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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PRESS
DAY AND tiIGWI
00 SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1918.

PRICE

i-FOOD

INDUSTRIES

EAST

OF

ISSISSIPPI

CLOSED

FOR

5

c I

892 Rivals Cloud
Annette's Horizon!

U U U IVI L Approximately 892 rivals of Annette
Kellerman will be attending the Uni-.
versity of Michigan if the health pre-
cepts for women advocated by Miss
Alice Evans, director of physical train-
RANTS, CAFES, ing, have the desired results.
ARE CHIEF The plan in brief is this: To those
RERS wiseacres who have discovered that
life, liberty and the pursuit of hap-
;T LUNCH piness, is necessarily dependent upon
. good healthy cards are issued for the
E ITS DOORS purpose of recording prescribed
health measures for the period of 28
t Markets Await days. The aspirant to a perfect card,
ayor Before among other things, must eat three
eCtion regular meals a day on school days,
with nothing between meals but
not be affected by wholesome food in small amounts.
Fuel Administra- This, of course, precludes the midnight
ch as anticipated chafing dish fray, and that delectibie
s issued Tuesday. pie a la mode at 4 o'clock.
usiness will lose Eight consecutive hours of sleep a
f the nine-hour-a- night duiring20 out of the 28 consecu-
mothy ill-ot-a- tive days, with windows raised in care-
iajority will not less disregard of the elements in
r preser hstores spite of grandmother's warning
at hotels, restau- against the poisonous night air, is
ahots, sta-, another requirement. An hour of daily
shops, theaters, exercise, in the gymnasium or out of
stores, and meat doors, is also a requisite. As an add-
ost seriously af- ed inducement to keeping University
plan o business engagements the walk to and from
rpted to the new classes is included under this band.
ter business day A number of the stipulations tend}

CARL G. BRANDT, '20; NEAL D. IR ELAND, '18, AND HERBERT PAR-
ZEN, '19, DEBATERS REPRESENT ING MICHIGAN AT CHICAGO, TO-
MORROW NIGHT.

)
i
1
i
r
la

UNIVERSAL CONSCR IPTION
ADVOCATED BY FOSTER

PRESIDENT
WANTS

OF REED COLLEGE
EVERYBODY IN
SERVICE

isiderable loss ofI

furnishing~

usi-

rn night patrons,
.orced to close all
special permis-
or to be open at
s restaurant, the
ill close its doors
a week,according
tatement. Others
at 11 o'clockand
three have decid-
until definite or-
rom city authori-

;ores and meat markets,
xpect to await an order
.yor to abide by the rule
change plans. When the
reed, the stores will be
to 5 and will have three
es, at 9, 1, and 4. A few
different hours, but this
hold true for the major-
ill meet at 7:30 tonight,
at the city Y. M. C. A.
their hours of business.
op owners have been ask-

to restore the bloom of youth to the
tired and faded college woman. One
athletic honor point is given for card
showing a perfect record. These cards
may be obtained from Miss Evans at
her office in Barbour gymnasium, al-
though it is planned in the near fu-
ture to distribute them among the
dormitories, sororities, and larger
league houses. 'I
ANNUAL PHYSICAL
EXAMS ADVOCATED
That students be required to take
a physical examination atrthe begin-
ning of each school year, and that
a new member be added to the staff
of the University health service to take
charge of a systematic inspection of
the boarding and rooming houses
about the campus, is the substance of
a petition to the Board of Regents by
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director of
the service,
Dr. Forsythe also suggests that stu-
dents be required to attend a series
of health lectures during the semes-
ter. The examinations will make it
possible to treat all students in need'
of attention who would probably not
otherwise report at the health service,
and check any disease which might
spread in the University.
The Board of Regents will probably
take action upon these matters at,
their meeting tomorrow.
"LET'S GO" TRY-OUTS REVEAL
SCARCITY OF FEMININE MEN
Voice and dancing tests for the cast
and dancing trials for the chorus fea-
tured the "Let's Go" try-outs held
last night at the Union. A large num-
ber of men were present, and a few
good voices were found. There is,
however, a dearth of men suited to
take female roles in the cast.
"I am very well pleased with the
talent presented so far," stated Alan
V. Livingston, '18E, general chairman
of the opera, "and the prospects are
very gratifying. The chorus try-
outs handled themselves well in the
dancing tests. In regard to attend-
ance at rehearsals, I wish to state
that absences will count heavily
against the offending parties."
The names of the men surviving
the try-outs and rehearsals will be
published in Friday's Daily.
Homoeeopathic Receipts. on Increase
Receipts from the Homoeopathic
hospital for the year 1917 are over
18 per cent greater than they were

"The time has come, indeed thej
time has gone by, when every individ-
ual in the country should be drafted
into the service so we can win the
war," stated Pres. William T. Foster
of Reed College, Portland, Ore., in a
lecture on "France at War," at 4:15
o'clock yesterday afternoon in Hill
auditorium.
Two regiments of the R. O. T. C.
corps, the headquarters company,
members of the Board of Regents, the
faculty, and hundreds of Ann Arbor
residents were' present. President
Harry B. Hutchins introduced the
speaker.
Refutes Attacks on Red Cross
"Many people believe that enormous
sums of money are squandered in high
salaries of the Red. Cross officials,"'
stated President Foster. "On looking
over the books in France I found that
the average salary was $290 a year.
I also discovered that the people of
America are not sending enough sur-
gical dressings." President Foster
cited many cases of doctors working
behind the lines without sufficient sur-
(Continued on Page Six)
DORM ENTERTAINS
LONELY NEIGHBORS
Folowing action recently taken by
the board of representatives of the
Women's league, Newberry residence
will entertain tomorrow night those
University women in its neighborhood
who live at home or in small groups.
The board, at the suggestion of Dean
Myra B. Jordan, decided to present to
women living in dormitories and other
of the larger groups, the idea of giv-
ing informal affairs for those whose
social life is limited by lack of oppor-
tunity to meet others on the campus.
It was felt-that efforts to give these
women a larger part in campus life
would do much toward promoting and
maintaining a spirit of unity among
women of the University.
MICHIGAN WOMEN MAY SOON
SERVE AS NAVY DRAUGHTSMEN
Michigan women may soon design
ships for the United States navy, and
be eligible for employment as ship
draughtsmen in the navy yard service,
and as mechanical, marine, engine,
and boiler draughtsmen in the navy
department.
This' form of government service
becomes open to them when they are
registered for war service by the
Women's defense committee from
March 18 to 25. Examinations for
these positions will be- given by the
United States Civil Service commis-

VARSITY DEBATING TEAM
GOES TO CHICAGO TODAY
NEGATIVE SIDE TO BE UPHELD
IN CENTRAL LEAGUE
CONTEST
Michigan's squad of Varsity de-
baters who take the negative side of
the question to be argued in the an-
nual Central League debate, leave for
Chicago today, where they debate Chi-
cago tomorrow night. .
The personnel of the negative squad
is Carl G. Brandt, '20, Herbert Par-
zen, '19, and Neal D. Ireland, '18L.
Brandt comes from Ludington and is
a member of the Alpha Nu debating
society.
Parzen Represents Adelphi
Parzen is a Detroit man and is a
member of the Adelphi House of Rep-
resentatives. Last year he was a
member of the championship Adelphi
cup debate team.
Ireland, coming from Florence, Kan-
sas, is the only man with previous
debating experience, and is president
of the Michigan Oratorical associa-
tion. He was captain of the team that
beat Illinois in 1917. Besides this ex-
perience he has the honor of being
the state peace orator of the Kansas
State Normal university, where he
took his first two years of literary
work.
NAV AL MILITIAMEN
MEET IN REUNION
The first annual meeting of the first
military organization to be sent from
the campus was held at Waukegan,
Ill., last Thursday night, thirteen men
from the original two units sent last
spring getting together in a banquet
followed by a theater party and in-
formal meeting. . The remaining men
of the units are scattered to variot
points in the service, some continental
and some afloat.
The singing of Michigan songs was
a part of the program. Resolutions
were passed and letters sent to the
University authorities and the men
at the naval rifle ranges at Wakefield,
Mass., Norfolk, Va., Virginia Beach,
Va., Annapolis, Md., and Camp Logan,
Ill.
Another reunion has been arranged
for the night of Feb. 24, at the LaSalle
hotel in Chicago. Attempts are being
made to have representatives from the
faculty and student body attend.
EMMA GOLDMAN TO LECTURE
AT ANN ARBOR AS SCHEDULED
Emma Goldman will come to Ann
Arbor for the two lectures on Satur-
day as scheduled. According to a let-
ter received here today from Detroit,
where she is giving a.series of talks,
she has 30 days of grace after the
court sentence before being commit-
ted to jail. She declares that news-
paper reports of her immediate in-
carceration are without foundation.

iand To Enroll
In R. O.T. C.
Michigan's famous band will enroll
in the headquarters company of the R.
O. T. C. corps today, according to a
vote taken by the members last night.
Regulation R. O. T. C. uniforms will
be furnished to the band, and a ma-
jority of the musicians will be meas-
ured this afternoon. No definite word
was given out last night as to the
probability of transforming the Var-
sity band into a military organiza-
tion. At the present time the men
will play for both organizations. In
case there are any vacancies in the
ranks additional men will be drawn
from the two military companies.
More than 25 buglers are now en-
rolled in the headquarters company,
although the men now drill with the
regiments. Efforts are being made to
increase the number to 32.
GEORGE WASHINGTON PARTY
AND CREASE DANCE COMBINED
The Crease Dance, annual senior
law affair, will be given this year on
Friday night, February 22, at the Un-
ion. The dance will be a combination
of the customary George Washington
party and Senior Crease.
The affair may be open to the cam-
pus in general owing to the small
number of law students in school. The
committee is seriously considering
other changes in order to reduce ex-
penses.
ORCHESTRA GIVES
POETIC RENDITIONS
Applause, enthusiastic and unre-
strained, greeted Walter Damrosch
and his New York Symphony orches-
tra of, 90 pieces, from the opening
.strains of the official version of "The
"Star Spangled Banner" -to the final
burst of silver sound in the "Rouman-
ian Rhaposdy" by Ensco, the last
number on the program.
The rendering of the program was
systematic and well balanced, all of
the numbers appearing being the work
of living composers, except the first,
the overture from "Oberon" by Weber.
Mr. Damrosch's personality as a con-
ductor is imposing, the orchestra of
90 men following his baton with every
note perfectly formed, as it swings
from a flowing line in the more poetic
passages to a sharply decisive beat
which brings out the climax of the
numbers with perfection.
The peculiar buzzing humming note
of the "Song of the Mosquito" by Lia-
dow, with the drone carried by the
bass viols, suggestive of a drowsy in-
sect, took the audience by storm, and
resulted in such applause that Mr.
Damrosch encored the number. An-
other number especially fantastic was
the Chinese music in the "Lasideron-
nette, Empress of the Statuettes," by
Ravel. The mystery of the Orient was
apparent here, and the fine use of
tomtoms and the veiled song of the
violins added a tone picture of the
land of temples and squat Chinese
idols. The closing number, executed
with a brilliance and dash expressive
of the Roumanian people in their
dances, was dramatic in the extreme.
The final movement, played after a
sharp full stop of the orchestra, add-
ed magnificent force to the program.
Mr. Damrosch, when interviewed af-
ter the concert, expressed his appre-
ciation of the acoustic qualities of

Hill auditorium, "It is the noblest
and grandest place I have ever played
in during my musical career." "The
audience was so appreciative and sym-
pathetic that it added greatly to the
pleasure of my work," stated Mr.
Damrosch.
The orchestra is making a 10 day
tour, going from Ann Arbor to Dayton,
Ohio, The service flag hung over the
ate Aurine the concert with ix

DA.
START TOMO
I
-MEET COA1
LOUSIANA AND MIN
CLUDED INORD
STATES I[]
SHOPS SHUT MO]
FOR. 10 WEE]
Banks and Trust Comp
fected; Plan Meets A
President

BULLETIN
Lansing, Jan. 16.-State Fue
ministrator Prudden declined t
to discuss the order closing no
ducing food plants in 28 stat(
eluding Michigan, for a period
da ys beginning tomorrow. He i
to wait until he had received a
cial copy of the order.
Washington; Jan. 16.- In a d
order to-meet the coal famine Fu
ministrator Garfield tonight di
that beginning Friday morning
facturing plants east of the Mis,
pi river and in the states of Min:
and Louisiana, except those p:
ing food, shall close down for -
iod of five days. During the n
weeks they shall close on Mc
and holidays.
Coal to Go to Railroads
In the period designated, coa
go only to railroads, househoulds
lic utilities, ships' bunkers, cr
ments, naval stations and public
ings. -
Office buildings may be heater
lug the five day period to pi
freezing, but on Mondays and ho
they must be closed.
Status of Newspapers
Concerningrnewspapershthe
says: Printers or publishers of
papers may burn fuel as usuE
cepting on every Monday from
21 to March -2.5, on which day
legal holidays they may burn f
such an extent as is necessary tc
the editions as such papers cust
ily issue. Where papers do not
an issue on a holiday, they are p
ted to issue one edition on the f
ing Monday.
The theaters will be requirE
close on the 10 Mondays but no
ing the five days beginning Frid
Under the order during the 10
period, Mondays will be holiday
as Sundays, and stores and shot
be closed.
Fuel Burned Where Necess
In this connection the o
provides:
On each Monday begin:
Jan. 21, and continuing up to
including Monday, March 25
fuel shall be burned, excep
such an extent as is essentia
prevent injury from freezing.
Necessary heat may be maint
ed in wholesale or retail stc
business houses or buildings
lng food until 12 o'clock nc
and may be maintained throe
out the day and night in sty

st Uonserve
ve to close every
y to conserve the
d in their heating.
open they must
This applies to

ges will also be hit because
ours are especially long. Taxi-
upanies will probably not be in-
in the order, although they are
cifically exempted.
ising of Schools Reported
schools in the state may beI
this week by a second order
Prudden, according to reports
d yesterday, The fuel used to
em will be turned over to needy
s. It may be' possible that the
gs will be kept open and heat-
helter people who are without
rhe order is expected within a

may be

On the above
no fuel shall
purpose of i
buildings in w
,on those days.
No fuel shall

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