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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 11, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

L NEWS

Fabries

lens are hard to get. But despite
tment of all-wool fabrics in the
-ns for men's stylish clothes are on
an event you can't afford to over-

0 buiTs a good suit
EXTRA

that is truly;

COLM
STREET

em'in Economy
Our Difference
Price Others oi l5Rolls
.Oc 1ic 25c
............04c ea. 05c ea. 90c
e in price.......................... T
LMS WITH US AND SAVE MONEY
'inted half day to day sooner than others.
de Floral Shop
in & r iu nF nI i21 ET7 1u .

for Party and Group Pictures

Il

L L

COLORS
One, Two or Three Stars.
r and Solid Gold.

NICKELS ARCADE

111dW11UH~L UU105e10idU11
TO GIVE ESSAY PRiZES
WILL GIVE FOUR $50 REWARDS
FOR REST ARTICLES ON "WilY
U. S. IS AT WAR"
The Michigan historical commission
has set aside the sum of $200 to be ex-
pended in four prizes of $50 each, to
four groups of competitors in educa-
tional institutions of Michigan, for the
best essays on the subject "Why the
United States is at War."
Those eligible are: Teachers in
public high schools and elementary
schools, students in normal colleges
and normal schools, students in the
University of Michigan, Michigan Agri-
cultural college, Michigan College of
Mines, and the University of Detroit;
and students in all other Michigan col-
leges and schools not included in the
above.
President Hutchins One of Judges
The judges are to be President
Harry B. Hutchins of the University
of Michigan, President Kedzie, of M.
A. C., President McNair, Michigan Col-
lege of Mines, President McKinney,
Ypsilanti Normal, Hon. Fred L. Keel-
er, Rt. Rev. E. A. O'Brien, and Pro-
fessor VanTyne, president of the so-
ciety.
The method of treatment must be
primarily historical. The essays
should bring to bear on the subject
all, of the essential facts of recent or
remote history relative thereto. They
must be amply fortified with refer-
ences for all important statements,
and be accompanied with a biblio-
graphy of the works consulted. As
all competitors may not have equally
easy access to large libraries, stress
will be laid, in awarding prizes, upon
the degree of thoroughness and intel-
ligence with which the available ma-
terial has been used.
Applications Must Be In By Feb. 1
In order to enter the contest, appli-
cation must reach the secretary of the
Michigan historical commission, Lan-
sing, on or before Feb. 1, 1918. The
secretary will assign to each- appli-
cant a number, which will be sealed
at the office of the commissioni until
after the contest. Essays should be
signed only with this number.
All essays must be in the hands of
the commission before April 30, 1918.
Announcement of winners will be
made as soon as possible.
Interesinug Bits
Employment was secured for 9,703.
persons by state employment agen-
cies during December.
Great Britain has 1,240,000 women
employed throughout the realm. This
is an increase of 38 per cent over the
number employed before the war.
The philosophical faculty of Con-
stantinople has proposed Nicholai Le-
nine of the Russian Bolsheviki for the
Nobel peace prize.
Major General Goethals has been
designated director of transportation
hnd storage of the -war department.
Germans are paying 56 cents a
pound for sugar and $2.25 a pound for
butter.
Kentucky horsemen have pledged
$300,000 to the American Red Cross.
The money is to be raised during the
racing season of 1918.

An American tree known as the
shea is beginning to attract commer-
cial attention, for it supplies not only'
nuts but butter also.
Food Administrator Hoover has an-
nounced that the government will con-
trol the binder twine output of the
country during the 1918 season, but
the price will be higher.
Dr. Henry Van Dyke, former United
States minister to the Netherlands,
has been commissioned a chaplin in
the naval reserves with the rank of
lieutenant commander.
Craftsmen Club Will Hold Meeting
The Craftsmen club wil hold a meet-
ing at 7:30 Saturday night at which
pins will be given new members.

APPLICATIONS FOR ENGINEERING
CORPS WILL BE SENT AWAY
SU'NDAY
All applications for the Engineers'
reserve corps will be sent to Wash-
ington on Sunday. Jan. 13. Students
in the engineering college, and in the
chemistry department are eligible pro-
viding they satisfy the conditions set
forth by the war department.
The last meeting of the committee'
for the consideration of applications
will be held Saturday afternoon, Jan.
12.
Students who have applied for the
recommendation of the faculty for this
corps- and who do not know the decis-
ions concerning them, or who have
been approved but have not filed their
government applications should con-
sult with the secretary's office not
later than Saturday noon, Jan. 12.
GOVERNMENT PLANS
ON WOOD FOR FUEL

Home Laundry

SATUERDY LAST CHANC
TO ENROLL FOR RESEI

218 E Huron Street

WE ASK A TRIAL

p

I E

IH. Frothingham, '14,. To. Have
Charge of Situation and Control
In Mlichigan

( 7
SENIORS
Arrange Your Sitting for the
Michiganensit
.Photos NO'

,

5

BRav1^ola
C im-Carne

It Behoove

take up the usual
unch - but what
. serve to drink
c host nd hostess have been
dAyves that- same question-es-
.ever the o4asion happens to
ose cozy little after-theatre or
imes" parties. Now, there is

F. H. Frothingham, '14, of the Wash-
ington office of the United States for-
estry service, is in Ann Arbor to con-
fer with the forestry department fac-
alty on methods of supplying Michi-
gan people with wood for fuel next
winter. He has been given charge of
that phase of the fuel situation in
Michigan by the federal government
and will make his headquarters in
Lansing.
The government is looking forward
to another possible coal, scarcity
next winter and is preparing to meet
it by sending foresters to each state
to arrange for a supply of wood for
fuel, according to Prof. L. J. Young
of the forestry department. Frothing-
ham intends to urge the farmers own-
ing woodlots to cut wood this winter
as they do not have the time during
the rest of the year and it is neces-
sary for the wood to dry several
months before it makes the best fuel.
He will appoint assistants in each
section of the state to supervise the
cutting in order to have it done scien-
tifically and not have the woodlots
destroyed. Members of the forestry
faculty will be appointed to take
charge of the work in this. vicinity.
The plan is to have the farmers draw
the wood to the nearest city
to avoid railroad -tie-ups. Profes-
sor Young, said yesterday. that
there is enough wood within
15 or 20 miles of Ann Arbor to supply
this city indefinitely and that it
would improve the wooded sections if
some of the trees were cut.
ENGINEER RESERVE-
OPEN TO CHEMISTS
Prof. William G. Smeaton to Have
Charge of Formation of Local
Corps
Chemistry students taking courses
leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science are eligible for the engineers
reserve corps according to information
received from Washington yesterday
by the chemistry department. This
places them on the same footing as the
engineers who under the late ruling
are not drafted if they enroll in the
corps.
Between 40 and 50 men in the local
college are affected by the ruling. Any
of these who desire to take advantage
of it are asked to confer with Prof.
William G. Smeaton, room 474 Chem-
istry building, between the hours of
9"to 10 o'clock, 11 to 12 o'clock, or 3
to 6 o'clock.
The action at Washington comes as
a result of agitation by chemists, in
which the University had a part. The
men in the corps will be employed
chiefly in munition plants.
Convict HamburgAnierican Officers
New York, Jan. 10.-Conviction of
four officials of the Hamburg-Ameri-
can line of violating the customs laws
by, sending supplies to German cruis-
ers early in the war was affirmed by
the United States circuit court of ap-
peals here.
Through a system of false manifests
the government contended the steam-
ship officials concealed the destina-
tions of outgoing ships which they had
chartered.
Foresters Inspect Airplane Wood
W. C. Laubengauer, ,14, C. . Sae-
brook, '17, and C. W. Garland, ex-'15.
former students of the forestry de-
partment, are inspecting wood for the
manufacture of "airplanes at a gov-
ernment plant at Dayton, Ohio.

"THERE'S A DIFFERENCE"
Your account handled monthly if you desire.

WHAT'S GOING ON r
war i

'C
'1

Hooverizing on your laundry does not m
be washed less frequently. But it does mear
should be done properly so as to prolong its
That's the HOME LAUNDRY'S me
ing to the great campaign'against waste.

TODAY men
3 o'clock-George Booth, editor of bered
the Detroit News, will speak in Alum- turer
ni Memorial hall. ofrth
7:30 o'clock-Dean J. R. Effinger dred
speaks to 'the Cosmopolitan club in lectui
Lane hall. day r
7:30 o'clock-Alpha Nu literary so- da,
ciety meets in Alpha Nu rooms, Uni- turne
xersity hall. spend
7:30 Mt. Cemens club meets at 1005 .p,

as the
of the

I' 1

mo'

U

inctively new creation in so:,t
sparlling-snappy--de'icios' I
i i-h th c wholesomnice-ss c f th :
ereals -appetizig wies th th b-
agrceable bittcr t-ng h only
>s Cel im as. It is s 3 to "hit
-sure to encounter no p:judices.
s Ql-yer-'roUnd soft drink

East Washington street.
8 o'clock - Dante club meets in
room 103, University hall.
8 o'clock - Social in Methodist
church parlors for Methodist students
and friends.
8.o'clock-Michigan-M. A. C. basket-
ball game in Waterman gymnasium.
9 o'clock-Engineering society
dance at the Michigan Union.
TOMORROW
7 o'clock-Upper Room Bible class
meets at 444 South State street.
7:30 o'clock-Craftsman club meets
in Masonic Temple.
8 o'clock - Michigan-Ohio State
basketball game in Waterman gym-
nasium.
8 o'clock-Calendar social in Con-
gregational church.
U.NOTICES
Tryouts for the Comedy club play
will be held at 10 o'clock tomorrow
morning in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Examinations for headquarter's
company will be held at 4 o'clock this
afternoon in the Chemistry building
amphitheater,
A rehearsal of Act 1 of "Tragedy"
at 7 o'clock tonight in University hall
Acts 2 and 3 will be rehearsed Satur-
day at the same time and place.
The Y. 3. C. A, employment office
will be open daily from 8 to 9, 1 to 2,
and 5 to 6 o'clock. Hours on Saturday
will be from 8 to 11.
STUDENTS AND GRADUATES GET
APPOINTMENTS AS TEACHERS
Teaching appointments have already
been secured by two students who will
receive their degrees in February.
George Roop will be mathematics in-
structor at Calument and Lee Thurs-
ton will be science instructor at
Boyne City.
Further recent appointments are as
follows: Lela White, '17, science in-
structor at Noblesville, Ind,; Henrietta
Brown, '14, Latin instructor at Owos-
so; Alice Fisk, '17, mathematics and
natural science instructor at Green-
ville; Norma Wight, '17, chemistry in-
structor at Cheboygan, and Florence
Scott, '14, head of the English depart-
ment at Dowagiac high school.
'Jean Miller, '15, is the new assist-
ant to Superintendent Slauson of the
Ann Arbor schools and Elizabeth Wil-
son has recently accepted a position
in the English department in the State
Normal school at Ypsilanti.
Recreation makes for Effieiency.

619 E. Liberty

p

arrying C
by land a
new lectu

The Ohio State univer
its Union buildings at 9:
of fuel conservation.

as

Ame
Pers

Assistant Prof. C. A. Rucl
the psychology department of I
versity of Illinois recently ad
the Y. W. C. A. on the subject
to keep New Year's resolution
important things he mentions
(1) get a clear idea, (2) make i
olution on New. Year's day, (3
up enthusiasm, and' (4) enfo
resolution on every occasion.

a large, number of, interesting
tures which will be used to illu
his talk apd in this he was aid
the British Foreign office,
whose auspices he is appearing.
Major Beith, whose books hav
a tremendous sale since the pu
tion of the successful "First Hu
Thousand" is about to issue
one, to be called "All In It"-a
countof the activities of the
forces.
The proceeds of the lecture R
used for our boys in France.-E
Choice Wits Fri
College- Exchan

ard Aiairvt Substitute3
t'ie opeda your preae.e, cls seeing that
not been broken, and that tie crown top
xs. Bevo i ;;ol1 in bottle; only -and is
sively by

Due to efforts
ing squad, a ba
formed to repres(
outside matches

ISCH

ST. LOUIS

r .

]5L

The girls in the dory
University of Ohio, wh
of coal ran out., last we
dancing as a means of
until the fuel difficult
allieviated.

Saturday
-I I
'hapman's

Class dancing at the Packard Aca-
demy Monday and Thursday eve-
nings, 7:30 to 9:30. Private lessons
by appointment. Phone 1850-F1.

Student avial
of Ohio have vi
quarters in the
barracks home,

Army Stores Men.
rs and Supplies used in your Course

President
versity of Pi
versity bull
afternoon b
fuel,
Shortage c
versity of I
annual all ci

has

Store

1160-]

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