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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 11, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Ih 1 IVIb N i IN lULL
GOING OVER TKE

"1

.I

KNOWLTON FISK, EX-'19, LOSES
IAFE WHILE IN CANADIAN
SERVICh

HONOLULU," AT THr, WHI'TNEY, SUNDAY, JAN. 13.
Skaters Is Announced others desiring to skate.
Palmer skating rink The affair is not so much in the na-
r this coming Saturday ture of a money maker as it is to stir'
ive committee of the up enthusiasm for this latest venture
ic association. of the W. A. A.
d women are welcome
tudents may gain ad- Rugs cleaned and washed. Satisfac-
senting their athletic tion guaranteed. Koch and Henne.-
cents will be charged Adv.

Knowlton Fisk, ex-'19, of Chicago, I
private in the Princess Pat Canadian
light infantry, was killed while he was
going over the top at Passchendaele.
Fisk had been reported missing since
Oct. 30, and it had been thought that
he had been taken prisoner by the
Germans. News of his death reached
his parents in Chicago a few days ago
in the form of a.letter from Lieut. Or-
rin B. Rexford of the Princess Pat
regiment.
Fiskentered the University in the
fall of 1915 enrolling in the literary
college. He elected his courses to pre-
pare himself for work in the forestry
department, and a number of times ac-
companied the forestry students on
their hikes. While training in Francej
he had written friends at the Unive;-
sity for periodicals devoted to forestry
and also for information concerning
that department here.
Leaves University
Fisk left the- University at the close
of his freshman year. He had been
training with the national guard and
when war was declared by the United
States he made several applications to:
join the -aviation service, but, unable1
to stand delay, finally enlisted in Can-
ada.
The letter of Lieutenant Rexford to
Fisk's parents follows, in part:,
"Somewhere in Franca, Dec. 15.--Dear
Mr. Fisk: Knowlton was with his
battalion on the morning of Oct. 30,
when they went over the top. He
started off with his two chums, Ald-
winckle and Hoile. I don't know just
how far they got in the attack, as the
man who found them is in the hospit-
al. A shell landed close to them in
the assault and the three were instant-
ly killed. The night after the attack
they were buried on the field behind
our line.

13FIERENT DEPARTMENTS EX-
PAND IN ORDER TO INCREASE
INTEREST IN WAR
To stimulate an intelligent interest
in the war, heads of the various de-
partments of the literary college have
changed their courses. There is an in-
terest in the war shown by the stu-
dents but few of them seem to grasp
the significance of the various move-
ients and factors which go to make
ug the great movement.
Alter Business Courses
Courses in the business administra-
tion department have been consider-
ably altered to comply with the new
needs.tThe course in public finance
is now dealing primarily with methods
employed by the government to raise
funds for war uses. Liberty bonds,
their manipulation and issuance is one
of the chief topics of discussion iii the
banking course. In the corporation
course, particular attention is paid to
the, attitude of the government toward
corporations in the present war.
Dismiss Classes Early
Little change has been made in the
courses or methods of instruction in
the chemistry department. The depart-
has always been paying particular at-
te:tion to the turning out of profess-
ional chemists for government work.
Laboratory classes which formerly
were held from 1 to 5 o'clock in the
aftertioon are now dismissed at 3: O
o'clock.
In the department of municipal ad-
ministration which was first designed
to create efficiency in city government
nore attention is being directed toward
the field of international law and the
questions of the war. An effort is
being made to organize the various
agencies of city, county, state and na-
tion into one big organization.
Journalists Study Reviews
Among the several things which are
being emphasized in the journalistic
department is a course in reviews.
Publicity material from the committee
of public information at Washington,
D. C., are read and discussed. An
explanation of the work of the Ger-
mans in this country is one of the main
endeavours. The students are advis-
ed to keep posted on war news at all
times. They are then questioned in
this regard. Al, of this work has been
outlined in a desire to create a more
critical interest in the work of the
Allies asnd America in the war.

225

Flowers
Plants
Ferns

mmI

Ger

Y

Big

,JAN
3CESS

13th

IqHONOLUL U
) McKENT BARNES
Interest, Romance and Laughter'
LATEST HAWAIIAN MUSIC
Vative Hawaiian Quartet te

ig the
-The

Volcano in Eruption-The;
Great Fire Scene

--Boxes $Lit~)

1~J

I Floor Coats Regrouped
> Extraordinary Prices

Casualties Niumeroas
"0ur casualties were numerous aft-
er the attack and it was difficult to get
information concerning the men who
had not come out again. This is why
Private Fisk has been reported miss-
ing so long.
"The commanding officer offers you
his sympathy, which he asks me tox
express, and all the officers and men
join with him in this.'
FORMER MICHI4GAN STUDENTS
WORK IN FORESTS OF FRANCE
Several letters have been received
from former students of the forestry
department of the University who are
with the Tenth regiment of engineer
foresters, now in France, by faculty
members of that department.
The regiment is split into several
details. Some are working in logging
camps and others are building lumber
mills, which are run by American
methods. At present they are cutting.
pine in the region around the Bay of
l.iscay. This lumber is used entirely
.for military necessities such as bridg-
es, railroad ties, dugouts, and quar-
ters for soldiers.
Following is a list/ of the Michigan
men, several of whom are officers, of
the regiment: H. T. Gisbourne, '17;
W. F. Ramsdell, '14; 0. F. Schafer, '14;
A. Voigt, '14; H. T. Lewis, '13; H. M.
Beatty, '13; C. J. Kraebel, '12; J. F..
Dubuar, '15; R. W. Hussey, '15; R. F.
Griffy, '15, and F. L. Tobeaux, ex-'18.
Women to be Given Honors for Skiing
Athletic honors will be given for
skiing according to the same system

wl

There is opportunity in Daily want
ads.- Adv.
Rae Theatre -Today

'arnin' I of
y' "het

Sal

"Please Help Emily" with Ann
Murdock, and an All-Star cast
Also Helen Holmes.

I

R '°

salt

.c year tax-
cause of a
Comedy,
ing 18c, 2c

broadcloths, porn poms and plushes.

awl type collars of fur, plush or self material.
deep yokes with sashes in front, and they are all full
, Burgundy, navy, rose, Jap blue aand black.
Al groups.

i
{
II
I

JESTIC
QU'ALITY PHOTO FLAYS
F 111Ay, JA N. 11
CARMEL MYERS In
"MY UNMARRIED WIFE"
Screen lagazine
Sliows 3-7:30.9-Frices 10c-15
SATURDAY, JAN. 12
Big Double Triangle Program
"TILE MEDICINE MAN"

i

pricr
MJatini

ioc nle

AI
12.3

,00 to $35.00 -$12o75
at . ., i 7L I..

L'.J

ThUr-.Fri- 17-i8-Irene
Maternal Spark."
Weekly.
Sat-ig Open.
Sun-2o-Wm. Russell
Man." Also Con
'.1on-'Iues-tWed-z t-z2

The $35.00 to $45.00
Values at

$19.7 5

Comedy, "Boomerang Frame Up"
Patle News
Showvs 3-7:30-9-Prices lc I

ALL FURS HALF PRICE.
eces of opossum, wolf. fox, racoon. muskrat. coney, lynx and

values at $5.00 to $97.50.

EN'S COATS ABOUT HALF
Aths and wool velours with large convertible collars trim-

at $5.75.
at $6.75.

ITTED PETTICOATS, HALF
ray with colored borders.
. 59c to $1.98, at 30c to 99.

WOOL SKIRTS, HALF
in plain colors, plaids and stripes, marked $5.00 to
and poplins in plain colors, at $2.50 to $10.00.

V U
Fil
LYJ
0

which now regulates 'skating. This
was. decided by the Women's Athletic
association at their monthly meet-
ing Wednesday night.
One honor will be given for four
periods of skiing within a two weeks
time limit if reported promptly at the
office of Miss Alice Evans in Barbour
gyninasium.
THE VEGETABLE MARKET, with
the support and patronage it has re-
ceived, is enlarging its supplies so as
to cater to the public needs.
We have added a large line of the
finest variety of apples ever brought
to the city, also oranges, grapes, ban-
anas, grape fruit, English walnuts,
black walnuts, cranberries, rich cream
cheese, absolutely fresh eggs, but-
ter, etc.
Our vegetable line is complete,
comes from our hot house daily and is
sold 30 to 50 per cent below the cur-
rent prices.
We deliver free, and guarantee ev-
erything we sell.
Vegetable Market, 117 West Wash-
ington St. Phone 2190-F3.

fno,

NNELET KIMONAS, HALF
anese and flowered patterns.
d $1.38-Of extra heavy flannelet.

-S

KIMONAS, HALF
bite, black, pink, plum, gray, yellow

Daily~ advertisers cater
reades.-Ad v.

11111

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