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January 24, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r Sir i xau &d1~lll

A

- 1ii[

DAY A D NIG
SEE VIC

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, IHURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1918. PRI(

t

I

UUL
IN ES

OF

Citizens CutAnd
Haul Firewood
Prominent citizens of Ann Arbor
are to carry out a regular woodcutting
enterprise in going out each week to
a tract of woods which was laid low
recently by a cyclone, and bringing
the wood to the city in an effort to
relieve in part the local fuel situa-
tion. It is estimated that there are
3:bout 1,100 cords of wood to be cut.
The plan was first started by a num-
ber of city Y. M. C. A. men who went
out to the woods Monday.
County Fuel Administrator Junius
E. Beal, has appointed a committee
which will have charge of the work.
The committee is planning parties
which will leave at 8 o'clock Monday
mornings from the city hall to cut and
bring the wood to the city. Practical-
ly every man in the city has a holiday
on Mondays now and everyone is in-

AL;

....-

of FuelI

23.-An official
ight except food,
practically was in

'upv vited to join these companies
mal wood either for themselves
needy families.

and get
or for

<- L M1

.d formally
roads other
freight to-
l avs

aeral
past
was

cturing plants,
rom the stream
essential indus-
or prepared to
r a day or two

Zone System
>ad mileage in haul-
rt of zone system of
probably will be put
the railroad and fuel
ithin a week.
ange not far from the
uch of the country to-
weather is due later
when it comes rail-
:'for much improve-
ation.
Pleased
Gargoyle

thout an exception, the Mid-
her of the Gargoyle, which
rn the campus yesterday,
the best issue of the year.
to those in control of the
blication's destiny, there
ver, several adverse criti-
-hese are said to have pro-
the "amateur humorists"
ributions were featured on
age. Much of the chagrin
ted, since no names were
be various bits of humor
rings were slightly better
ual high standard and ex-
iriety of styles. The clean-
f Robertson's double-page,
Junior Hon as it Would

INSTRUCTION CAMP FOR
ARILLERY MEN OPENED
PRESIDENT HARRY B. HUTCHINS
NOTIFIED BY WAR DE-
PARTMENT
Fort Monroe, Va., has opened a
training camp for officers of the coast
artillery that will continue for'the
duration of the war, according to a
communication received by President
Harry B. Hutchins from the war de-
partment. The course lasts three
months. The first began early this
month, while others will follow the
first of April, July, and October.
College Graduates Preferred
The coast artillery is charged with
the defense of the harbors of the Unit-
ed States and the insular possessions,
both by guns and submarine mines,
and will also serve in Europe with
the railroad artillery and the heavy
trench mortar batteries. For officers
of this service men of good education
are needed, preferably college gradu-
ates, or those who have completed the
greater part of their college work.
Electrical and mechanical engineers
are especially desired, but technical
education is not a necessity.
Enlist at Recruiting Station
One who desires to enter the coast
artillery, and is not registered for the
draft, should apply for enlistment at
the nearest recruiting station. Reg-
istered men should communicate with
the acting chief of the coast artillery,
Washington, D. C., giving a brief state-
ment of their education. The office,
it satisfied with the qualifications, will
return a letter for presentation to the
local board, authorizing immediate in-
duction into the' army, and an assign-
ment to coast artillery station.
DEBATE TRYOUTS
WILL BE PUBLIC
Final preliminary tryouts for the
Mid-west debate will be held before
the public at 2:30 o'clock Saturday
afternon in room 302 Mason hall.
Eleven tryouts instead of ten an-
mounced yesterday will take part. An-
other man was given permission to try
yesterday.
Illinois notified Michigan yesterday
that the date for the debateMarch 29
came during their spring vacation.
Consequently the debate will probably
be shifted one week earlier or to
March 22.
The University of Wisconsir appears
here and Michigan goes to Urbana.
Which of the Michigan teams, whether
s ffirmative or negative, remains here
bas not been announced.

ON RENCH FRONT
Lessening of Winter Rigors from North
Sea to Swiss Border Permits
Combat to be Resumed
LARGER PART OF AUSTRIANS
REPORTED BACK TO LABOR
Two British Steamers Sunk with Loss
of 718 Lives Announced in
House of Commons
(By Associated Press)
Jan. 23.-With the'reported amelior-
ation of political unrest in Austria-
Hungary and a continuation of silence
as regards the internal situation in
Germany, the notable feature in the
world war is the apparent resumption
on a somewhat larger scale of the mil-
itary operations on the western front
in France and Belgium.
Trying Out Maneuvers
These operations do not transcend
in importance the small activities by
raiding parties which have been in
progress since the severe winter
weather began, though reading be-
tween the lines - of the communica-
tions, it is not difficult to see that the
maneuvers on various sectors are in
the nature of experimenting processes
of a marked character.
From the North Sea to 'the Swiss
frontier the lessening of the rigors'"of
winter has permitted the belligerents
again to send forth their men in en-
terprises which seemingly forecast
the intention to resume fighting activ-
ity more intensively.
On, the front in Italy the change i~
the high command has evidently not.
resulted in any betterment of the
strategic positions of the Austro-Ger-
man armies.
Austrian Situation Acute
The greater part of the striking
workmen in Austria is said to have
returned to work, but the situation
both in Austria and Hungary is de-
tared to be acute owing to the desire
of the people for peace.
Two British steamers were sunk
recently in the Mediterranean sea with
the loss of 718 lives, Iccording to an
announcement made in the house o '
commons.
faculty Players
Satirize Doctors
Moliere's "L'Amour Medecin" to be
given by a cast of faculty members at
the soiree of the Cercle Francais at 8
o'clock Saturday evening in Sarah
Caswell Angell hiall is a satire on
doctors.
The first scene opens with an old
man talking to several of his neigh-
bors about his daughter who is very
sad and apparently ill. He finally con-
sults her and finds out that she is in
love and wants to be married. The old
man, a stingy old fellow, wants. to
keep the dowrie he would have to give
the girl and consequently must keep
her from marrying.
Doctors Take Hand
The girl has taken her maid into her
confidence and they finally hit upon a
plan. The maid informs the father
that his daughter is seriously ill. The
father then calls four doctors.
These men come and the old man
leaves them in consultation. As soon
as he leaves the room they begin talk-
ing about their personal affairs and
not their patient. When the old man
tu, r.s they all tell him what is
the matter, and the scene closes with

a fight between two of them who are
unable to agree.
The dispute is finally settled by the
appetrance of the fifth a young man,
the girl's lover, dressed as a doctor,.
and he declares that the girl has a
mania for marrying and that the only
way to cure her is to humor her. The
father agrees to having a notary come
and a marriage contract is signed be-
tween the young doctor and the girl.

Fuel Lack Hits
Iichigan Plants
Detroit, Jan. 23.--The fuel shortage
in Detroit and Michigan continued
acute today although reports of in-
creased movement of coal to the state
were received;' In Detroit about a
score of sinalI factories were unable
to resume operations today, and the
advisability of closing all or part of
the public schools is being considered
by city officials. One large Detroit fac-
tory exempted from the industrial sus-
pension order was compelled today to
close down orie 'department in order
to continue work on war orders.
A large number of industrial plants
in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Saginaw,
Jackson, and other cities, receiving
most of their power from one com-
pany, remained closed today when the
power company notified them that only
such plants as were engaged on gov-
ernment work could be supplied.
No suffering among domestic con-
sumers was reported from any city to-
night.
SENATE TODISCSS
SENATOR CHAMBERLAIN AIMS TO
ANSWER DENUNCIATION OF
PRESIDENT
Washington, Jan. 23- The c6ntro-
versy between. the administration and
member, of the senate military com-
mittee over proposals for a war cab-
inet and director of munitions will be
brought before the senate tomorrow
with prospects of a spirited discus-
sion.
Senator Chamberlain plans to reply
at length to President Wilson's de-
nunciation of his recent statement
that every department of. the govern-
ment had. broken . down in the war
as a distortion of the truth. Several
speakers on behalf of. the administra-
tion also are planned.
Republicans of the house in con-
ference tonight voted 75 to 19 in favor
of the creation of a department 'or
bureau of munitions and ordnance
with a director appointed by the pres-
ident. There was some discussion of
the war council proposal, but no at-
tempt'was made to put the conference
on record in regard to it.
EXPLOSION ENTOMBS 100
MEN; SEVEN ARE RESCUED
Halifax, Jan. 23.-Nearly 100 men
were entombed by an explosion tonight
in a -shaft of the Acadia Coal. com-
pany's colleries at Stellarton, N. S..
Seven have been brought up alive.
Rescue workers are going into the
shaft and emergency apparatus of all
kinds is being concentrated.
Several hours after the rescue party
entered the shaft none of them had
returned.
hBELGIAN GOVERNMENT REPLIES
TO POPE'S PEACE MESSAGE
Havre, France, Jan. 23.-The Bel-
gian government's terms of peace, set
forth in her reply to Pope Benedict's
peace note, were made public today.
They are in substance, absolute politi-
cal, econom' ic and te'rritor4al inde-
pendance of Belgium.
GERMANS SINK FEW BRITISH
SHIPS DURING PAST WEEK

London, Jan. 23.-Again the sinkings
of British merchantmen by mine or
submarine have been held at a low
point. Only six vessels of 1,600 tons or
over and two under that tonnage were
destroyed in the past week according
to the admiralty report tonight. .
Turkish Solers Are Deserting
During the recent journey from Con-
stantinople to Palestine, 160,000 troops
deserted the Turkish army.

CAMPUS OPINION DIVIDED RESPECT
PACP ATO F WOMEN IN OF
FACLTY- FAVORSWITH RESERVA

ACCIDENT ON U. S. S. CAMDEN
KILLS TWO MICHIGAN BOYS
Washington, Jan. 23.-Two Michi-
gan boys were killed and four other
members of the cruiser U. S. S. Cam-
den were injured In an accident on
board the vessel Monday, according
b reoprts from the navy department
tonight. The dead are: Seaman W. F.
Allen, Port Huron, Mich., and James
E. Davis, of Menominee county.
RED CROSS TO SHIP
SURGICAL SUPPLIES
Two 'hundred and fifty large, paper-
backed absorbent pads, the quota of
Angell house for this month, will be
finished and shipped next week.
The quota assigned eachmonth by
headquarters for the central division
at Chicago, through the Detroit offiee,
forms a largpart of the work. In ad-
dition to this, the output consists of
as many general dressings as possi-
ble. A great many new ones have
been added since the beginning of
the new year.
Less work than usual has been done
during this month, owing, it is be
lieved, . to the fact that the end of the
semester is approaching.
The management hopes soon to in-
terest University women In earning
service crosses to wear on their uni-
forms. . One Red Cross may be worn
on the sleeve pocket of the apron after
3H hours of service. Seventy-two
hours permits the wearing of one on
the coif, and 132 hours gives the privi-
lege of wearing a red ribbon under
the cross on the apron.
In the absence of Mrs. . D. Loree,
the house is being managed by an ex-
ecutive board, appointed by the Red
Cross executive board. Miss Elizabeth
Dean is chairman of the board; and
Mrs. H. J. Goulding, secretary. Mrs.
Evans Holbrook is in charge of the
work rooms, and Mrs. Carrie Burr di-
rects the teaching. The finance com-
mittee consists of Mrs. Henry C. Ad-
ams, Mrs. George W. Patterson, and
Mrs. A. J. Decker. The latter is also
inspector of work.
ORCHESTRA OFFERS
SYMPHONY MUSIC
Under the direction of Mr. Samuel
P. Lockwood, the University Sym-
phony orchestra will make its second
appearance at 4:15 o'clock this after-
noon in Hill auditorium.'
The following numbers are on the
program:
Ballet Music to "Rosamunde," Op.
26....................Schubert
Two Hungarian Dances...........
................... Brahms-Parlow
(Nos. 5 and 6 of the original edition)
Symphony No. 3, A minor,
Op. 56................ Mendelssohn
Introduction and allegro agitato-
Scherzo assai vivace;
Adagio cantabile-
Allegro guerriero and finale meas-
tist.
UNION MID-WINTER BENEFIT
POSTPONED TILL LATER DATE
The mid-winter benefit which was
-to have been given by the Union Feb.
15 has been postponed until such time
as it can be given without inconven-
ience to the men using Waterman
gymnasium. The Union decided to take
this step when it became known that
the entertainment would hinder the

work of Lieutenant Mullen, Dr. May,
and Mr. Farrel, all of whom are using
the gymnasium for classes.. *

Practically all oppositi(
pearance of women in th
igan Union opera, as. ne
be ascertained, is voiced
of the student body, the
the dissenters being me
members with a few exce
ily approve the innovatic
who are not in sympathy'
plan are willing to count
a wartime necessity.
Statements of Prondi
Dean John RE. Efinger:
ly have no objection to
outlined, and I hope it wit
success."
Prof.,Al. M. Wenley: "1
jection to women enterit
from. a stuadpoint of prop
lieve that their doing so
the character of the prod
lug it merely of the natii
ond class musicalhcomed
the enjoyable burlesque
years, which the origini
opera intended it to be."
Registrar Arthur G. Ha
position to use women for
parts in any dramatic or
tertainment given by the
pends entirely on the cha
entertainment. " Thus the
no question as to the
women's taking part in pl
the Comedy club and the I
club, and other organi t
opinion, it would be out
tion to have women' take
traditional Union opera,
been frankly a burlesque
assured that this year's a
serious, and that all its
be such that both women
take part. I am in favor
ing so under the usual
ervison."
Hopes for Friendly
Prof. W.8Em. Humphre
the girls will assume a
tude toward the project
matter will be given d
but at the same time not
for discussion. The ope
is so different in charac
of former years, that w
feminine roles are alme
for its successful produ
alone will tell whether t
will have permanent reE
bring about a closer co-i
tween the men nd won
As forthe men takig gi
lng the chief attraction
it is andvelty which has
large extent.".
Acting Dean Agnes. E
consider it 'manlyun tb
wartime measure, and
heartily approve of it, a
that the. girls will lend t
ation to make the ventur
George Hurley, Presid
igan Union.: "In the fir
der to exist financially,
Union must depend heavil
ion opera. The income f
ship fees and other source
quate and therefore the
ceeds are vital to the U
ence.
"It follows therefore th
must be a paying propo
be so it must be a good i

NOTORIES OF UNIV
VARYING VIEW,
TER

MEN LAR
ACTION (

Many Regret
Agree if

Necessity a
War Makes
perative

ere Adopted," seems
- the artist's humor.
ght is greatly exag-
vertheless consider-
nay be but a forecast
pect of certain forms
ity, should the war

Coal Crisis Preconceived
our humorists often are wiser
ey know, is proved by the dra-
skit, "Pity the Poor Stude,"
shows the workings of the Ann
landladies' union. The piece
iginally conceived for the first
r of the year, but for reasons
to the staff did not appear un-
present issue. Thus in the
f the recent acts of the fuel ad-,
ation, Mrs. Grau-Cheesell's
tion that a heatless day be in-
ted, becomes doubly signifi-
ral good-natured remonstrances
e Gargoyle has deviated from its
non-antagonisitc policy were
red yesterday. The professor
uizzes the day after vacation,
amen cadets, the law faculty,
o-ed, and even The Michigan

. .

_e ,

TICKETS ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION PLAY
POPULAR The Tragedy @19Nan"
PRICES

t1

Sarah

Caswell

must

,.

25c and 35c
A ~tW! U -

By John Maselield.

Angell
uI.au

FRIDAY JAN. 25

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