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February 12, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-12

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THE WEATHER
SOMEWHAT COLDER
TODAY

A6P
.4AAtr t an

~IaiAjF

ASSOCIATED I
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXVIII. No. 89. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12. 1918. PRICE THREE CENT

SYSTEMATIZED
FOR SEMESTER
EIGHT SERGEANTS DEMOTED FOR
ORGANIZED DISOBEDIENCE
IN SERVICE
U. S. SENDS RETIRED
MEN TO TRAIN CADETS

Add New Course
In Naval Science

Companies Will Form in Front of
Auditorium Thursday For
First Drill

Hill

Complete re-organization of the mil
itary regiments by the headquarter
company, the demoting of eight Firs
sergeants to the ranks of privates, th
installation of two U. S. retired Firs
Sergeants by the war department, an
the depositing of $25,200 by the Uni
versity to the acting quartermaster t
pay for the uniforms, were a few o
the many events that occurred in the
R. 0. T. C. during the past two weeks
During the period of examinations
the headquarters company re-organiz.
ed the two regiments. All transfers
were carefully considered and a ma-
jority of the requests were accepted
Typevritten lists showing the per-
sonnel will be posted on the office
R. 0. T. C. bulletin board Wednesday
First Drill Thursday
The first drill of the semester will
be held at 4 o'clock Thursday after-
noon, after the formation of compa-
nies in front of Hill auditorium. Lieut.
George C. Mullen requests all cadets
to locate the new assigned positions in
the re-organized companies and re-
port for duty in the new companies at
the first drill. "No information con-
cerning the assignment of cadets to
new companies will be given out over
the telephone," stated Lieutenant Mul-
len last night.
U. S. Sends Army Officers
First Sergeants Charles Meisel, U.
S. A. retired, and James Conley, U. S.
A. retired have been detailed to the
R. 0. T. C. at the University. At the
present time they will assume charge
of all drills with the arms. This will
include all make-up and advanced, as
well as the regular battalion drills.
Advanced and make-up drills will
be held daily from 2 to 3 o'clock and
from 7 to-8 o'clock, excepting Satur-
days and Sundays, according to the
information given out from the mili-
tary office yesterday afternoon. The
drills on Saturdays will be held from
9 to 11 o'clock. The order is effective
after Feb: 12. The headquarters unit
will form for drill at 4:15 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon.
University Deposits Uniform Money
The University has deposited $25,200
to the credit of the acting quartermas-
ter, which will be the first allotment
for the regulaion uniforms purchased
for the cadets last semester. In ad-
dition to this amount the state will
advance $20,000 to be used for the
same purpose. No information re-
gardingthesdistribution of the uni-
forms has been given out by the mil-
itary department.
Eight First Sergeants Demoted
On the grounds of organized insub-
ordination the following eight men
were demoted from the rank of First
(Continued on Page Six)
DAILY SENDS OUT CALL
FOR STAFF TRY-OUTS
The Daily wishes to secure 20 jun-
iors, sophomores, and freshmen to try
out for positions on both the business
and editorial staffs.
Of these 15 are needed for editor-
ial work.
Applicants for business positions
should see Emery between 11 and 12
o'clock Tuesday or Wednesday. Edi-
torial try-outs should see Wilson be-
tween 2 and 3:30 o'clock the same1
days.

Naval science and tactics have been
been added to the curricula of the
University for the second semester.
The -course of instruction will be sim-
ilar to that offered the students in the
military training units but it will be
especially adapted to the requiremens
of men in the navy or those who will
enlist later
Work will be given two hours daily
five days a week, Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, and
two hours' credit will be allowed. The
course is divided into three branches
known as Naval Training Ia, 1b,
and lc. Course la will be instruction
in deck and line duties, 1b in engineer-
ing duties, and 1c in aeronautic duties.
Professors Boak, Bragg, Pawlowski,
and Sadler will give the courses.
Two years will be the time requir-
ed for students to complete the course
of instruction, and those enrolling will
be required to finish the work unless
they leave th A University earlier. The;
class will constitute the Michigan
Naval unit. The work will fit the
men to become ensigns in the navy.
Those enrolling will not have to entr
the navy, nor will they be protected
from the draft. A meeting will beI
held at 7 o'clock tomorrow night at
the Union for students who wish to se
cure additional information. Consult-I
ation with either of the professors will
also be possible.
LIT GRADES TO BE
MAILED TOMORROW
Grades for last semester will be
mailed from the literary college ona
Wednesday. The names are being
handled alphabetically, and will prob-c
ably be mailed in order of their initi-N
als. Most of them should be in theb
mails by Thursday.
The grades are about the same ast
usual although there seems to be at
smaller proportion of A's and E's thanN
in other years. Most of the students,r
of course, are graded B and C, buta
there are far more this year propor-o
tionately than usual. The extraor-
dinary strain of the war is thought toa
be the cause. The faculty has notc
changed its standard of grading.
HARRY COLEMAN, PROMINENT
NEWSPAPER MAN, DIES SUNDAYS
Harry Coleman, managing director
of the Detroit Free Press, and prom-
inent Michigan newspaper man, died0
in Detroit Sunday after a brief illness.-
Mr. Coleman attended the University
from 1893 to 1895 and during his uni-e
versity career was on The Michigano
Daily, holding the position of manag-w
ing editor in 1895.S
After leaving school Mr. Coleman
began work with the Detroit News.n
Then he became owner of the Oakland t
County Post. He finally sold this pa-a
per and returned to Detroit where hed
became managing director of the De- P
troit Journal, and later managing di-
rector of the Detroit Free Press. r
Mr. Coleman leaves a widow andw
hree daughters.
IVE U. OF M. MEN BELIEVED w
TO HAVE BEEN ON TUSCANIA s
t
Five former Michigan men of the
Pwentieth Engineering reginent are
elievod to have been on the transport
uscania sunk by a German submar-
ne last Thursday night.
Authentic information has been re- o
eived certifying that Philip Alden, p
x-'18, and C. Andrews, ex-'18, were on u
oard. It is not known definitely as t
o whether H. W. Graham, '17, S. R.
Wusperger, '17, and L. C. Bacon, ex- i

19, were on this ship, but it is re- s
orted that their respective companies a

Sergt. Carl F. Young Appointed
Teach Here Proper
Accountability

to

Armies May
Unless

BUASLY TO HEAD
ORDNANCE WORK
Organizer of Michigan Course to have
Supervision of Work
Throughout U. S.
150 MEN PICKED FOR NEW
COURSE TO START FEB. 23

RUSS DEMOBILIZE
FIGSHTING FORGES
No Formal Treaty Signed with Central
Powers; Wilson Says U. M, Will
Stick to End of War
DESERTED ROUMAN IA N OW
FACES CRITICAL SITUATION

Major J. A. Bursley, organizer of the
school here in ordnance work, and in
charge of the five courses already suc-
cessfully completed, has been called
by the government to Washington to
assume control of all training of men
for ordnance work. He will have the
superintendence of the'schools in the
various universities of the land, and
in private industrial plants, besides
direct control of a school in Wash-
ington for training clerks, typists, and
stenographers for use in the ordnance
department. E. T. White, '08, a mem-
ber of the ordnance school faculty, is
acting as head of the local course un-
til a successor to Major Bursley is ap-
pointed.
The present class graduates Satur-F
day, and the men will be released1
without any ceremony whatsoever andi
be free until the following Thursday
when they are due back here. It isi
thought they will be entrained in at
body and sent to a southern point.f
The next course starts February 23,1
and the 150 men picked from the 400e
or more applicants, have been notifiedf
of their success. A different method
will be used in handling them than
has been used heretofore. It is plan-I
ned to induct them into service9
through their local boards, and router
them to a supply depot where theyI
will be completely equipped beforet
reporting here. Their schedule on and
after reporting will be similar to thatI
observed by the class now graduating.r
Ordnance Sergeant Carl F. Young,
a graduate of the University of Wis-t
consin, has been appointed as instruc-s
tor here to teach a course in Proper
Accountability.e
SMILEAGE BOOK COMMITTEE e
WORKS FOR QUOTA THIS WEEKb
Prof. E. H. Kraus, general chairman
of the Ann Arbor committee for the
sale of Smileage books declared yes-
terday that the campaign will be push-
ed to the utmost for the remainder
of the week. It is the aim of thec
workers to reach the $1,000 quota bye
Saturday.F
"There is a personal touch in con- F
nection with this kind of giving whichs
he Red Cross and other forms of don-s
ations lack as the books can be sentv
directly to friends in service," said 1
Professor Krauss.
The work here in this city has beenA
retarded by the inclemency of the '
weather and by examinations.
The sale on the campus is under the F
direction of a committee of students h
who have placed them in the banks, s
everal of the business places, and in D
he registrar's office. I
ILLNESS OF COL. ROOSEVELT G
POSTPONES DETROIT MEETING
a
Because of the unexpected illnessw
f Col. Theodore Roosevelt, the Navyg
arade and meeting which was sched-
iled for Friday, February 15, in De-
roit, has been postponed for the time. i
Col. Roosevelt was to have spoken
n behalf of the Navy Recruiting, and
tudents of the University had been
sked to join with 1,500 societies in s
,eceiving him. It is hoped that with s
mn improvement in health the Colonela
nay appear at a date from three to r
ix weeks later than the one sched- 9.

Feb. 11. - Almost simultaneously
with the announcement by the Bolshe-
vik government that Russia is out of
the war and that a general demobliza-
tion along the entire Russian front is
to be carried out, thus permitting the
Teutonic allies to withdraw all their
forces on other battle fronts, President
Wilson has restated to a joint session
of congress the fact that the United
States is in the war to stay until those
principles which the people regard as
fundamental to a permanent peace are
obtained.
No Formal Treaty
Although no formal treaty has yet
been signed between the Russians and
the central powers, the Bolshevik
government has ordered a cessation of
hostilities by the Russians against
Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey,
and Bulgaria and the withdrawal of its
troops from the Baltic sea to the Rou-
manian frontier. It had long been
foreseen that such an outcome event-
ually would follow upon the revolu-
tionary movement in Russia, where,
for nearly a year, civil strife and war
weariness generally, proved most pot-
ent factors in weakening the battle
fronts.
Roumanian Situation Critical
Peace having been effected by the
Russians and the Ukrainians with the
Teutonic allies, the situation of Rou-
mania becomes a most critical one.
Entirely cut off now from her allies,
the Roumanians apparently are faced
with the absolute necessity of effect-
ing a separate peace or being over-
run by superior enemy armies.
On the various battle fronts, except
that in northern Italy, operations by
small patrols and artillery duels are
in progress. On the Italian front
enemy forces have heavily bombarded
Italian positions and delivered infant-
ry attacks. In all the attacks the
enemy was repulsed by the Italian
batteries.
17 LITS GET A'S
LAST SEMESTER
Seventeen students in the literary
college earned all A grades last sem-
ester, according to the report made by
Registrar Arthur G. Hail yesterday.
Five were seniors, two juniors, four
sophomores, five freshmen, and one
special. Eleven were men and six
were women students. The list fol-
ows:
James P. Adams, '19, Mary L.
Alexander, '18, Margaret I. Anschutz,
19, Frances Broene, '18, Fred B. Fead,
20, William L. Fink, '21, Joseph
Freedman, '21, Burton A. Garling-
house, '20, Keet W. Halbert, '20, Rus-
sell Hussey, '18, Albert C. Jacobs, '21,
Dorothy Jacobson, spec., Marian Kling-t
er, '18, James Landis, '21, L. N. Oster-
man, '20, Evangeline Parker, '21, Rossc
G. Walker '18.E
This list upsets all previous recordsa
n the change of proportion of men i
and women. Women students have al-a
ways had a higher proportion of A
rades than have the men, but thes
ondition is reversed this year.r
Grades have not been catalogued yeta
n the other colleges.c
Four Soldiers Killed Last Week i
Washington, Feb. 11.-General Per- a
hing today reported four American t
oldiers killed, one severely woundeda
and five slightly wounded and threec
missing in the actions of Feb. 7, 8, and(
Among the men killed was Corp.(
eorge H. Allie of Detroit, Mich.

Overrun Tiny Country
Separate Peace Is
Signed

BERT ST. JOHN,
DIRECTOR OF 1918 OPERA
OPERADIECORTAKES
H BERT ST. JOHN ARRIVES IN ANN
ARBOR TO CONDUCT 1918
UNION PRODUCTION
Bert St. John, director of this year's
Union opera, arrived in Ann Arbor
last night to take charge of rehearsals
and the actual production of "Let's
Go." He has been working under
Klaw and Erlanger as manager of the
Western Pollyanna company.
Mr. St. John expressed himself as
being satisfied with the progress of
the tryouts and rehearsals, and stated
that the outlook for the opera was
very promising. He has directed five
previous Union operas, "Koanzaland,"
"Crimson Chest," "Awakened hame-
ses," anid "Contrarie Mary,' and "A
Model Daughter."
The date of the next rehearsal has
not been decided, but men contesting
for places in the cast and chorus are
asked to watch The Daily and the Un-
ion bulletin board for further an-
nouncements. In the event that Mr.
St. John finds it possible to hold a
rehearsal tonight, a notice to that ef-
fect will be posted on the bulletin.
The time and place for the next wo-
men's rehearsal will be announced
later.
Rehearsals Held Saturday
Men's rehearsals were held aStur-
day afternoon at the Union, at which
time a partial synopsis of the opera
was read to those present. A number
of men who are still eligible for the
cast and chorus could not be reached,
a situation which probably accounts
for the fact that still more were not
on hand.
GENERAL LITTELL DEFENDS
"COST PLUS PROFIT" PLAN
Declares System Saved Money for
Government and Speeded
Work
Washington, Feb. 11.-The much at-
tacked "cost plus profit" system un-
der which contracts for the national
cantonments were built, was defend-
ed today by Brig. Gen. Littell and his1
aides who directed the work, in test-
ifying in the final branch of the sn-E
ate military committee's war inquiry.
General Littell declared the plan had
saved the government money, had
not given contractors excessive fees
and had speeded completion of thed
camps.
In detailing the work accomplished
in preparing quarters for the war
army, General Littell said the 16 can-i
tonments had cost $143,000,000, the1
average fee of contractors of each
camp was from two to three per cent.i
Competitive bids were impossible, the
General said, because of the speed re-t
quired.

U. S STUNCH TO'
IDEALS INWA
PRESIDENT CLEARS ATMOSPHERE
FROM CONFUSION OF HUN
PEACE SPEECHES
SPEECH ACCEPTED AS
NOTICE TO ALLIES
Shows World Diplomacy- Now Works
In Open Forun Instead Of
In Secret
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 11. - President
Wilson addressed congress today to
clear the atmosphere of any confusion
resulting from the recent speeches on
terms by the German chancellor and
the Austro-Hungarian foreign minis-
ter and to reiterate that until the mil-
itary masters of Germany are ready to
consider peace and principles of jus-
tice the United States will continue
the fight it is just beginning, for the
safety of itself and mankind.
In the speech of the German chan-
cellor the President found no ap-
proach to the path of peace but rather
a proposal to end the war on German
terms and to set up a league of na-
tions to maintain the balance of pow-
er so established. Count Czernn, the
Austrian spokesman, the President
said, employed a very friendly tone
and seemed to see the fundamental
elements of peace with clear eyes and
probably would have gone much far-
ther if it had not 'been for Austria's
alliances and her dependence upon
Germany.
U. S. Is Staunch
Members of congress accepted the
address not as a peace message but as
a notice to the central powers that the
United States cannot be turned aside
from the object for which it is fighting
and a warning to congress and the
American people that the task of
sending the nation's fighting men to
the front must not be interfered with
by equivocal and misleading utter-
ances of Teutonic statesmen.
While in official and diplomatic
quarters today there was a disposi-
tion to let the president's address
speak for itself without interpretation,
there apparently was no division on
the point that his prime object was to
bring the "extra official negotiations"
as some observers have termed the
speechmaking of the chief statesmen
of the nations at war but to the
fundamental issues, the settlement of
each question and principles of jus-
tice; the cessation of the barter of
provinces and peoples; the settlement
of territorial question for the benefit
of the populations concerned :and fin-
ally the recognition of national aspira-
tion as a basis of permanent peace.
To Remind Reichstag
Another purpose served it was
pointed out is to remind the German
Reichstag of the great distance that
the German chancellor has traveled
from its resolutions of last July re-
garding self-determination of the
rights of small nations and peoples,
no annexation, contribution or puni-
tive damages. Responsive echoes
among the German socialists and lib-
erals, may in the end bring pressure
to bear upon the war lord who is at
present controlling the fate of Ger-

many.
"We cannot have general peace for
the asking, or by the mere arrange-
ments of a peace conference," Mr.
Wilson said. "It cannot. be pieced to-
gether out of individual understand-
ings between powerful states. All the
parties to this war must join in the
settlement of every issue anywhere
involved in it because what we are
asking is a peace that we can all unite
to guarantee and maintain and every
(Continued on Page Six)

were on it.
E. E. Pardon, ex-'18, was at first re-
ported to have left on the Tuscania,
but it has been ascertained that he is
still in this country.

uled.

luired.

U

U °

-

Wednesday

February
20th

Glee & andolin Club Concert
80 Live Musicians
Hill Auditorium 8:15 P. M.. Eastern Time

I

35c

includingVW

.r

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