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January 24, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*
*

IL TOUCHES

T

*
*
*
*
*

TODAY

"Oh, Boy,",at the Garrick, week *
of Jan. 28. *
_______

Anna Held in "Follow Me," at'
the Whitney, Tuesday, Jan. 29.

TODAY

lam Duncan and
in "The Tender-

"
"
t

* Wuerth-Pauline Stark in "Un-
1 til They Get ,Me." Also Comedy,
* "A Birthday Number."
* Arcade-Mae Marsh in "The Cin-
* 1erella Man." Also Christie Com-
* edy. "Green Eyes and Bullets."

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION PLAY
WILL BE PRESENTED FRI-
DAY NIGHT
With but one day in which to put
the finishing touches to the Oratorical
association play, John Masefield's
"The Tragedy of Nan," members of the
cast are sparing neither days nor
nights in their efforts to make the
production equal to, if not superior,
to its predecessors, when it is pre-
sented at 8 o'clock tomorrow night in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Dress rehearsals began last night.
The tickets, which have been placed
on sale at Wahr's bookstore, are re-
ported to be having a fast sale. Since
there are only about 570 seats, those
expecting to attend are urged to se-
cure their tickets early.
The committees for the play are as
follows:
Costumes: Warren H. Townsend,
'18, and La Vern Ross, grad.; Furni-
ture and Properties: Wilfred Nevue,
'18,, and June Brooks, '18; Tickets:
John C. Cary, '19; Programs: Carl
Dahlstrom, '19, and Publicity; Eugene
Given, '19.
Hugh Cameron, James Bradbury, Le-
nore ChiVpendale, Lillian Brennard,
Henry Dornton, and forty others.

(Closed Tuesdays by order of U. S.
Fuel Administrator)
Shown at 3. 7 and 8:30 Eastern Time
x5c Unless Otherwise Specified.
'Thurs-Fri-24-25-Mae Marsh in "The
Cinderella Man" and ChristieCon-
edy, "Green Eyes and Bullets."
Sat-25-Normnan Talmadge he i
Maoth" and Charlie Chaplin in "The
Adventurer" (ret.) 20c.

1

IWHITN I

I.

I

night

A
WIT

SICAL COMED
L SCENERY
EFFECTS

ae-Emily Stevens in "The *
:ker." *
s * * * *.. *a "*s*"*

NEW SONG HIT

CLEVE

BEAUTY CH

PRICES

AT~ THE WITNEY.

.~ ~ .4

The press agent promises Ann Ar-
bor theater goers a chance to witness
"the most beautiful musical comedy
ever prioduced," when Anna Held
comes' to the Whitney on next Tues-
day night, Jan. 29, in her own pro-
duction of "Follow Me."
The popular actress is playing a
role, With a world of opportunity for
her, the depiction of the charming
actress Who is folleWed by men and
W omen alike. -Miss Held is in abso-
lute charge of the piece and it is said
that she planned All of the seenre her-
self, and 90ent hours designing and
directing the construction of the many
beautiful gbwns Wbn .by h-erself and
the other women in the company. She
is also given credit for the idea about
which ,the Whole show is built and has
directed the piece from the beginning.
AT THIE GAMUCK
"Oh, Boy," heralded as the biggest
hit' seen in New York for 25 years,
will come to the Garrick theater :for
the week beginning Jan. 28, from a
run of over six months at the La Salle
theater in Chicago. The company is
headed by Joseph Santley, who plays
the part of George Budd, the poor
bridegroom who has to desert his
bride on their wedding night. Never
before has Mr. Santley had such a
splendid opportunity for the display
of his versatility, and the Chicago
critics were unanimous in their opin-
ion that "Oh, Boy" was the best thing
that Mr. Santley has ever done.
Supporting him are Ivy Sawyer,
Dorothy Maynard, Laurance Whbat,

T

AT THE MAJESTIC

"The Tenderfoot," the big feature
picture that will be shown at the Ma-
jestic today, is the second of the fam-
ous Wolfville stories, by Alfred Lewis,
to be picturized by the Vitagraph. The
cast is composed of William Duncan,
Carol Holloway, Florence Dye, Walter
I4. Rogers, Joe Ryan, Charles Wheel-
ock, Hattie Buskirk, and Fred Forres-
ter.
The stars in this piece started "The
Fighting Trail," the new adventure
serial, which this same company is
staging at the Pantages theater in
Los Angeles, the other night, by each
making a speech to the crowded
house.
AT THE ARCADE
Mae Marsh in "The Cinderella Man"
is the attraction at the Arcade today
and tomorrow. Judging from the un-
amity of opinion of screen critics,
this feature is likely to be as well re-
ceived here as it has been in other
cities. Mae Marsh will be remembered.
for her work in the "Birth of a Na-
tion." "The Cinderella Man" has an
attractive story, and the stars are
well supported.

ONE NIGHT '
ONLY .

Choicest Dish on

The Only

Pride of- Paris and France's Choice
Stage in Her Gorgeously Bewildering
sation, Direct from the Casino Theatre
"1Fol low
Company of Fifty, Including Lead
Harry hort, Venita Fitzhugh, Man
hugh, ew and Harry Seymour, Le
Ward. That Stunning ANNA H
Women, Surpassing the Nymphs of P
Lavish, Loviness,
A Fortune in ANNA HELD
Fashions; Quality; Quantity; Melody
American Wit; Bizarre Costumes; L
torial Splendor and Scenic Grandeur.
SEAT SALE SATURDA'
Most of Choicest Down Sta

t go South
id but two
The real
trip North

You will find what you want
through .the Daily want ads.-AdV.

1

-AdT.'

110

The

inderea

THIS IS A PHOTOPLAY THAT
GUAGE ISN'T EQUAL TO THE

IS HARD TO ADVERTISE-BECAUSE
EMERGENCY!

THE ENGLISH

GUNNING, THE NOTED INDEPENDENT SCREEN CRIT-
ROBABLY SUMMED UP THE SITUATION IN HIS UNIQUE
T'ER THAN ANY O' THE CRITICS,-AND ALL OF THEM
BEST THINGS THEY KNOW HOW TO SAY ABOUT THIS
HERE'S WHAT HE SAYS TO EXHIBITORS-READ
)RD OF IT:
CTOR-George LoMe Tucker. s
)R-Edward Childs Carpenter.
WHOLE-One of raost delightful developments 'of lovable
I have ever seen; gill be big winner.
--lender thread smothered by character touches which

The story is that fine old favorite of the wealthy gi
poor poet and told him she was her own companion
covered that he didn't like wealthy peple. Of course th
clutch.
Now, wouldn't you say that that's about as hopeless
one was ever handed with which to make screen entert
present day? Well, just beat it and look this over and d
real director can do when he writes continuity that is
develops his plot in proper sequences to hold the in
twists and human moments.
I want to recommend this production to every s
tinuity as one of the best developed productions on th
have seen in a long, long time. Considering the scant n
plot ideas go, I think that this can serve as a real mod
ambitious writer. Of course the average fan isn't worr
construction, but, believe me-the average fan is going t
Tom Moore, the leading man, has done some beauti
past few years, but I have never seen Tom to better adv
this.. His treatment of the scenes where he discovers
presents, his mannish acceptance of iMss Marsh's atte
derful little bit where he and Miss Marsh rehearse a l
in fact, almost every bit which he registered all thru
not pnly ring true but sort of reach inside of you and to
George Fawcett, as the father of Miss Marsh, was
one of those types very much absorbed in business,
gradually won over by his daughter, and he certainly p
fully. If the scene where Miss Marsh gets a pup for
then allows this pup to tear up a check which her mel
presented to her doesn't get over with your fans, the
walk around and inquire as to who passed the, chlor
there were so many wonderful touches that I can't begi
them here.
I don't get wild-eyed about a film very often, and
I've rarely epjoyed anything as thoroughly as I did this

Arcade

Theatre

SHOWS AT 3:00, 7:00 and 8:30 EASTERN
FIFTEEN CENTS

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