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January 20, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-20

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WEATHER rwia
R AND COLDER j
TODAYs

&U1IIlV

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRI
SERVICE

III. No. 84.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 1918.

PRICE THREE

_ . . r

L SAYINGs PLAN
CCESS REPORTS
EOTOR GARFIELD

NOW REACHING
Y WHERE NEED
GREATEST

TERRI-
IS

BUNKERS
SHIPS FOR

OF
FRANCE

Stream of Coal Carriers
roceeding to New Eng-
land

Washington, Jan. 19. - A steady
w of coal into famine stricken dis-
ets of the east was reported to-
ght by Fuel Administrator Garfield
a statement setting forth the re-
Its of the first two days operations
the government's five day fuel
striction order.
The statement declares that coal is
aching consumers in territory where
e need has been the greatest.
Sufficient for Ships
For the first time in many weeks,
al in transit for bunkering ships is
ore than sufficient for the need.
ith the assistance of the shipping
ard and the railroad administration
'. Garfield prepared to have barge
cilities in New York and other At-
atto ports pooled.
Detroit, Jan. 19.-A committee num
ring five, representing the city coun-
and business men, will go to Lans-
g Monday to confer with the state
el administrator in the hope of se-
ring a modification of the factory
.d store closing order.
Washington, Jan. 19.-Ships in the
al carrying trade between Hampton
Dads and New York or Boston and
>rtland, Me., have been doubled in
amber in the last three weeks and
.th better weather, a steady stream
bunker and domestic coal is. pro-
eding to New England.
New York, Jan. 19.-New York City
aerged today from the haze of
iubt into which.it had been plunged
r the federal fuel administrator's
e day industrial closing order. Ships
ith munitions, clothing and food for
e American soldiers in France made
eparations to go to sea when sup-
les of fuel became available for
em
Reports received from the eastern
lf of the country showed that freight
ungestion was elearing.
Washington, Jan. 19.-The fuel ad-
Inistration today issued a definite
der changing the heatless days for
eaters from Monday to Tuesday.
Lansing, Jan. 19.-Relief for Mich-
an in the coal famine is indicated by
ports to State Fuel- Administrator
rudden. It is said that shipments of.
nergency coal have been started
>rthward.
Requests for interpretation of Dr.
irfield's order and the state order
ok up the time of the administrator
day. The food administrator will
Las on applications of food manufac-
.rers.
REVENT EMMA GOLDMAN FROM
GIVING SCHEDULED LECTURES
Emma Goldman held an informal
ception and talk yesterday at the
>me of one of her followers, regard-
ss of the police intervention which
ohibited her lectures which were
,heduled at the Woodman hall.
Mayor Wurster ordered 'that the
ctures were not to be held and the
>lice department sent an officer ro
e hall to prevent the gathering of
mma Goldman's hearers. The lec-
arer is on a 30 day leave before serv-
g her two-year sentence in the fed-
ral penitentiary.

BAR WOMEN FROM
UNION FESTIVAL
Senate Committee Grants Union Per-
mnission To Hold
Affair
Women are to be barred from par-
ticipation in the vaudeville or side-
shows connected with the midwinter
benefit to be given by the Union Feb.
15 in the combined gymnasiums.
The Senate Committee on Student
affairs has granted the Union's po-
sition to hold such an affair, at the
same time imposing the preceding reg-
ulation. The committee also decided
tiat, for the purpose of eligibility, the
party should be considered a first sem-
ester activity.
Fraternities are to have charge of
the booths. An executive committe ,
the members of which have not been
named, will manage the entire af-
fair.
The Union is giving the benefit in
order to reimburse itself for the $1,000
sent to the American University union
in Paris.
MINERS xRATIFY WAGE
AGREEMENT OF ICT, 6
SCHEDULE PROVIDES INCREASED
PAY AND PENALTIES FOR
VIOLATORS
Indianapolis, Jan. 19.-After two
days of debate the United Mines Work-
ers of America at their convention rat-
ified the Washington agreement of
Oct. 6, which grants substantial wage
advances to bituminous coal miners
and provides penalties for violation
of contracts. The agreement became
effective Nov. 1, last, and remains in
force until April 1, 1920, unless the
war ends before that date, in which
event it automatically terminates.
John B. White, rormer president of
the organization, and now assistant to
Dr. Garfield, spoke for an hour in 4e-
fense of the action of the international
officers in accepting the clause.
Charles Findley of Michigan, wh
opposed the agreement, said the fuel
administrator was no friend of the
miners.,
CHICAGO DEBATERS
DEFEAT MICHGAN
Maize and Blue Still Leads Central
Debating League In 20
Year Series

Facto

FOOD PUREY ORS
TO OPEN MONDAY,

USSIAgNS TO CALL
PEACE CONFERENCE

ORDER PUTS O LOCAL MEN UNS REAFFIRM POSITIONI
OUT OF WORK FOR FIVE DAYS IUOF KAISER REGARDING WAR

ories Working on Govern
Contracts Will Reopen To-
morrow

nment Chairman

of Assembly Says
Position Requires
Step

Merchants Draw Up Mutual Schedules
to Enable Fair Obesrvance
of Rule

Chamber
Has

Party's

REGENTS APPROVE
WIRELESS COURSE
S Hours Credit and Exemption From
Training To Be Given For
Work
Authorization for a course of wire-
less telegraphy to be given under
Prof. John C. Parker of the engineer-
ing college which will furnish eight
hours of credit, was made by the Board
of Regents at their meeting Thursday.
Students taking this course who
have been admitted to the engineers'
reserve will be exempted from com-
pulsory military service until com-
pleting it in June. The only require-
ment for enrollment in the course is
engineering EE2 or its equivalent.
Senior engineers and seniors in the
literary college who have taken the
equivalent of engineering EE2 in the
physics department and a few of the
junior engineers are the only ones be-
ing permitted to take this course.
Thus far; 44 students have enrolled.

of Lords States Emperor
Right to Make War or
Peace

PLAY MAY MAKE TRI
DURING SPRING REC]

Grocery stores, meat markets, and
other purveyors of foodstuffs will be al-
lowed to remain open Mondays regard-
less of the closing order of Fuel Ad-
ministrator Garfield which governs
places of business. Distributors of
foods are permitted to keep their
stores open for the regular nine-hour
day, according to the rule.
Mayor Ernest M. Wurster has an--
nounced that grocers and butchers
need have no fear of violating the law
if they remain open Monday, provid-
ing they close Sunday. Milk dealers
will be allowed to distribute milk on
Sunday as well as Monday.
Many Men Out of Work
About 500 men in the city, as near
as can be learned, are having an en-
forced vacation because of the five-
day closing rule that governs all in-
dustries except those doing contract
work for the government. The Hoover
.plant will reopen Monday because it
is in this class. All employees have
been ordered to report for work as
usual. The Elwell Trolley Supply
company is also in operation the same
as ever. Store employees will have
a day's vacation on Monday. Other
industries will reopen Wednesday.
Hours Finally Announced
Hours for the merchants have been
chosen as follows: General merchan-
dise, 8 to 5. daily except Monday; 8 to
8 Saturday; drug stores, downtown 9
to 6, State street 11 to 8; confection-
ery and lunch stores, 11 to 1 and 3 to
10; restaurants, 7 to 9:30, 11 to 2:30,
and 5 to 8; theaters, five hours a day
except Monday and Tuesday; food pur-
veyors, 8 to 5 five days of week, Sat-
urday 8 to 8, Sunday closed. Drug
stores will be allowed to keep open
Monday providing they sell drugs and
drug sundries only and do not en-
croach upon the rights of other stores
by selling other merchandise. Confec-
tionery stores must close on Sunday
as well as on Monday. Saturday hours
for nearly all stores are from 8 to S.
Downtown stores will run on central
and State street stores on eastern
time.
Complaints Made
Many complaints were made to the
police office yesterday stating that
merchants in various parts of the city
were not closing according to the
laws. Every violator was immediate-
ly notified by the police that he must
close or be prosecuted. There will be
no leniency shown in the enforcement
of the rules, according to Chief of
Police O'Brien. All offenders will be
considered unpatriotic and prosecut-
ed without exception. It is absolute-
ly essential that everyone observe the
laws for the mutual welfare of the
whole community.
Clubs Undecided
Several clubs and lodges are unde-
cided as to what can be done to co-
operate with the merchants in sav-
ing fuel. Hours in some cases will
probably be shortened and fuel and
light are being conserved everywhere.
The Union and Christian associations
were the first to close their buildings
earlier and others are expected to
follow their example. Clubs are not
regulated by the rulings but are
prompted to act by patriotism.
Trains Keep Schedule
Trains are running on their old
schedules, unaffected by the coa
shortage and closing laws. All lines
entering Ann Arbor have the regular
trains and cars running and do not
. expect to change times.
(Continued on Page Six)

WO MEN TO AS5U 9
FEMALE R~OLES
19,18 UNION OPi
SENATE COMMITTEE ON STU
AFFAIRS GRANTS UNIOIN
PETITION

Petrograd, Jan. 19.- M. Pchernoff,
elected chairman of the constituentE
assembly by the social revolutionists,
declared today that the constituent
asembly should immediately call af
conference of the entente allies to con-..
sider war ams.
In discussing the war situation, he
said:
"Our party's position on the ques-
tion of peace is that the constituent
assembly should immediately call a
conference of all the allies to consider
the aims of the war."
Russia Can Fight
"Everybody said that Russia cannot
fight because of the extreme state of
disorganization. All know that the de-
cision in this war will be on the west-
ern front. Russia can act as a magnet
to draw German forces and prevent
their being thrown to the western
front."
Washington, Jan. 19.-The right of
the German emperor to the exclusive
making of war or peace has been re-
affirmed in the Prussian chamber of'
'ords in the adoption of a resolution
aflat a dispatch today from Berne
states.
Has Right
Accompanying the resolution was
this commentary:
"The president of the United States
has asked if the German negotiations
in Russia are in the name of the maj-
ority of the reichstag or in the name
of the military party. For our part
we affirm that it is the German em-
peror who has the exclusive right to
make war and peace.'
GIRLS MAKE MERRY
AT ANNUAL PARTY
Juniors Win Class Prize for Stunts;
Westminster House Takes
Group Prize
Clowns danced with Red Cross nurs-
es, potato bugs with fairies, and baby
dolls with monkeys at the annual fan-
cy dress party of. the Women's league
last night. Barbour gymnasium floor
was crowded with personages of every
race, nationality, and occupation. Hap-
py Hooligan and Maud appeared, as
did Lochinvar with his stolen bride,
and Mr. Hoover with all his articles
of diet.
Between dances, for which music
was furnished by Ike Fisher, the alum-
nae and the four classes gave stunts.
The junior production won the prize,
with honorable mention to the alum-
nae. Westminster house, dressed as
vegetables and bugs, was voted the
best of the groups.
Rita Ireman, '21, as a ballet dancer,
was given the award for the prettiest
costume; Kameyo Sadakata, '19, as a
Japanese doll, was considered the
most perfect; Marian Galton, '18, as
Mrs. Corntossel, was the homeliest;
and Kathleen Teer, '20, a Darktown
beauty, was the funniest.
The judges were: Mrs. Junius E.
Beal, Mrs. W. D. Henderson, and Miss
Alice Evans. Nona Myers, '18, chair-
man of the social committee of the
league, had charge of the party.
Cosmopolitan Club Holds Meeting
Members of the Cosmopolitan club
held a business meeting last night in
room 301, University hall, to .discuss
various plans for the new year.

SIR GEORGE PARKI N TO
SPEAK AT UNION MIXER
"EUROPE AT WAR" WILL BE SUB)-
JECT OF TALK BY SECRE-
TARY OF RHODES FUND
Sir George R. Parkin will speak onc
"Europe at War" at the mixer to be
held from 3 to 5 o'clock this after-
noon at the Union. Sir Parkin is -sec-
retary of the Rhodes scholarship trustf
fund.
The musical program for the after-f
noon will consist of "jazz" and proba-
bly a vocal solo.-
The committee for today is as fol-
lows: J. 0. Goodsell, Jr., '18D, Walter
Atlas, '18, Clarence Roeser, '19, Don-
ald M. Springer, '19E, John Chase, '19,;
Arthur Ippel, '18, Laurel Lundquist,
'19, Harry Cossitt, '19, Charles Buell,
'19, and Raymond Beardsley, '19.
Gerald Gabriel, '18, has resigned
from his position as chairman of the
Sunday afternoon mixer committee,
and Ralph Gault, '19, has been ap-
pointed to his position. William
Granse, '19, has been chosen to take
Gault's place. The other member of
the committee is Sherwald Sedgwick,
'19.
50 Couples Attend Fresh Lit Mixer
About 50 couples were in attendance
at the fresh lit mixer yesterday after-
noon in Barbour gymnasium. Ike
Fisher personally conducted the five-
piece orchestra furnishing the music.
Refreshments were served. The chap-
erones were President Harry B.
Hutchins and Mrs. Hutchins, Dean
John R. Effinger and Mrs. Effinger, As-
sistant Deans of Women Louise Wells
and Louise Potter, Registrar Arthur
G. Hall and Mrs. Hall, Mr. and Mrs.
Jonathan F. Scott, and the Misses
Dawley and Greenwood.
Security League Praises Solons
New York, Jan. 19.-The national
security league paid tribute today to
Senator Chamberlain of Oregon, and
Representative Kahn of California,
at a luncheon- given in their honor,
the speakers referring to their efforts
in congress in the interests of national
defense. Theodore Roosevelt spoke at
the luncheon.
Custer Stages Hare and Hound Race
Camp Custer, Jan. 19.-The third
weekly hare and hound race was
staged here early today by athleti
authorities of Camp Custer following
recommendations of Major General
James Parker. More than 1,000 enlist-
ed men of Michigan and Wisconsin
competed.
Allies Gain Mile North of Jerusalem
London, Jan. 19.-The war office is-
sued the following statement: "Yes-
terday our line was advanced to a
maximum depth of a mile on a four
mile front, 2 miles north of Jerus-
alem.

U

First Tryouts for Feminine Cst a
Chorus Parts Scheduled for
Tuesday
Women will be permitted to ta
part in "Let's Go," the 1918 Un
opera.
The annual opera trip may be ma
during the spring vacation.
These are the results of action takl
by the senate committee on stud
affairs in regard to a petition prese
ed by the Michigan Union. The i
solution passed by the committee a
as follows:
"At the meeting of the senate co
mittee on student affairs, held Jan.
the request of the Michigan Uni
that women mlight be allowed to ta
the feminine parts in the Union oa
was granted under the following .c
ditions:
Provisions of Resolutions
"First, that the persons who ta
part in the opera, including the co
mittee work, must be regular stude
taking full work in the University
in the University School of Music, a
that all participants shall be subi
to the eligibility rules of the Unive
ty and to their administration by P
fessor Humphreys, the chairman
the University committee on eligil
ity; secondly, that in the case of
women who take part, parental p
mission must be first secured and fi
in writing with Miss Agnes Wells, a
ing dean of women. All other det
will be subject, as usual, to the sen
committee on student affairs.
Spring Vacation Trip
"The senate committee on -stud
affairs also transmitted to the sen
council the request of the Michis
Union to be allowed to take an o
of-town trip during the spring va
tion, with the recommendation tha
be granted."
Reasons for Petition
The petition was presented to
committee by the Union, after it se
ed evident that there would be i
ficient talent to assume both the n
and feminine roles in the opera. Mi
of the men who, in former years, h
taken part in the opera, have eni
ed the service, and the Union has t
been depriYed of a number of its p
pective actors.
For Duration of War
The practice of allowing womer
participate in the opera may ext
only for the duration of the war,'
er which the Union may return to
former policy of producing the i
with men assuming all roles.
The cast of "Let's Go," includes
or eight feminine parts, with 12 w
en in the chorus.
First Tryouts
The first tryouts for women for.
cast and chorus are to be held a
o'clock Tuesday afternoon 'at
School of Music. Freshmen women
not eligible.
Announcement of the names of
men who survived the tryouts and
hearsals held Wednesday evening
the Union will be mnade in Tuesd
Daily. Delay in making eliminat
prevented the list from being publ
ed Friday morning, as prevlousl
nounced.
lMfove S. C. A. To LAw Buinli
The offices of the Students" Chris
association were moved to room 1
the Law building yesterday. -]
step was necessitated by .the
shortage that closed Lane 'and V
berry halls. The Newberry tea r
has not been moved yet.

Two defeats in the forensic art were
Michigan's lot Friday. On top of the
defeat at the hands of Northwestern
came the news that the affirmative
team had been defeated by Chicago
with a score of 3 to 0.
Northwestern's negative and affirma-
tive teams were both winners. Chica-
go won from Michigan's affirmative
but lost to Northwestern's negative.
This left Michigan's teams with a
cipher attached to their place on the
scoreboard.
The final reckoning for the twenty-
year 14erles is as follows: Michigan
10, Northwestern 8, Michigan 12, Chi-
cago 8.
SEND OUT $5000 INCOME TAX
BLANKS FROM WASHINGTON
The personal income tax blanks
have been sent out from Washington
and will arrive in Ann Arbor in a
few days. These are the blanks to be
used by persons whose incomes are
not more than $5,000 a year. The
blanks for larger incomes, or for cor-
porations, have not yet been sent out.
Many business men of Ann Arbor!
will be affected by the income tax, as
well as members of the faculty. Few
students, however, will have to pay
the tax, as only a small percentage of
them have incomes.

Union Service

Speaker: DR. LEO"

N. FRANKLIN

T

Hill

"THE TIMES AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS"

Under Auspices of Jewish Students' Congregation

,m

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