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January 13, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I

AIV A

I

ASSOCIA
Z4U &1 DAY ATID G
SER VI('

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 1918.

PRICE '

_ ,.

*.

PER'S
LOVES

"GLASS"
TO BE GLUE

COL AR[RIVA RELIEVES
LOCLFUL SITUTION

of "Loaded"rBreakfast Foods
at Camp Are Ex-
ploded
Custer, Mich., Jan. 12.-Ru-
the effect that ground glass
n placed in breakfast foods,

DELIVERIES MADE MONDAY; NO
SUFFERING DESPITE BLIZ-
ZARD
A carload of coal arrived in the city

Custer, by enemy pro- yesterday and was turned over to the

pagandists was exploded when di-
visional officers found that the alleg-
ed glass was particles of glue which
fell into the containers when a trans-
fer of the foodstuffs was made from
large to small packages.
This report originated in Chicago
and investigation was immediately or-
dered here, The hardened glue asi
found by the officers, greatly resem-
ble small pieces of glass. The divis-
ion surgeon stated that no danger
would develop in the use of the food
as the glue was pure and easily di-
gested.
Eighteen military police were this
noon stationed in front of a like num-
ber of restaurants and ice cream par-
lors in Battle Creek to prevent sol-
diers from patronizing these places
because the proprietors refused to
clean up and comply with the strict
sanitary laws required by the war de-

etion followson the heels of
ion of Battle Creek by repre-
s of Michigan State Board of
Both civil and military of-
gree that all places closed to
have had ample time to clean
ving the inspection. The mil-
lice will not interfere with
onage of civilians but an "M.
ding in front of a restaurant
be a very good advertise-

ds an enviable place
onments in its health
ig to division officers.
ding Dec. 21, it was
superceded on the
eade and Upton, re-

police department by Fuel Administra-
tor Beal for distribution among houses
whose supply is entirely exhausted.
Delivery of the carload will be begun
Monday.
Conditions yesterday were much bet-
ter than they have been for several
days, regardless of the exceptionally
low temperature. No serious cases of
fuel famine were reported at police
headquarters and only one case was
reported to Mr. John Shadford, poor
commissioner. This was attended to
immediately. The poor commission
has its own supply of coal and is de-
livering small lots, when necessary,
in city-owned wagons.
Linited Orders Accepted .
The police department will take
orders for half-ton lots to be delivere
tomorrow, according to Acting Chief
of Police O'Brien. Orders for coal are
increasing daily but this shipment wi
better conditions. The price being
charged is $4.75 per half ton.
The Washtenaw Gas company is tak-
ing orders for coke to the amount of
30 tons each day. Limited amounts are
being allowed each applicant at the
price of $10 per ton. There is a wait-
ing line each morning made up of
persons trying to get deliveries.
Factory Supply Decreasing
Factories are feeling the shortage
again. The Gas company has a supply
that will last no longer than three
weeks. The company is expecting an
additional shipment but requires a
large amount.
PRES. HUTCHINS TO
SPEAK AT MIXER
President Harry B. Hutchins will
speak at the mixer to be held from
3 to 5 o'clock this afternoon at the
Uion. His talk will be informal. A
vocal solo by Mr. James Hamilton,
of the School of Music, with piano
accompaniment by Mr. Earl V. Moore,
will be the musical feature of the af-
ternoon. "Jazz" will also occupy a
place on the program.
The Rotary club and the army
stores students are to be present at
the mixer, which the committee plans
to make one of the most successful
of the season. Faculty members and
business men are extended a cordial
invitation to attend, and good cheer
and warmth are promised for all.
The committee is as follows: Bruce
Swaney, '18, A. L. Kirkpatrick, '18, C.
C. Andrews, '18, Herbert Gustin, '18,
Edwin Snyder, '19, D. R. Lasier, '21E,
Fred Gariepy, '18, Walter S. Riess, '20,
Mark K. Ehlbert, '20, William H.
Granse, '19, Harold W. Collins, '18E,
G. G. Whitney, '20E, Stewart Doolit-
tIe, '20, Carl Johnson, '20, Joseph Brod-
erick, '19; Alan V. Livingston, '18E,
Raymond Beardsley, '19, and E. G.
Dudley Jr.; '18E.
SECRETARY LANSING DECLARES
WAR AIMS MUST BE ACHIEVED

CAMP FUNSTON'S ROBBER
FOUND TO__BE. CAPTIN
CAPT. L. R. WISLER COMMITS SUI-
CIDE AFTER IDENTIFICATION
BY SURVIVOR
Camp Funston,, Kan., Jan. 12.-Iden-
tification today of Capt. Lewis R.
Whisler bytKarney Wornall, the only
survivor of five men who were attack-
ed y an army captain bent upon rob-
bery of the camp bank last night, as
the man who had perpetrated tie
crime and the captain's subsequent
death by suicide has convinced army
authorities here that the search for
the slayer is ended.
Commits Suicide
Captain Whisler killed himself by
firing two bullets from an army rifle
into his head. His death came after
Wornall bad recovered consciousness
at the hospital and told the officers
the story of the tragedy in which the
captain had killed with an axe four
men, including Vive-president Wint-
ers of the Federal Reserve bank of
Kansas City, a friend of the captain's.
Kills Helpless Men
Wornall describing the tragedy told
of a man who came to the door of
the bank about 8:30 o'clock last night
and rapped insistently. He was ad-
mitted and covered the five men with
his revolver. He forced Wornall to'
tie the hands of the four men, after-'
ward he tied Wornall's hands. The
man then proceeded to loot the bank
safe and had reached the door when'
Winters said to Wornall: "You rec-
ognize him, don't you?" Wornall ans-
wered that he did.
The murdered turned to Winters and
said: "You know me, do you?" "I
sure do," was Winters' reply.
Wornall says at this point the man
hesitated and then suddenly leaped at
them swinging his axe. He struck
the helpless men down one by one.
48 MEN SURVIVE
OPERA TRYOUTS

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* * * * * * * * * * *
INFORMAL RELATIONS M
BEGUN WITH LENINE
London, Jan. 12.-The British
government has decided to estab-
lish informal relations with Maxim
Litvinoff. who was appointed by
the Russian government as Bol-
sheviki representative in London.
This step, it is said, has been tak-
en with a view of obtaining in-
formation with regard to condi-
tions in Russia.
According to' a Russian stu-
dent in the University, the ap-
pointment of Litvinoff was clever-
ly brought about by Premier Leon.
Trotzky of the Bolsheviki govern-
ment in order to bring about the
former's release after an arrest in
London. The arrest was brought
about at a time when conditions'
were much strained between the
British and the Bolsheviki.

WORSTBLIZZARD IN YEARS HITS A
ARBOR DEMORALIZIN6 TRAFFIC

OUTSIDE; COAL SHIPMEIH

dI

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Railroad
By

(Chas.* B Osius,
Gripped in the winds
terrific blizzard Ann Arb

* ern Michigan have exper

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lRTH WESTERN-MICHIGAN
DEBATE HELD HERE FRIDAY
'o Women On Negative Teams;
Band To Appear Fo'r Last Time
This Semester
'Resolved that compulsory arbitra-
n be provided for all disputes on
lways and other public service in-
stries" will be the question debated
the annual Chicago-Northwestern-
chigan meet Friday evening, Jan.
F'he judges for the contest will be
m states outside Michigan and Ill-
is, where the competing schools
located. The chairman for the
ning will be some state official off
chigan.,
Northwestern, which -debates here,
s a woman on the negative team
ich debates Chicago at Northwes-
n. Chicago also has one woman on
r negative team which debates Mich-
n at Chicago.
:he band will be present at the de-
e for last appearance this semes-

LOWEST TEMPERATUR
ED AT 13.2 BELOW 2
OBSERVATOR'
DELIVERY OF MA
GREATLY HI

Forty-eight men have survived the{
first tryouts for the chorus of "Let's
Go," the coming Union opera. The
names follow:
W. W. Hinshaw, '20, H. Anderson,
'20, S. E. Doolittle, '20, E. L. Spana-
gel, '19E, C. D. Hipp, '20L, R. D. Smith,
'20, C. A. Towler, '18, H. C. Smith, '20,
H. W. Weeks, '21, F. C. Carew, '20,E,
W. R. Frazer, '20E, P. J. Van Boven,
'20, R. P. Douglass, '20, H. R. Slus-
ser, '20, C. B. Rathburn, '18D, G. P.
Schafer, '20E, M. E. Lane, '20E, W. S.
Trowbridge, '20E'
V. A. Rowley, '20, A. P. Cook, '21,
C, H. Wilmot, '19, W. Beatty, '19, W.
F. Pellow, '20L, W. Beatty, '19, W.
J. Quakenbush, '20, C. G. Patterson,
'20, J. W. Bailey, '20, C. R. Ford, '20E,
S. A. Lambers, '20L, N. W. Wassman,
'20L, H. M. Kiefer, '19A, R. F. Tillot-
son, '21, J. S. Bing, '20, G. R. Byrne,
'19, J. F. Bulmer, '18D, H. S. True-
man, '19, M. H. Rorick, '20, R. E. Mon-
roe, '19, I. T. Sanborn, '20, P. A.
Shinkman, '20, W. A. Eldridge, '19,
L. F. Kuijala, '19, J. S. Wolfstein,, '19,
H. R. Cossitt, '19, P. D. Quarry, '19,
R. Hummer, '19, C. Bishop, '19, and R.
Cowden, '19.
ADMINISTRATION ORDERS
COAL TO BE MOVED FIRST

System Entirely
Storm With No R
In Sight

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
MANY APPLY FOR
TELEGRAPH COURSE
Western Union Manager Expects Ar-
rival of Instruments in a Few
Days_
A number of applications for the
telegraph course to be conducted by
Mr. H. C. Baumgardner, Western Un-
ion manager, were received at the Mich-
igan Union yesterday, regardless of the
unfavorable weather. Several wom-
en have also enrolled at the city Y.
IV. C. A.
Mr. Baumgardner has ordered the
instruments and they are expected to
arrive within a few days. They will
be installed as soon as a permanent
laboratory room can be secured. The
enrollment' list will remain open for
about a week, unless the maximum
number of 100 applicants sign up be-
fore that time has elapsed.
Arrangements are being made
whereby men of draft age may be
given permission by their draft boards
to take the course instead of being
sent to training camps immediately.
Men enrolled in the course may enlist.
in the army before beginning the work
or they can enroll after its comple-
tion. The commercial companies and
railroads will also offer positions to
graduates of the course. Informa-
tion can be secured at the Union or
from Mr. Baumgardner.

many years, all traffic ceas
yesterday morning and rema:
alyzed throughout-the day an
Trains and electric cars we
bound and the systems all
lines were completely den
Michigan Central train No. 1
arrive here at 9:45 Friday nig
up at the depot 'at 2:30 yest
ternoon. This was the only
riving from the West all da
three trains arrived from t
The Ann Arbor railroad cane
trains due yesterday.
Interurbans Stalled
Interurban cars which a
to run between this city an:
were stalled and only two si
in reaching Ann Arbor. Both
were more than five hours -la
car that was blockaded for
hours and could not be he
cause of the wind, was force
charge its passengers so .t
could be kept warm in a nei
farmhouse. The passenge
served a hot meal by the farm
ily. No cars have attempted
west of here.
Communication Difficui
Communication by telegra
somewhat hindered by the' f
several main lines. The Pos
graph company could not sen
ceive messages from cities
Buffalo and Pittsburg. The
Union linesto Chicago were
condition but messages wer(
through after some delay. ThE
Edison company's wires were
fected.
Up-State Railroads Bloc
Railroads north of Detroit
ther up state were hopelessly
according to advices receiv
Port Huron. The coal being
from that city is tied up and
be dispatched for several da;
train of two or three cars had
motives attempting to get it o
station. All attempts were un
ful and traffic remained at
still. Lines north of Port Hu
in even worse condition. T
and telegraph wires were n
fected up state than in this vi
Mails Delayed
The mails were delayed a
four arrived at the local postol
ing the day. Only one deliv
attempted at 11:30 o'clock. S(
riers did- not cover their rou
five o'clock because of tl
drifts. Rural deliveries were n
Farmers .on the various rura
telephoned the postmaster tc
against sending outcariers
country because the roads w
passible.

DS CITY OFFICIALS
UILTY OF CONSPIRACY
Jan. 12-Former Chief of
y, a detective and a saloon
re found not guilty by a
t of .charges of conspira-
ct illegal resort. - The jury
e hours before arriving at
The trial began Oct. 15,

It was charged that the defendants
llected money for permitting viola-
ns of the law relating to gambling,l
'ostution, and saloons.
MION SERVICE POSTPONED
ON ACCOUNT OF WEATHER
Union services scheduled for to-
ght have been postponed one week,
. account of weather conditions. Dr.
o M. Franklin of Detroit will then
ve his talk on "The Times and Their

New York, Jan. 12.-Secretary of
State Lansing, speaking here tonight
before the New York State Bar asso-
ciation, declared that until the war
aims outlined by President Wilson are
accepted by the Prussian government
the war must go on. "We are in this
war as a republic to the end," he de-
clared.
Mr. Lansing's address was regarded
as a reply to the comments in German
papers upon President Wilson's ad-
dress to congress. He declared the
aims we seek must be achieved and
will be.
Prof. Pollock to Address Unitarians
Prof. James B. Pollock of the botany
department, will be the speaker to-
night at the meeting of the Students'
society of the Unitarian church at 6:30
o'clock in the church parlors at the
corner of State and Huron streets.
His subject will be "Heredity and Mor-
al Responsibility." The nublic is cord-

Washington, Jan. 12.-The railroad
administration today met the storm
conditions prevailing throughout the
country with instructions to railroads
to move coal first wherever possible
and redouble energies to keep locomo-
tives in running order.
Assistant Director Smith for eastern
lines reported that meagre advices-
from the west indicated the continu-
ance of passenger service depended
upon abatement of the storm tonight.
A number of passenger trains were
reported stalled tonight.
FLAG TO CONTAIN GOLD STAR
FOR MEMBER WHO LOST LIFE
A service flag containing 30 stars
will be presented to the First Method-
ist church-by the women of the church
at the services at 10:30 o'clock this
morning. The flag will contain one
gold star for a member of the church
who has given his life in the ser-
Va~o 'N,

MORE ESSAYS WANTED
IN HISTORICAL CONTEST
Communication to President Hutchins
States Competition Will Stim-
ulate Thinking
Greater response of the part of
Michigan students in engaging in the
prize essay contest on "Why the Unit-
ed States is at War" is the desire of
George N. Fuller, secretary of the
Michigan historical commission, in a
recent communication to President
Harry B. Hutchins.
A number of students have already
submitted essays, but a larger number
is desired. The purpose of the contest
is more than the writing of an essay,
it concerns itself to stimulating think-
ing upon this mighty issue, and to
lead from thinking to action.
In the letter Mr. Fuller says: "These
young people, many of whom may be
called into action before the end of
the war, should be lead so as to real-
ize the terrible crisis that has been
reached in the world's affairs, that
they will tutn every ounce of energy,
through their studies and in other
ways, to the end of winning this war,

Taxicabs had g
ting through the
a few were kept
ess was especial
could not take c,
the offices. Stre

ages

gs Course To4
ass standard surf
is to begin at

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