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January 15, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IT
BE

4a

AL COMPANIES TO
FORMED FOR DELIN-
QUENT MEN

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widths

No credit for work in the R. 0. T.
C. course will be given to the cadets
unless all unexcused absences are
made-up, and the attendance record is
perfect, announced Lieut. George C.
Mullen yesterday afternoon.
It is absolutely imperative that the
students continue military training if
once enrolled in the course. A stu-
dent who has dropped a course and
has not received recognition from the
commandant that such is the case, will
not receive a degree from the Univer-
sity, although the regular University
credits- will be granted.
All unexcused absences for this
semester must be made up before the
examinations before credit can be giv-
en for the military work. The make-
up work can be done next semester
only by special permission from C. F.

The department of physical edu-
cation of the University of Chicago
has recently made some startling dis-
closures concerning the health and
physical fitness of the students. Over
25 per cent of the freshmen wear
glasses, and 15 per cent ought to wear
tlem. Over 10 per cent need the ser-
vices of a dentist. Vaccination for
small pox is decreasing and the dis-
ease is spreading correspondingl[.
Both Harvard and Yale have for the
past 25 years conducted their athletic
training along wrong lines according
to Dr. D. A. Sargent, who is an alum-
nus of Yale and director .of physical
education at Harvard. He said that
the colleges have had athletics for
only a few instead of letting every-
one into the game, and that the war
has shown us that all our men should
be physically fit,.
All intercollegiate relations between
Purdue university and the University
of Indiana have been severed and all
athletic and other obligations have
been cancelled.
Two masked robbers broke into the
Minnesota Union lunch room Dec. 19
just as the cash was being counted
and after covering the cashier and
the kitchen help made off with $135
in cash.
Through the efforts of the student
council of McGill a large skating rink
is soon to be placed at the disposal
of the students.
The athletic council of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania has reduced its
football schedule from the usual elev-
en contests to eight as a war-time
measure.

5YM'1T~*O S :YLE
P5SS51I.!G TH U-,LtTY
FOUND IN ALL
2 fcrY57J
EARL & WIL,.N lar
7TfOY'S BEST PPOOUC7

I

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SKATES and SHOES
for all kinds of skating
HOCKEY SUPPLIES
(f~9SNOW SHOES
SKIS
SWEATERS
The Spalding line affords you the
widest range of selection with a guar-
antee that every article will give Satis-
faction and service.
Catalogue on request.

weel

-organization is pro-
,nd will be complet-
lents who have good
s and have applied
tly will be placed in
[1 thus be afforded
ty to secure more
anced training.mr
ies will be compos-
who are irregular in
will also be a spec-
mpany for the mem-
'ent companies who

A. G. SPALDING &
211-217 South Stat
CHICAGO'

I

cadets, who en-
ut dropped out,
. A special com-
inted to consid-
the student pre-
ument, the com-

EMMA GOLDMAN TO LECTURE
ON BOLSHEVIKI, SATURDAY
Enroute to prison Miss Emma Gold-
man will stop in Ann Arbor and will
lecture both iafternoon and evening,
Saturday, Jan. 19, in the Woodman
hall.
Miss Goldman will speak on "Wom-
en Martyrs of -Russia," at 2 o'clock

mittee has been ap
er every case, and
sents a convincinga
mittee will pass up,

For the students who have missed
a great number of drill, lecture and
gymnastic work, and cannot possibly
make up the required time, will lose
the semester's military training cred-
it. Every cadet is this class will have
to start anew the second semester.

The University of Wiscons
club has just passed its twe
anniversary.

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e

A course in Navigation, to be known
as Astronomy 22 will be offered in the
department of Astronomy of the Uni-
versity during the second semester at'
9 o'clock Monday, Wednesday, and Fri-
day, room 109 Tappan hall, with a
laboratory period from 1 to 4 o'clock
on Tuesdays at the Observatory.
Students who complete this course
in Navigation will be ready for the ex-
aminations in this subject for ensigna
in the Naval Reserves. Those with
sufficient sea experience will be eligi-
ble with the graduates of the free
navigation schools, of simiilar exper-
ience for an officer's license in the new
merchant marine. All candidates for
a desk officer's berth must be more
than 19 years old, must have good
color sense and visual acuracy, and
must pass the local inspector's exam-
ination in Navigation. Students with-
out sea experience, who take the work
in this course will be eligible for an
officer's license after two years desk
training on an ocean steamship.
The course will include the princi-
ples of piloting, dead reckoning, and
nautical astronomy with appropriate
observatory practice, also the rules
of the road at sea, principles of gen-
eral seamanship, and signalling ac-
cording to the International code. It
is important that those electing this
course should have preparation
in trignometry and the use of
logarithms. Four hours' credit
will be allowed for the comple-
tion of the semester's work. For ad-
ditional information students may con-
sult Professor R. H. Curtis at the Ob-
servatory from 2:30 to 4:30 on Tues-
day and Thursday afternoons, or at
other times by appointment.
FUEL SHORTAGE IN CITY
CONTINUES TO GROW WORSE
(Continued from Page One)
M. C. A. may close this week. The
Michigan Union is cutting down its
daily allotment in an attempt to make
its supply last the remainder of the
winter. The Orpheum theater is clos-
ed three days weekly and stores are
taking up the movement. Jewelry,
hardware, dry goods, music, and furn-
iture stores have agreed to close at 5
o'clock every day and at 9 o'clock

The senior men of the Ohio State '
University votedunanimously to, work
from eight to five o'clock six dys a
week for the rest of the semester in
order that they may graduate early.
This is the result of the faculty de-
cision that men called in the draft
before June should not be given their
degree unless they had completed the
required amount of work.
The Cornell Athletic association has
decided to drop freshman baseball
next spring because of the decision of
the faculty to make Saturdays in
April 'drill days in preparation for
the annual inspection.
RHETORIC COURSE OMITTED IN
ANNOUNCEMENT WILL BE GIVEN
Candidates for Class Will be Limited;
Should Report to Mr.
Cowden
A course known as Rhetoric 18, or
junior composition, will be given by
Mr. Cowden the second semester, in
room 105, West hall, Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 10 o'clock.
The course is intended to give train-
ing in the writing and revision of
compositions. The student will be ex-
pected to submit five or six manu-
scripts during the semester. These
manuscripts are' to be carefully re-
vised, the work of revision continu-
ing until the student has made his
composition as nearly perfect as his
talents permit.
It is open to juniors who have had
course three or four in rhetoric and
will be limited to 20 students. All
those who wish to take the course
should consult with the instructor be-
fore making their elections.
COMMUNICATION WITH OUT-
SIDE WORLD IS RESTORED

Cl

so ea

horus tryouts and
ld at 7:30 o'clock
the Union.
Ill; May Resign
?ccording to tele-
today Count von
n imperial chan-
bably will resign

(Continued from Page
because of the lack of fuel
serious cases have been re
the police. Up-state cities
ging themselves out of the-
attempting to restore trafi
'Grand Trunk lines are pa
hampered by snow. Reporti
parts of the state and imm
cinity show that Ann Arboi
feel the storm as much
cities.

ew

' did not
as other

wh

Streets Still Blocked
City streets are still blocked by
huge drifts and automobiles are hav-
ing difficulty in navigating. Taxicabs
are still doing heavy service, although
the street cars are again in operation.
Plows are being used on all the side-
walks and gangs of men are attempt-
ing to clean some parts of the streets.
Drivers of machines should use cau-
tion as the drifts make it practically

11

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