100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

j

TEMPERATURE
TODAY

i
i

I I

00 AV

tt

DAYAT

VTICE

i

..

;VIII. No. 82.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1918.

PRIC

DE THREE

-

T

SINOMIZ ON
.AT AND LI6HT

HUNS AND
QUIBBLE

RUSSIANS
ON PEACE

AUTHORITY GIVEN PRESIDENT
AND SUPERINTENDENT
PARDON
HEALTH SERVICE TO
GIVE SIX LECTURES
Diplomas Awarded To Candidates In
Dentistry, Engineering,
and Law
President Harry B. Hutchins and
acting superintendent of buildings and
grounds E. C, Pardon were author-
ized by the Board of Regents yester-
day t supervise the use of heat and
light of University buildings, and to
close all rooms heated or lighted for
non-e sential purposes or used by a
small number of students. Authority
was also given to consolidate work in
glass rooms to bring about fuel con-
Provisions were made for compul-
sory attendance of all new students
of the literary and engineering col-
leges of a course of six one-hour lec-
tures on persoial health, to be con-
ducted by the health service. Pro-
visions were also made t obtain a
sanitation -inspector to be added to
the staff of the health service.
The Board approved of the affiliat-
ed relationship between the medical
school of the University and the medi-
cal school of the college of Akron, 0.
Students may take their pre-medic
course there preparatory to entering
the school here.
The Frederick Stearns collection of
mollusks, valued at $20,000, now at
the Detroit museum, will be given co
the University museum, providing ade-
quate care is taken of it. The $300
needed to provide for the installation
of the collection was appropriated by
the. Board.
Michigan branch of the D. A. R. re-
quested that the fund given by them to.
the University to be known -as the D.
A. R. student lon fund, be changed to
the D. A. R. eimergency fund. It wa
als requested that the fund be avail-
able to any. student, man or woman,
American or foreign born, in any de-
partment.
Lieutenant Losey J. Williams was
appointed assistant professor of mili-
tary science. Arnold H. Eggerth was
appointed. assistant in bacteriology.
Dental diplomas were awarded to
Harold C. Kahn, Ralph A. Dennison,
and John H. Lock, all of the class of
1917. The degree of bachelor of law
was awarded to Fred S. Flick. Ern-
esto useo was awarded a degree of
bachelor of science of electrical en-
ginering, and Peter R. Downie, de-
gree of bachelor qf science of chemi-
e.l engineering.'
fEESU ENGINEERS TO FROLIC
AT "YELLQW BJTTON BALL"
NYellow Button Ball," the dan0e to
be given by the fresh engineers at the
Union tonight, promises to be a great
success. Enough tickets have been
sold already to cover expenses and
they are still in demand, The commit-
tee has arranged several novel fea-
tures, beside Ike Fischer's best jazz
music.
The committee in charge consists
of R. F. Grindley, R. B. Marshall, H.
I,. Parker, R. H. Brown, C. W. Boydell,
J. A. Spence, and C. N. Johnston.
Tickets may be obtained from any of
these men or at the Busy Bee.
Shovellng Snow Causes City Big Bill
Cleaning the city's streets of snow
has cost the city just $570 since the

first of the year. This is an increase
of $43 over all that was spent last
yeat for the same purpose.

Bolshevik Thrten Roumanians with
capture of King Ferdin-
and
(By Associated Press)
Jan. 17.-The Teutonic allies and
the Bolsheviki are still deadlocked
over the question of peace terms' The
stumbling block evidently is over the
evacuation of occupied territory de-
manded by the Russians in order that
the inhabitants should have freedom
in expressing their desires as to their
future government.
An official German statement says
the Russian proposals. regarding the
evacuation are so divergent from the
ideals of the Central powers in their
present form as to be unacceptable to
Germany and her allies,
No Change In Situation
Apparently there has been no ame-
liorations in the situation existing be-
tween the Bolsheviki and the Rouman-
ian government. Following closely
upon theg ultimatum to Roumania,
threatening energetic military meas-
ures if the Roumanians fail immed-
iately to release members of the Bol-
sheviki who were arrested, according
to the official announcement, it is
said, that the arrest of -King Ferdin-
and has been ordered by the Bolshe-
viki. If captured the monarch was to
be brought to Petrograd and impris-
oned,
Bolshevki Fight
Fighting between the Bolsheviki and
the counter revolutionary forces con-
tinue in various points in Russia pro-
per and Siberia. Hostilities between
the Ukeranians and Bolsheviki forces
at Odessa, again has broken out.
Warships are said to have bombared
the city.
Another mutiny is declared to have
broken out recently at Germany's
naval base at Kiel.
AVITION CORPS ETS
160 NEW PPLICNTS
FLYING OPEN TO DRAFTED MEN;
WORK IN AIR SCHOOLS
EXPLAINED
One hundred and fifty University
men took out applications today for
the United States signal corps, avia
tion section, flying, at the conference
held in the Athletic association offices
by Capt. Paul P. Magoffin, president
of tne Aviation examining board of
Detroit.,-
Questions of the nature of examina-
tions and methods of procedure were
answered by the captain, and a gen-
eral explanation of the flying branch
of tie army was given.
How t Apply for Commission
To apply for a commission In the
flying corps, it is necessary to fill out.
and file with the Detroit board of ex-
aminers at Harper hospital, an appli-
cation blank. This blank is self ex-
planatory. It must be sworn to before
a notaryf who must affl his seal.
Physical examination of the applicant
must be made by some reputable phy-
sician, and three letters of recom-
mendation from Americans who are
neither relatives nor under any ob-
ligation to the applicant, must also ac-
company the blank'
From 10 to 16 days will elapse from
the time the application is received at
Harper hospital, Detroit, until the ap-
plicant is called for physical examina-
tion. Applicants must be over 19
years of age. If a man passes the ex-
amination, from five to seven weeks

will elapse before he is called to
ground school for his actual training.
The course in ground school consists
of from five to eight weeks training
in elementary aeronautics, mathemat-
ics and gas engine wbrk. here the
student begins his day at 5:30 o'clock
in the moriing and continues till 9
o'clock in the evening. 4t any time
(Continued on Page Six)

INDUSTRIES AWAIT
ORDER TO CLO0SE
Stores and Plants May Continue on
Present Schedule Pending
Specific Ruling
MAYOR WURSTER RECEIVES
NO OFFICIAL INFORMATION

GARFIELD OR
' F r ;: FACTORIES' CLil
DESPI{PRO

AD-MINISTRATOR'S 0
THROUGH IN SPI
BUSINESS
S HOOLS KEEP O
ON SHOP H

News of
city

Garfiels Action Reaches
Only Through News-
papers

A few industries in Ann Arbor are
awaiting definite orders regarding the
new closing rules issued by both
Fuel Administrator Garfield and State
Fuel Administrator Prudden. Although
most business places will close no in-
formation has been given the mayor
relative to the enforcement of the ord-
ers and the only news of the rules has
come from the newspapers, Some
stores and manufacturing plants do
not wish to close their places-aofbusi-
ness until specific orders are received.
Several manufacturing plants have
endeavored to secure advice on the
question but no definite information
can be gotten. In all probability,
some of the plants and stores will re-
main open on Monday and work during
their regular hours until an order to
close is received.
Mayor Issues Request
Mayor Ernest M. Wurster has been
given no orders from either Mr. Gar-
field or Mr. Prudden, but he has re-
quested all stores and manufacturing
plants to abide by the rule. It will
be a patriotic move for any firm to
close whether or not the enforcement
order is received. It is not known as
yet what steps will be taken in re-
spect to business places which remain
open.
Most Stores Act
Most stores have taken up the order
immediately and observed the nine-
hour-a-day rule yesterday. Huston
Brothers store on State street, will
keep open as follows: First five days
of week from 1 to 10 o'clock, Saturday
10 to 10 o'clock, Sunday as usual. This
was one of the first stores to abide
by the state proclamation.
Vogl Sipply Repleuished
Another carload of coal arrived yes-
terday and was assigned to the police
for sale at the price of $4.75 per half-
ton. All the coal turned over to the
city by the University has been sold
but is not all delivered yet.
The Hoover Steel Ball company is
undecided whether they will re-open
their plant Monday or wait until Wed-
(Continued on Page Six)
670 Students Hit
Approximately 670 men in the Unt-
versity will be affected by the proposed
ruling that all men who have become
21 years old since June 5, 1917, he
conscripted for miilitary service. This
is the statement made by Secretary
Shirley W. Smith yesterday when ask-
ed how the University would be affect-
ed by the Chamberlain resolution now
awaiting passage in congress.
. "Four or Five weeks ago," said Sec-
retary Smith, "we compiled a list of
the ages of all students enrolled in the
UniversityA More students, we
found, were 20 years old upon regis-
tering in October, 1917, than any other
age."

Interests May
Wilson

Appeal to
to Repeal Fu
Order

EARL
'19;

W. .DUNN, '20; ROBERT W. WARD, '18L; HERMAN A AUGUST,
DEBATORS REPRESENTING MICHIGAN AGAINST NORTHWEST-

ERN, TONIGHT.

LIT COLLEGE EXAMS
TO FOLLOW OLD PLAN
JANUARY 28 SET AS OPENING
DAY FOR TWO WEEK
SCHEDULE
Examinations in the college of Liter-
ature, Science, and the Arts, will be
given this semester the same as usual,
starting Monday, Jan. 28. Examina-
tions in the mornings will be from
9 to 12 o'clock, and in the afternoons'
from 2 to 5 o'clock.
The schedule, which covers a period
of two weeks, follows:
Monday classes; at 8 o'clock,
first Thursday afternoon; at 9
o'clock, second Monday morning;
at 10 odtlock, second Monday
afternoon; at 11 o'clock,' first
Tuesday morning; at 1 o'clock, first
Monday morning; at 2 o'clock, first
Wednesday afternoon; at 3 o'clock,
second Wednesday morning.
-Tuesday classes; at 8 o'clock, first
Saturday morning at 9 o'clock, sec-
ond Tuesday morning; at 10 o'clock,
first Tuesday afternoon; at 11 o'clock,
first Friday morning; at 1 o'clock, sec-.
ond Tuesday afternoon; at 2 o'clock,
first Friday afternoon; at 3 o'clock,
first Wednesday morning.
'Irregular classes; first Monday af-
ternoon, first Thursday morning;
first Saturday afternoon, second Wed-
nesday afternoon, second Thursday af-
ternoon.
The following courses will be ex-
amined at the time announced for
them, and not in accordance with the
foregoing table:
Semetics 13, first Wednesday morn-
ing; French 1 (all sections), first
Thursday morning; Spanish 1 (all
sections), first Thursday morning;
economics 38, first Saturday after-
noon; psychology 7, first Monday af-
ternoon; mathematics 51, second Wed-
nesday afternoon; physics 5, first Wed-
nesday morning; chemistry 28, first
Monday morning; botany 11B, second
Wednesday morning; botany 13, sec-
ond Tuesday afternoon; forestry 3,
first Monday morning.
Copies of the examination schedule
will be on hand at the registrar's of-'
fice in a day or two.
Prof. Dewey Visits Ohio Medic School
Prof. W. A. Dewey of the Homoeo
pathic Medical school has returned
from Columbus, O., where lie has been
inspecting the Homoeopathic school
of the Ohio State university.

VARSITY DEBATERS MEET
NORTHWESTERN TONIGHT
PURPLE SQUAD ARRIVES EARLY
TO AVOID POSSIBLE
TIE-UPS
King Winter may do its worst, Gar-
field may discontinue all except coal
trains, but the twenty-first annual
Central league debate will be held at
8 o'clock this evening in Hill audi-
torium.
Northwestern's squad arrived in this
city yesterday and were kept carefully
guarded by their veteran coach, Prof.
J. L. Lardner, in order that they may
be able to keep their promise to their
university if possible.
Michigan's squad also will spend
a quiet day, with no one to answer
their arguments as to why "compul-
sory arbitration should not .be pro-
vided for all labor controversies in-
volving railroads and other public
service companies."
The personnel of the negative team,
said to be equal to that of the affirm-
ative, which left for Chicago early yes-
terday, where they will debate the
same question with that university in
Mandell hall this evening, is as fol-
lows: Herman A. August, '19, Earl W.
Dunn, '19, and Robert W. Ward, '18L.
Dean Edward H. Krauss, of the Sum-
mer school, will preside at tonight's
debate.
The jidges are: Judge John P.
Manton of Toledo, 0., Attorney A. H.
Miller of the same city, and President
Samuel Dickie of Albion college..
Michigan's band, as has been pre-
viously announced, will be present to
aid the Maize and Blue contestants
in their efforts to secure victory. Ad-
mittance will be free because of the
special provision made by the Regents
governing debates. '
WASHTENAW RED CROSS GIVES
YARN TO ITS MEMBERS ONLY
Distribution of yarn at the Washte-
naw county Red Cross rooms -is be-
ing limited to Ann Arbor members of
the organization. The supply is small,
and it is not definitely known when
a new shipment will arrive.
Few new plans are being made until,
it is learned whether or not Mrs. Louis
P. Hall will continue to act as di-
rector upon her return to this city.
, , , ,, ,, , , ,, *

Washington, Jan. 17--Schools
declared exempted ton~ht from
closing order, under which they
classed as municipal buildings. ]
officials held, may go to 'schools I
ly, not only during the five day
iod but on Monday holidays as
Washington, Jan. 17. - While
storm of protests centered about
capital from the business inter
throughout the nation, Fuel Admi
trator Garfield tonight signed the
der, incorporated yesterday, clo
down manufacturing plants east
from the Mississippi river for fivei
beginning at midnight today and s
ping virtually all, business activ.
every Monday. for. a period of
weeks beginning Jan. 21.
With the full support of' PresiS
Wilson the fuel administrator att:
ed his signature to the order as
senate was preparing to vote 0
resolution which was passed tw
minutes later requesting him to
pone action for five days. Admi
trator Garfield would not commen
the senate action; but it was st
by the fuel administration that
resolution would have no effect t
the order.
Washington Hums
Seldom has Washington seen ads
more stirring activity andcong
'paid little attention to any other
jects during the day. Dr. Garfield
the storm center during the morn
and afternoon when he was ha
before. a' senate committee and ton
when he finally issued the order.
The order as signed and sent
tonight to state fuel administra
for enforcement, contained but a
changes from the form of a sync
given out last night.
Give List
A Supplementary statement is:
with the order embraced 'a list of
industries engaged in imperative
work which will be, exempted I
the order enforcement. In inc
shipyards engaged in naval work,
a few plants turning out products
mediately needed for the army
navy. Among these classes spec
ly exempted is the American Car
Foundry company of Detroit.
Congress was in an uproar from
time it assembled until tonight.
senate resolution was passed afte
senators had denounced the orde
unwise and unnecessary. In the h<
of less than 200, consideration of
resolution, was the subject of a
tinuous debate.
May Appeal Wilson
Tonight it was indicated that
appeal might be made to Presi
Wilson. The suggestion was
heard that the food control bil
which Dr. Garfield's position is
thorized, might be- repealed, but t
appeared little prospects that
might be done. This could hardi
accomplished before the five day
iod was over.
Protests from every legion in
country flooded the fuel admini,
tion, the White House, and ,cong
Lansing, Mich., Jan. 17.-"Bot
order and Mr. Garfield's order go
clared State Fuel Administrator P
den tonight, after an all day stud
the national fuel administration's
day restriction on business.
(Continued on Page Six)

HILL AUDITORIUM

MONDAY, JAN. 21-8 P. M.
Eastern Time

IAN HAY
Il1ustrated War Lectliu"
"JARRYING ON'"

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
.1.
*
*
*

All election blanks for courses 4
in the literary college must be 4.
handed in by 5 o'clock tonight. *
This includes the combined cours- *
es of lit-law and lit-medic. Mili *
-tary training must be elected the *
same as other courses. All stu-
dents taking military training the *
first semester must elect course '
two the second semester. A pen- *
alty of $1 will be imposed for the *
filing of all blanks after today. *
*

Tickets,0c
Wahr's and Sheehan,
State St. Stores

NO RESERVED SEATS

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

*i

-.

G:

Hill
Auditorium

TONIGHT!
Michigan-Northwestern Debate
FREE TO THE PUBLIC

Hill

$:00V

University Band Plays at 7:30

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan