as of doubtful military value
for some time to come, as the Rus-
sians, unable to feed their own soldiers
hardly had improved the health of
captives.
Troops Cannot be Withdrawn
Demobilization of the Russian army
will not mean that the Austro-German-
Bulgar forces on the frontiers can be
wholly withdrawn. There will be a
constant threat of renewed hostilities
and the Teutons must see to it that
ample force is always on hand.
In fact diplomatic. observers say
Germany is confronted with the most
difficult and unprecedented problem
she has met during the present war
as a result of the declaration that
Russia has abandoned hostilities with-
out the signing of a peace treaty.
* * * * * * 'I * * * * * *

UNI1FORMS TODA
Names of Those Whose Suits Have
Arrived. Are Posted in Water-
man Gymnasium
SHOES ARE VERY GOOD; .
TO BE GIVEN OUT LATER
Men Must Appear at Time Scheduled
Or Lose Places On
List
Regulation R. O. T. C. uniforms, in-
cluding caps and leggins, will be dis-
tributed to the cadets during the day,
according to an -announcement given
out by Lieut. George C. Mullen last
night. A list containing the names of
the men whose uniforms have arrived
was posted last night on the bulletin
board in Waterman gymnaisum.
, The uniforms will be handed out
from 9 o'clock this morning until a
late hour this afternoon through
Henry and Company of North Univer-
sity avenue, who Mandel Brothers of
Chicago, the contractors, have com-
missioned to handle their interests loc-
ally. If a cadet fails to appear at the
time scheduled on the list his name
will automatically be placed at the
bottom of the entire list, and he will
have to wait until the men before him
obtain their uniforms. The shoes will
be given out later.
Not Officers' Uniforms
"The cadets should not expect an
officer's uniform," stated Secretary
Shirley Smith yesterday afternoon,
"for the way prices are you can't get
a serge uniform with cap, shoes and
leggins for $24. The suits on hand
are serviceable, however, and are up
to the specifications of the contract.
We at first contracted for all wool
cloth, but the government command-
eered the supply and we had to con-
tent ourselves with a wool mixture.
The shoes are very good-in fact
thle sample being the best army shoe
I have ever seen."
Detailed information about the is-
sue will be posted on the regular R.
0, T. C. bulletin boards.
CONGRESS TO ACT
ON WAR EFFICIENCY
Washington, Feb. 12-Controv'ersy
over American war efficiency and re-
organization promises soon to reach
concrete form for action in congress.
The senate military committee's in-
quiry was virtually concluded today
with submission by Secretary Baker of
confidential information regarding
shipping facilities. About the same
time it became known that President
Wilson, unalterably opposed to the
committee's bill for a war council and
a munitions director, plans to begin
tomorrow a series of conferences with
members of congress, calling them to
the White House to discuss legislation
giving him powers to effect such re-
organization as he desires. The bill
the president had introduced last
week probably will be amended by
the judiciary committee and soon
brought before the senate.
Secretary Baker according to .-com-
mittee members submitted complete
information regarding available Am-
erican tonnage and prospects of secur-
ing allied tonnage for transportation
and supply of American forces sent
abroad.
DONALD A. SMITH, EX-'17E, IS
RESCUED FROM TUSCANIA

Lieut. Donald A. Smith, ex-'17E, was
rescued from the torpedoed liner, Tus-
cania, after three hours in the water,
according to a cablegram received by
the Acacia fraternity this week.
Lieutenant Smith was a member of
the Acacia, Sigma Delta Chi, Tau Betaj
Phi, and Phi Alpha Tau fraternities
while attending the University. He
was also a member of the Board in
Control of Student Publications last
year, managing editor of the Michigan"
Technic, a member of the Glee club,
and class president in 1916.
Prof. Hollister Completes New Book
R. D. T. Hollister, acting head of
the oratory department, has just com-
pleted and published a book entitled
"Speech Making," which will be used
in two or three courses in the Uni-
versity. This is one of the first books
gotten out by the oratory departmentj

Those Eligible for Engineering Re-
serve Must Have Average Record
of Recent Graduates
BAKER PROVIDES TRANSFER
OF ENLISTED MEN TO COLLEGE
Aim is to Increase Number Tech-
nically Trained in Country by
Completing Education
More than 200 men in the colleges
of Engineering, Architecture and
Chemistry in the University have made
application for enlistment in the eng-
ineer rbserve corps to which students
of high scholarship are eligible. The
men now being examined by the Uni-
versity health department under Major
R. Peterson. If the men succeed in
passing the physical examinations
they will go to Detroit where they
will be sworn in the service.
Dean William H. Butts of the Col-
lege of Engineering, Prof. L. A. Hop-
kins of the naval achitecture and
marine engineering departments, and
the heads of the various departments
in the College of Engineering were
chosen by the enginering faculty to
pass on scholarship of the applicants.
To be eligible the applicant must have
made a record equalling that among
the graduates of the last ten years,
whose scholarship has been among
the highest one-third of their classes.
After their enlistment in Detroit they
will be detailed to the University to
complete their course.
-War Department Grants Concessions
"The secretary of war has directed
that enlisted men of the army now in
active service, who entered the ser-
vice by voluntary enlistment or draft
after Sept. 1, and who were eligible
at the time of enlistment or induction
into military service, under the regu-
lations governing enlistment by en-
gineering students in the engieer en-
gineer branch of the enlisted reserve
corps, be transferred to the engineer
enlisted reserve corps, upon approval
by the chief of engineers, for the pur-
pose of completing course in approved
technical schools," stated a letter re-
cently received by President Harry B.
Hutchins from the war department at
Washington.
ington.
Transfer Expense Born by Students
-"The expense of the transfer must
be borne by the soldier and theappli-
cation for a transfer by a soldier with-
out the boundaries of the United
States, will not be entertained save
under exceptional circumstances.
"The transfer, if approved, will be
arranged to take effect in each indi-
vidual case at such time as to give the
United States the use of the men's
services and the individual the bene-
fit of miitary training up to date at
which he can resume his studies, at
and about the point at which they
were interrupted by his enlistment or
induction'into the military service."
Each candidate for transfer must
submit an application in duplicate and
made out in its entirety in his own
handwriting, according to the advices
from the war department. Each ap-
plication must also be accompanied
by a certificate from the president or
dean, carrying the seal of the insti-
tution and made under oath before
a notary public or other civil offieer
authorized to administer oaths.
LIEUT. A. N. THALL, TUSCANIA
VICTIM, REPORTED RESCUED
Word has been.received that Lieu-
tenant George A. N. Thall, a former
student of engineering at the Univer-
sity, has been reported as escaped
from the torpedoed Tuscania and hav-
ing landed safely in Ireland. Lieuten-
ant Thall is a member of the one

hundred and eighth United States en-
gineers, and received his commission
in Los Angeles, Cal.
Lieutenant Thall's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. S. W. Thall of Alpena, Mich.,
were not aware that their son had
sailed on the Tuscania until they were
informed of his rescue by Lieutenant
Thall's wife.
Committee Endorses Woman Suffrage
St. Louis, Feb. 12-The Republican
nation'al committee after pastponing
until .tomorrow the selection of a
chairman toiay adapted a resolution
endorsing the vote of Republican con-
gressmen for a womans suffrage

MEN IN SERVICE
MAY ENTER SCHOOL

E. T. WHITE, '08
GETS COMMISSION
Will Probably Continue in Charge of
Ordnance Courses in
Ann Arbor.
E. T. White, '08, acting head of the
ordnance course, has been commis-
stoned a captain in ordnance, accord-
ing to Washington dispatches yester-
day.
Captain White has been in charge
of all local ordnance work since the
departure of Major J. A. Bursley to
Washington last week. Major Burs-
ley is to assume the superintendency
of the training of all men going into
ordnance work.
Captain White has as yet to receive
official notification of his commission.
Though nothing definite is known as to
where he will be assigned, it is sup-
posed that he will remain in charge
of the ordnance courses here. He has
been connected with the army stores
coura since last summer.
PROF WR TO TALK ON
-MAKING A NEW WORL"

UNIVERSITY
A BUTO COMBI

_

SERIES OF FIVE LECTURES TO
GIVEN IN ANN ARBOR
CHURCHES

BE I barely removed from the

MEN WORK OVI
EXCESS 1

MATERIAL DA MA(
NOT TO RANGE
City's Sewers Prove Unequal
al Situation; System N
Attention
Ann Arbor and the Univers
ed their attention from a bat
King Winter yesterday to com
the watery elements which wE
ened by a sudden thaw.
University hospital sufferE
siderably from excess water,
leaks troubling both the X-re
in Palmer ward and the sto
Plates valued at $400 to $5

Prof. Harry Ward of the Boston Un-
iversity School of Theology, will give a
series of five lectures on "Making a New
World," beginning Saturday, Feb: 16,
at the Congregational, Methodist, and
Baptist churches. Professor Ward is
an active social worker of national
repute being on a number of commit-
tees 'for social service and editor of
two social service bulletins.
Besides giving his series of lectures
Professor Ward will speak at a few of
the University students' twenty-min-
ute Lenten services. The five lectures
will be as follows:
1. "The Need for a New World"-
7:30 o'clock Saturday evening, Feb.
16, at the Methodist church.
2. "The Cry of the Children"-12
o'clock, Sunday noon, Feb. 17, at the
Baptist church.
3. "The Voice of Labor" - 7:30
o'clock, Sunday evening, Feb. 17, at
the Methodist church.
4. "Making Money or People"-7
o'clock, Monday evening, Feb. 18, at
the Congregational church.
5. "Masters or Servants"-7 o'clock
Tuesday evening, Feb. 19, at the Con-
gregational church.
COLONEL A. C. PACK FAILS TO
PASS FINAL EXAMINATION
Pleads Own Case in Washington; May
Still Have Chance for
Overseas Duty.
After passing three rigid physical
.examinations Colonel A. C. Pack of
this city, formerly one of the One
Hundred and Twenty-fifth Infantry,
was held up on a fourth just as h'was
ready to embark for somewhere in
Europe. The first of the examinations
was given July 15.
When a report had been made on the
final examination Colonel Pack ap-
pealed to General Hahn for permission
to plead his case in Washington. This
permission was granted sand three
days were spent in the capitol city
the Colonel trying first to secure per-
mission to go overseas and later to
remain in service in the states. Both
requests were refused.
If the war lasts long enough Colonel
Pack feels that the less exacting phy-
sical examination will be given field
officers and that he still may get an
opportunity to do that which he sold
his business and gave up other pro-
spects in the commercial world to do.
He still has hopes of going across the
seas in the service of Uncle Sam.
In regard to the future, Colonel
Pack stated that he had no plans.
MILLING COMPANY MUST FILL-
GOVERNMENT ORDERS ONLY
Orders have ben received by the
Michigan Milling company to sell no
more flour at retail or wholesale until
the government orders held by that
concern are filled. Many bakers of the
city have been depending upon the loc-
al- concern for flour since they have
not been able to obtain it from out-
side, and they may be compelled to
close their shops until. the order is
lifted. It is thought that the mill
will be able to take local orders with-

in time to avoid being made
less and a force of men spent
mainder of the day in clearing i
leak which threatened the stor
was stopped before much dama
done.
Phone Service Damaged
The east foyer of Hill audi
was filled with water admitte
crack in one of the roof plat
this was fixed immediately, a
damage resulted. All day ye:
and long into the night a larg
of men was at work on the c
removing snow, and opening up
age ditches where the water h
lected.
Probably the greatest financia
age in the city was caused by th
er backing up into a telephot
duit on Washtenaw avenue b
Oxford and Cambridge roads.
hundred telephones were put
commission, and there will bE
trouble in repairing these line
Coal Yards Flooded
The intersection of Ashley
and the Ann Arbor railroad w
scene of the main trouble in t
Backed up water from culve
West Madison, West Jefferso
Hill streets, and the culvert or
avenue with an extension r
near~Weinberg's Coliseum, ti
with the water from Allen's
caused the coal yards of Will
Rhode, and Heck and Son to b<
ed to the depth of two feet.
covered the floor of the Ann
station during the day, but I
ceded last night.
Streams of water flowing
Granger avenue inundated the
part o. fthe pavement on I
street, near Woodlawn avenue.
the water attained a depth of
A frozen storm sewer on West
street caused water to rise to
ilar height near the Ann Arbc
road tracks.
iater From Hills Floods Cel
Water coming from the hills
Palmer field flooded the cellar
number of homes on Fou
street.
Indications seem to point to I
that the water conditions we
tirely local, as none of the ra
running through the city repo
train trouble.
City Engineer Manley Osgoc
last night that there had been
terial losses in the city, but tl
situation showed clearly tha
storm sewer system needed at
badly.
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
MAY CONSIDER WEIGH
OF HIS OWN EVI]

nt Harry B. Hutchins has
pointed by Gov. Albert E.
as a member of the Junior
s advisory committee for the
Vlichigan. Other members on
nittee are Hon. F. L. Keeler,
chairman; Mark McKee, De-
retary; Bishop E. D. Kelly,
or; Rev. A. P. Sater, Bay
esident Charles McKinney,
Normal college; J. H. B.
,rquette; Charles E. Chadsey,
Fr. L. P. Krakowski, Bay
I President Frank S. Kedzie
ichigan Agricultural college.
SENFELDER RESIGNS
POST AS DAILY CRITIC
oard of Control of Student
ons at its last meeting ac-
e resignation of Mr. John A.
der of the rhetoric depart-
critic of The Daily. Mr. Mos-
has elected the ordnance
id has therefore been forced
p his work as critic because
L of time. Prof. F. N. Scott,
of the board has been au-
to appoint his successor.

*
*
*

NEW COURSE IN FOODS IS
PROPOSED FOR WOMEN
There will be an inportant
meeting of all junior and senior
women of the University ,at 4
o'clock today in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall for the purpose of out-
lining the war course in foods. All
upperclass women are required to
be present.
(Signed) MISS AGNES E. WELLS,
Acting Dean of Women.'
* * * * * * * * * * *

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The new course in foods proposed
for the Michigan women has been ad-
vocated with the support of President
Hutchins as an invaluable war meas-
ure for all University women by Food
Administrator Hoover. At a meet
of the upperclass women at 4 o'clock
today in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
Miss Agnes E. Wells will outline the
course and give reasons for its adop-
tion.
If sufficient interest is shown in this
work, three and perhaps four hours
credit will be given for it in the Un-
iversity and it may be taken as extra
hours as in the case of the military

County Prosecuting
A. Lehman, charged by
of being present at th
Seventh street on the
2, may have to decide I
there is enough eviden
complaint to warrant
Doty to issue a warran
has refused to issue a
case. It is said that I

as an-I
V. the

sirE
ly

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