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January 23, 1918 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

In teres~

Our Reduced

Prices on

OVERC OATS

IT WILL PAY YOU

CLOSING RULE CIMPELS
SHIFTING PLAYS SCENE
COSTUMES ARRIVE; DRESS RE-
HEARSALS TO START
TODAY
Due to the 6 o'clock closing rule
applied to some of the University
buildings, among which is University
hall, Jonh Masefield's "The Tragedy
of Nan," which was to have been
presented by the Oratorical associa-
tion Friday evening, Jan. 25, in Uni-
versity hall, will be played in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall on the same night.
Because of the limited seating capa-
city of Sarah Caswell Angell hall,
people desiring to attend the play are
advised to get their tickets early.
The auditorium has a seating capacity
of only 570. The price for reserved
seats this year has been reduced to
35 cents and general admissions to 251
cents. Tickets have been placed on
sale at Wahr's State street book store.
The costumes for the play, furnish-
ed by William Beck and Son company
of Cincinnati,, have already arrived.
Dress rehearsals will start today.
A letter has been received by Prof.j
Richard D. T. Hollister from John,

WHA'S GOING ON
TODAY
8 o'clock- Intercollegiate Socialist
society meets at 1340 Wilmot street.
TOMORROW
4:15 o'clock-University Symphony
orchestra concert in Hill auditorium.
U-NOTICES
No rehearsal of the Glee club will
be held tomorrow, owing to the ill-
ness of Theodore Harrison.
The Mandolin club will rehearse in
the School of Music instead of Univer-
sity hall, tomorrow night.
FRANCE GRANTS aLMISSOURI
WOMAN HONORARY DEGREE"
St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 22.-Miss Cor-
nelia Brossard of Kirkwood, Mo.,
teacher of French in the Soldan high
school, of St. Louis, received word re-
cently that she has been decorated
by the French government and has re-
ceived from the Educational Depart-
ment of France an honorary degree,
which never before has been bestowed
upon anyone outside of France.
Miss Brossard won distinction from
the French government by teachino

J. K. MALCOLM

004 EAST LIBERTY STREET

*

SERVICE PINS IN COLORS
and B1Bue. One, Two or Three Stars.
Gold Plated, Sterling Silver and Solid Gold.
25e to $1.50
ARCADE JEWELER
J_* WT"T7n 0 M"!V1

I me

R

,12-W

NICUKELSJ4 ARCADE

raw

.

Just Reieed
"How to be a Soldier",
By Brainless Bates
25c per copy
Sheehan & Co.

or

Detroit

NDED UNTIL
ALBION COLLEGE

ion Mich., Jan. 22.-To aid in
xel crisis the Albion college fac-
ias closed college classes entirely
Tuesday, Jan. 29. Next week is
ination week, but these will be
i off and grades given according
,andings of work already done.
Samuel Dickie of the college also
ifered to supply coal to the au-
tos.
school authorities also have
chool sessions in two. The com-
fuel supply of the different build-
s enough for three weeks, under
ary condtions. Mayor E. F. Hoag-
as asked all lodges to postpone
meetings indefinitely.
situation remains the same.
rs are able to keep people going
the supply from the Albion mine,
with what comes in from out-
No one is sold more than a 48
' supply.
VOIS TAKES hONORS AS
BANNER FARM CROP STATE
shington, Jan. 22.-Illinois is the
r farm crop state. Value of her
last year exceeded that of Texas,
carried away the honors of 1916.
s crops also exceeded in value
of Texas last year, placing the
Star State in third position. Iowa
a third place in 1916, with Illin-
cond.
* vast sum of $13,580,768,000 rep-
is the value of all farm crops in
nited States in 1917 as estimated
e Department of Agriculture.
compares with $8,985,870,000 in
and $6,298,220,000, the average
e five years 191.1-15.
n, with a value of $4,053,672,000,
king of crops. Cotton is second
a value of $1,517,558,000. Other
i dollar crops in 1917 were:
$1,307,427,000: hay, $1,359,491,-
nd oats, $1,061,427,000.

150,000 MEN NEEDED AT
ONCE FOR SHIPYARD WORK
One hundred and fifty thousand men
are needed at once in the shipyards of
the United States, according to bulle-
tins received by the Ann Arbor Civic
association. This abnormal demand
has-induced the government to estab-
lish a ship-building school at Hog
Island, Pa.
No previous experience is required
pi men entering the school, although
mechanical training i, desirable. The
school is in charge of practical in-
structors, and unskilled men who are
being trained will be paid 30 cents an
hour, with the assurance that as soon
as they have mastered their trades
they will be advanced. The course
of training will last about six weeks.
In order to encourage enrollment
in the school the government has ar-
ranged special train and boat service
to run direct to the yards.
Rush 800 Box Cars to Rudyard for Hay
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Jan. 22.-
Government priority orders have been
issued for all railroads in the upper
peninsula of Michigan to rush 800 box
cars to Rudyard for hay. Just who
the hay is for is not known. The 800
cars will hold 10,400 tons.
Rudyard is one of the greatest hay
shipping points in the Middle West.
It is in the heart of Chippewa county,
from which more than $1,000,000 worth
of hay has been and will be exported
this season. More than 126,000 tons of
hay is sent from Cloverland yearly by
water and rail.
250,000 Acres Offered To Grazers
Marquette, Mich., Jan. 22.-Men in-
terested in cut-over lands of the Upper
Peninsula of Michigan, are watching
with interest for results of the offer
of 250,000 acres to western grazers at
the annual convention of the National
Wool Growers association this week
in Salt Lake City.
President Leo. C. Harmon of the up-
per peninsula development bureau will
make the offer to the convention. The
lands are divided into tracts of from
1,000 to 25,000 acres. Two years free
usage of the lands is offered.
Rugs cleaned and washed.. Satisfac-
tion guaranteed. Koch and Henne.-

Masefield, author of the play, who is **i1CPlm;"6V-111****** w~lur
in this country on a lecture tour, stt- French at a local hospital to Red Cross
in hewasnvyry alearedtosat-}nurses and soldiers at Jefferson bar-
ing that he was very pleased to have racks. This work s:he has one with-
the Oratorical association use the play. . out compensation.
Last year the association produced T enoyF
Shakspere's"Mery ivesof ind The honorary degree which France
Shakespeare's "Merrys Wive of Wnd has bestowed on Miss Brossard is giv-
sor," and Heinrik Ibsen's "Pillars of !enaonlystoedistngMishedBroessorsin
Society," and in the year previous was en only to distinguished professors in
produced "The Servant in the House," France. So far as is known, no other
and three Irish plays. Each of these person in America ever received it,
was proclaimed a success.
SOUTH DAKOTA STOCK MAN
MOVES TO "RELAY FARM"
FIVE GOVERNORS PLEAD FOR E T E"
MOVEMENT OF CORN CROPS!
Menominee, Mich., Jan. 22.-W. J.
Buckingham, one of the leading stock
Washington, D. C., Jan. 22.-Tele- men of South Dakota, a breeder of
grams from the governors of Illinois, famous race horses and owner of
Indiana, Iowa, Ohio, and Kansas, de- George Gano, the stallion which, with
glaring that unless the corn crop is Minor Heir, holds .the world's team
moved within the next few weeks record, has purchased the Ludington-
much of it will be lost, were laid be- Wells "Relay Farm" and will move
fore Director General McAdoo today his stock here from the West. Mr.
by, Representative McCormick of Illin- Buckingham became interested in'
cis, who requested that a practical Cloverland as a result of the "more
railroad man be appointed to take sheep, more wool" cry which brought
charge of moving it to light the great waste of the clover
Gov. Lowden of Illinois telegraphed and grasses on cut-over lands. He is
that practically 80 per cent of the Illi- the first actual live stock man to move
nois corn crop will have to be moved into the Upper Peninsula this year,
within the next few weeks or there but there are many western grazers
will be serious loss. .looking over the country. Speedy
From. Iowa Gov. Harding tele- growth of pastures, natural water,
graphed that practically no corn in lack of droughts and proximity to
his state had been shipped or even markets are the prinple arguments
stored in elevators. "We should have to the live stock men.
every car possible in the state for
mnoving our corn," he added. 14 SHIPS COALED IN NEW YORK
Gov. Goodrich of Indiana sent word HARBOR DESPITE INJUNCTION
that only 5 per cent of Indiana's corn
crop has been moved and that 60 per New York, Jan. 22.-Despite the
cent of Indiana's crop of 2,000,000 worst ice conditions in New York har-
bushels still was on the farms and bor since the beginning of the pres-
only 1 per cent in the country eleva- ent zero weather, fourteen ships were
Mtors. coaled here yesterday, according to of-
Ohio, according to Gov. Cox, has ,ficials of the United States shipping
Xparketed 20 per cent of its corn crop, board.
and 75 per cent is still on the farms. Approximately 100 vessels are now'
Gov. Capper telegraphed from Kan- in the harbor and the board expects
sas that only 10 per cent of the state's'to reduce this number of -delayed ships
merchantable corn crops has been by one-half by the end of the week.
moved and less than 10 per cent is in Fuel administrators expressed them-
the country elevators, which must be selves as generally satisfied with the
mnoved before March 1. way New York was observing work-
Nebraska is the cnly state where the, less Monday, although they were hav-
corn situation is normal, according to ing trouble with claims for exemption
the reports. which continued to pour in.
CET LThree Irish Papers Barred From Mails
COMMITTEES PLAN TO ENLIST Washington, Jan. 22.-The postof-
EAfice department has sustained the de-
cision of the postmaster at New York
/Washington, Jan. 22.-Measures in- in excluding from the second class
tended to conciliate Progressives and ailing promethe seo thas
enlit te wmen n prtyorganiza-mailing privileges the issue of the
enlist the women in party 4ra lz rish World of Jan. 19, which contain-
tions were adopted today by the Pro- Iri orl man19rhe onain -
gressive and Republican national ex- j ed editorial matter held to be in viola-
grive nditepbscafter a pirtedna - tion of the espionage act. The depart-
ecutive committees after a spirited dis- ment also has under consideration re-
cusson
The final recommendations which cent issues of the Gaefic'American
Thlbe presentedomenationle and the New York Freeman's Journal,
will e prsentd to he ntionl hex
ecutive committee at St. Louis, Feb. 11, other Irish papers held up at the New
one day before the meeting of the cen- York office for the alleged violations
tral committee, were that the cam- of a similar nature.
paign committee of 1916, consisting of o
the executive committee and six Pro- .old Weather Kills Quail in Missouri
the xectivecomitte an sixPro St. Louis, Jan. 22-Quail throughout
gressives, be continued for congress- t.souiseJyn. f2-Quanthofgfod
ional elections next year, and that Nissouri are dying from want of food
this campaign and the advisory com- and thousands more will perish if the
mittee of Progressives who assisted cold weather continues, Tim Birming-
Republicans in the 1916 campaign be ham, state game and fish commission-
invited to participate in the party con- er, says. Birmingham issued an ap-
ference Feb. 12, and that an advisory peal to all farmers to feed the quail.
committee of women be created for The state will reimburse them where
future party campaigns. payment is desired, he said.

FUEL SCARCITY HINDERS
MANUFACTURE OF GOODS
SHIPMENTS STOPPED BY COLD
WEATHER; HARBORS FULL
OF SHIPS
The state of trade, according to
Bradstreet's, is tending to emerge from
the annual seasonal dullness. But cold
and stormy weather, and coal scarcity
have hindered shipping of all kinds,
and this, in turn, has caused slow-
ing down of manufacturing.
The fuel situation is apparently no
better from Chicago east to the coast,
and there is said to be an immense
congestion of freight at leading north
Atlantic ports, especially New York,
where the harbor is full of ships wait-
ing for coal to allow of sailing. Grain
shipments from Baltimore have been
impossible owing to the harbor being
iced bound. The sugar shortage is un-
relieved owing to ships that might be
used to carry Cuban supplies being un-
able to sail thence, and the reported
approach of another cold wave.
The iron and steel situation is like-
wise affected by the coal shortage, and
the large increase in unfilled orders
has a not altogether favorable side,
due to some of this being charged to
past paucity of fuel supplies.
DIRECTING AIRPLANE OFFICE
TO BE MOVED TO CLEVELAND
Washington, Jan. 22-The directing
office of the government airplane con-
struction program ic .soon to be mov-
ed from Washington to Cleveland, it
is stated unofficially. The change will
be announced before Feb. 1.
Detroit, Dayton and Buffalo have
been suggested as locations for the
office because in these three cities
are the princiapl -aircraft works.
Secretary Baker, however, has de-
Aided on his home town on the
ground that it would be improper to
put the office in any one of the cit-
les that are vitally interested in
tbe industrial side of the aircraft
work.
ARREST MAX BREITUNG ON
ALLEGED CONSPIRACYCHARGE
Chicago, Jan. 22.-Max Breitung, un-
der indictment in New York for al-
leged conspiracy to blow up muni-
tions ships, occupies a cell in the
detective bureau today. He was tak-
en from his rooms in the Congres
hotel by federal agents and locked
up pending the arrival of a presiden-
tial warrant.
Unique Poster Warns Inhabitants
London, Jan. 22.-In a hamlet near
Ashford, boasting only nine inhabi-
tants, the following notice has been
posted by the authorities: "In the
event of an air raid, do not collect in a
rowd."
THE VEGETABLE MARKET, 117
West Washington St. (Phone 2190F-3),
has just received a large consignment
of home grown celery, rutabagas, hub-
bard squash, and sand grown pota-
toes, in addition to its complete line
of other vegetables. Do not forget our
fresh eggs, butter, cream cheese, and
excellent variety of apples, oranges,
grape fruit, etc. Of course, you know
our prices are the lowest possible.
Free delivery.-Adv.
Recreation makes for Efficiency.
"We try to treat you right. Huston
Bros.-Adv. tf.

Nights: Orh- fl A R R I ; ;Pop.MatsWed
estra $i.5U~c&$2and Sat..IU5
BalanceHouse DETROIT n St,5
25c to $1.00 DTRT to $10
CLOSED THIS WEEK
COMING O RBO
NEXT WEEK OH
ARCADE
(Closed Monday and Tuesday by order
of U. S. Fuel Administrator)
Shown' at 3. 7 and 8:30 Eastern Time
Sc. Unless Otherwise Specified.
Wed-23-Sonia Mark-ova in "The Paint-
ed Madonna," and Mutt and Jeff
Cartoon, "Laughing Gas."
'rhurs-Fri-24-25-MXae "Marsh in "The
Cinderella Man" and Christie Corn
edy, "Green Eyes and Bullets."

r4

Count Czernin, i Austro-Hungar-
ian foreign minister, is quoted as say-
ing that the country wants neither ter-
ritory noi- indemnity from Russia.
The Japanese embassy at Petrograd
has .issued an official statement deny-
ing that Japanese troops were landed
at Vladivostok, Russia.
There are now 7,500,000 Britons un-
der arms.
French aviators destroyed six Ger-
' man planes last Saturday.
Pan-German newspapers are hailing
the removalof the Kaiser's secretary,
von Valentini, as a triumph for their
cause, and as marking the disappear-
ance of the last remanant of the Beth-
pann-Hollweg system.
Enlistment of 30,000 more women
ir; the military nursing service will
be required if prospective needs of the
government are met.
Major General Gorgas, surgeon gen-
eral of the army, has announced the
precision of the war department to ex-
tend its psychological examination to
all enlisted men and to all newly ap-
pointed officers of the army.
Shorthand writing a'nd telephone
operating are two of the occupations
England has found for her blind sol-
diers.
Formation of an American legion
of honorhas been disapproved by the
administration.
A provisional agreement, recently
signed in London, provides a charter
for one round trip for the 80 Dutch
steamers now in American ports. They
will not go into the war zones, and
will carry 150,000 tons of food for
needy Belgians. Five will take car-
go for Switzerland and two for the
Netherlands Overseas trust.
German shells and German wanton-

ness have razed more
French villages.

than 1,000

* General Pershing is asking for 6,000
more Y. M. C. A. secretaries to go
abroad at the rate of 1,000 a month.
Iluns to Break Relations With Trotsky
* Copenhagen, Jan. 22.-A German
newspaper, a copy of which has been
received here, says that unless Leon
Trotzky accepts the demands of the
central powers when he returns to the
peace negotiations on Jan. 29, the cen-
tral powers will break off negotiations.
Gasoline 23, Polarine 60o. Staebler
4 Co., 117 8. Ashley Bt.-Adv.
Wuerth Theatre
PHONE 6o-J PRICES: iSc
s Central Standard Time
Matinees 3:oo Evenings 7:oo, 8:30
-
Mondays Closed
Tues-ed-22-Margery 'isn in
"A Counterfeit Scent," and Weekly._
_ C-
Thur-Fri-24-25-Pauline Stark in "Until
They dGet Me." Also Comedy, "A
ay B .
A SES-
Shows: 3-7-8:30--Eastern Time
PRICES-10e and 1e-PRICES

Wed. Jan. 23

anquet Held Last Night
e members attended the
b banquet held last night
cafe. During the dinner,
es were given by mem-
e short business meeting
eld after the banquet the
'as chosen as the ensign

I Adv.

WM. DESMOND
"Fighting Back"
-and-
"A Hero's Fall"
A Big Laugh
Thurkday, Jan. 24
WM. DUNCAN
and
CAROL HOLLOWAY
"The Tenderfoot"
- also -
'Spoons and Spasms"
Vitagraph Comedy

Stationery for Every Need!
Michigan Seal and Block "M" Paper, Eaton Crane's Highland Linen
and Linen Lawn, Fountain Pens and Writing Materials.
at the only

A gain Denies Engagement to Pershing
El Paso, Tex., Jan. 22.-Miss Anita
Patton of_ SauMarino, Cal., today de-
i:ied reports that she is engaged to
American forces in France.
Class dancing at the Packard Aea-
demy Tuesday and Thursday eve-
ing., 7:30 to 9:30. Private lessons
by appointment. .'raone 1850-F.
-Adv.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-'AdV.

$.r r w

-t

I

I

225 E. Liberty. Phone 1321
GODOHEW FLORAL COB

anlts'

Supply

Store

Flowers
Plants
Ferns

Baskets
Corsages
Deoratlons

NOTE: Wea
only on TUe
Week.

Phone 1160-R

I

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