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January 11, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-11

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DAYAND)NMGI
SERVIC

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1918.

PRICE'

f -;RIC,

E GRIFFINS TO TAKE
IN 'EN NEOPHYTES

7] STUDENT HOUSES
FACE COAL FAMINE

TALIAN FIGHTING
HALTED BY SNOW

-Class
Hold

Honorary Society
Second Initiation
Tonight

Will

I i'

Just as the sun drops below the wes-
tern horizon today Griffins, all-cam-
pus upper-class honorary society, will
leave the temple to conduct 10 neo-
phytes across the river Styx, through
the flaming cavern of Emydes and over
the preciptious, vaulted reaches of the'
Mortal barrier to the seat of the Gods;
Those who pass successfully the tests
of Griffins will be given the freedom{
of the sacred temple until the small
hours of tomorrow.

Senate

will be a
e recom-
iittee is
mittee on

at

RM N IN UNIERSITY I
ADVISES MAJ. STARRHETTI
EXPLAINS BUILDING OF NATION-
AL CANTONMENTS IN ILLUS-
TRATED LECTURE
Before a large audience in the Na-
tural Science auditorium, Major W. A.
Starrett urged students to remain in
the University to finish their educa-

ormal, al-
measures
down ex-
the pro-
,he Ameri-

elimin- tion, and presented complete details
will be of the construction of the 16 army can-
ompari- tonments in an illustrated lecture last

Other Fraternities and Societies
Still Have Small
Supplies
SOME ORGANIZATIONS SOLVE
PROBLEM BY USE OF WOOD
Cars Expected From Toledo and Port
huron Fail To Arrive
On Time
(By Chas. R. Osius, Jr.)
Five fraternities and two sororities'
have practically exhausted their coal
supply and are unable to secure more,
according to statements made by their
stewards yesterday. Several others
have only enough to last for a week or
10 days and can see no way of getting
more. A comparative few have a sea-
son's supply.
Some Houses Use Wood
A few of the houses have solved
the fuel problem temporarily by using
wood, regardless of the resulting in-
convenience. Most organizations re-
ly upon the dealers to supply them
and- the city's shortage has entirely
cut off their source. Plenty of wood
is available and immediate delivery
can be secured, so the houses struck
by the famine have resored to using'
wood instead of coal. The houses
which lack fuel are: Zeta Psi, Phi
Gamma Delta, Lambda Chi Alpha Epsi-
pha Tau Omega, Sigma Alpha, Epsi-
lon, Chi Omega, and Alpha Epsilon
Iota.
Few Have Seaspn's Supply
A comparative few of the houses
who have a large storage capacity
have the season's supply in their bins
and so are unaffected by the shortage,
but they are in the minority. Those-
whose supply is fair at present will
be unable to replenish their stock
when exhausted unless some large
shipments are received soon. Somel
houses are getting their coal in' half-
ton lots and are running pretty close
to the bottoms of their bins. Two are
being supplied by the police depart-
ment.
Dormitories Unaffected
The two dormitories, Martha Cook'
and Newberry, are unaffected by the
famine because they are heated by!
the University's power and heatingt
plant. They may feel the shortage if
the University is unable to secure ad-
ditioial fuel when its present limited
supply has run out. Conservation is
being enforced in all campus build-1
ings

SPEAK
WAR WORK

College

ror patriotic war ser-
e subject of an address
E. Wells to the senior
o be given at Barbour
s afternoon. Through
n of trained speakers
t is hoped to bring to
in the country an in-
standing of t'he aims
he government in con-
AI campaigns.
sking the assistance of
ates in this educational
ituted by the associa-
te alumnae.
tional prominence are
ae to the work. Fifty-
omen volunteered their
ss meeting held in that
y. College women will
ve their efforts to this
ier than to the Red
work, which can be
th less training.
.DS WAR MOVES
LITARY COMMITTEE
Jan. 10.-Every phase
partment's preparation
t Germany was outlin-
by Secretary Bak3r

Major Starrett described the work-
ings of the different organizations of
the government, and explained the
three immense tasks before the can-
tonment division of the United States
army. A series of illustrated slides
were shown of the building of Camp
Ayer, Mass. Two reels of motion pic-
tures were flashed on the screen after
the slides, which showed in detail pro-
blems met in erecting Camp Ayer,
Mass., and Camp Dix, Wrightstown,
N. J.
Erect Terminals
"The cantonment division is now
considering some of the largest pro-
blems of the government," sta. ,d
Major Starrett last night. "The stor-
age and terminal problem deals with
the erection of six vast terminals cov-
ering 400 acres of land. Three of
these terminals will be accumulation
depots which will be situated through-
out the country. All of the buildings
will be of a permanent nature.
"It is my personal opinion concern-
ing the taking over of the railroads
that the govtrnment will put the term-
inals in shape. The whole trouble lies
at the terminals, and when the new
ones are built they will be an asset to
the government when the war ends.
Build Cities
"Another problem to be considered
by this division is the industrial hous-
ing program. At the present time
there is no place for the men who are
employed at the different ship build-
ing plants to live, and housing will
have to be built for 15,000 people at
Bridgeport. At Hog Island a city of
125,000 will be built out of the
swamps. This will enhance the mar-
itime and economical status of the
government after the war."
"When the cantonment division was
making plans for the different camps,"
Major Starrett explained as the slides

Peace Between Bolslieviki and liuns
Not Being Discussed, is
Report
SWISS DISPATCH SAYS RUSSIA
SIGNS PEACE WITH BULGARIA
Russians Reject Terms Proposed by
Turks; Cossacks Continue to
Fight Radicals
(War Summary as Prepared by The
Associated Press)
Jan. 10.-On the fighting fronts the
infantry is inactive except for small
raiding operations, but the artillery
duels continue Intensely on various
sectors. In northern Italy snow has
fallen to a depth of from three to five
feet bringing the operations to a halt.
The movement of supplies to the en-
emy army in the hills is being greatly
impeded and the indications at pre-
sent are that fighting of great intensi-
ty will be impossible while the snow
lies on the ground.
Bolsheviki Not Talking Peace
Unofficial dispatches dealing with
the deliberations between the Bolshe-
viki and the Teutonic allies indicate
that for the present peace is not being
discussed, but that the proposition of
the Bolsheviki to change the scene
of the negotiations to Stockholm is
the paramount issue.
Bulgaria Signs Peace?
A dispatch eminating from Switzer-
land asserts that Bulgaria and Russia
have signed a separate peace compact,
but that the Russians have rejected
separate peace terms on the proposals
offered by Turkey. Meanwhile fight-
ing continues in. central and south-
western Russia between the Boshe-
viki forces and revolutionary Cos-
sacks.
LOCAL SUFFRAGISTS TO ATTENDl
ANNUAL MEFTING AT DETROIT
Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, National
President of Association to be
Present
Three delegates from the Washten-'
aw county equal suffrage association
will attend the annual convention of
the Michigan association to be held
Jan. 15-17, at the Hotel Statler, De-
troit.
The representatives, all being from
Ann Arbor, are Mrs. John B. Waite,
president of the Washtenaw unit, Mrs.
George W. Patterson, and Mrs. Carrie
S. Burr. Arrangements are being made
to have an entire table reserved for
Ann Arbor women who wish to attendi
the supper to be given at 7 o'clock
Tuesday night.
One object of the convention is to
map out a campaign preparatory to
the introduction of a suffrage bill into
the state legislature. It is expected
that action will be taken on the meas-
ure in about 10 months.
Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, president
of the national association will be
present at the convention.
DR. M. LUCKIESH WILL GIVE
LIGHTING LECTURE TONIGHT

INAUGURATE PLANS FOR
TKRIFT STAMP CAMPAIGN~
FRANCIS BACON HAS CHARGE OF
CAMPUS ORGANIZATION;. WORK
MILL BEGIN AT ONCE
Plans for Washtenaw county's cam-
paign for the sale of was saving cer-
tificates and thrift stamps were form-
erly inaugurated at the first meeting,
of the county committee yesterday
noon at the city Y. M. C. A.
Francis Bacon, chairman for the Un-
iversity, expects to complete the cam-
pus organization within the next few
days. Active work will be begun at
once.
The campaign on the campus and
throughout the county is part of the
nation-wide purpose to raise $2,000,-
000,000 for the prosecution of the war.
County Chairman G. W. Millen was
in charge of the meeting, introducing
as speakers Attorney W. J. Manchest-
er, and J. G. Standard, '96L, both of
Detroit.
MICHIGAN UNION MAY STAGE
COUNTY FAIR IN FEBRUARY
Proceeds Will Be Used To Reimburse
Funds For Amount Sent
To Paris

senate military c
rered those who1
partment with th
army as that u
g ever had been
trained so quickly
.s questioned par
fys in furnishing
rifles. The secre
there' had been s

GARFIELD ORDERS
COAL CURTAILMENT
Paper Factories Must Suspend Coal
Use For Two Days Weekly;
Penalty For Break
Washington, Jan. 10.-Fuel Admin-
istrator Garfield tonight directed all
manufacturers of paper board to sus-
pend absolutely the use of fuel be-,
tween 7 o'clock Saturday morning and
the same hour Monday morning. Com-
pliance with tonight's order is made
obligatory under a penalty. About
15,000 tons weekly or 780,000 tons an-
nually will be saved this way.

have were being flashed on the screen, "the
has- topography of the land was not known'
snder and the plans had to be issued. The
rais- camps are modern in every respect.
r.s possessing streets, a complete water
ticu- system, a fire fighting force, scores of
ma- electric lighted buildings, a cold stor-
tary age plant, sanitary conditions and
ome amusement centers where the men can
that congregate."
ade- Each Caup Houses 42,000 Men
re- During the lecture Major Starrett
ving pointed out that the average outlay
.alue entailed at each camp was the plotting
>ped, of 10,000 acres of land, erecting 1,200
buildings for 42,000 soldiers, and the
laying of hundreds of miles of pipe
ay and wire. A little less than 10 per
from cent of the entire yearly wood supply
Jan. in the United States was employed in
Ike" the erection of the 16 cantonments,
this The lecturer also .claimed that from
rary 200 to 300 alien spys existed in every
lass camp.
pay "Stick to your education first, and
'eas- finish your course in the University,"
o 12 Major Starrett said in ending his lec-
Rfar- +i-% "Vmir- nnnt+- will"nP^ l^" i

WOMAN SUFF
PASSES HOULI
SINGLE VOTE
SPEAKER CLARK OFFE]
BALLOT TO PA
MEASURE
SUFFRAGISTS TO
AGITATION IN
Representative Beakes of
Among Democrats V
For Resolution

City Conditions Unchanged
Conditions in the city remain the
same as they were Wednesday, accord-
ing to Acting Chief of Police Thomas
O'Brien. No more coal has been re-
ceived and the number of daily appli-
cations is about the same. The people
are managing to keep warm, accord-
ing to all indications, and there will
be no suffering unless matters become
much more critical. The poor are be-
ing supplied by the police. The cars,
expected from Toledo and Port Huron
have not arrived to date but it is
hoped they will be delivered before
the end of the week.
Factory Supply Satisfactory
Factories are able to keep running
by almost daily deliveries, although
several of them have secured carload.
lots. The supply of the Parker Manu-
facturing company is still low, but
other plants seem to be in fair condi-
tion. No fear has been expressed that
any of them will close unless condi-
tions grow worse.
People in all parts of the city, re-
gardless of their supply, are urged to
make every effort at conservation. If
the supply grows less, those having
coal will probably be asked to share
it with people having none. It is a
patriotic move to save every lump of
coal. Sifting of ashes will help con-
serve.
Estimate U. S. Gold at $3,041,00,000
Washington, Jan. 10.-:The gold
monetary stock (coin and bullion used
as money) in the United States ' on
Nov. 1, 1917, is estimated in Secretary
McAdoo's annual report at $3,041,500,-
000. The increase in the past 10
months has been $174, 500,000, and in
the past three years $1,236,500,000. In
five years the portion of the world's+

In order to reimburse itself to the
extent of the $1,000 given to the Amer-
ican University Union in Paris, the
Michigan Union has decided to give
same sort of festival in the nature of
a county fair, provided the committee
on student affairs sanctions the plan.
If the affair is held, it will take place
at the end of the first week of the sec-
ond semester.
The decision was reached yesterday
at the meeting of the board of direct-
ors of the Union.
Several Union members who have
permitted non-members to use their
membership cards for the purpose of
procuring dance tickets were given
warning that a repitition of such act-
ion would result in expulsion.
The appointment committee was au-
thorized to choose a committee to
nominate a successor to Waldo Mc-
Kee, ex-'18E, former engineering vice-
president of the Union. McKee is now
in the third officers' training camp at
Camp Custer.
The financial statement of the Un-
ion was read and discussed, and the
president was authorized to appoint
a committee to revise the section of
the house rules concerning guests.
Sleeper Appoints Preparedness Boards
Lansing, Jan. 1Q.-With the appoint-
ment by Governor Sleeper today of
county war preparedness boards for
every county of Michigan the first
steps were taken to co-ordinate and
combine all Michigan's civilian war
activities.
The governor's order will bring un-
der the general direction of the state
every civilian activity now backing the
boys in the camps and trenches. It
makes permanent for the duration of
the war all organized bodies support-
ing the military forces of the United
States.
The governor's appointments for
Washtenaw county are: George W.
Millen and Frederick W. Stevens, of
Ann Arbor, and William B. Hatch, of
Ypsilanti.

(By Associated Pres
Washington, Jan. 10.-W
frage by federal constitutioi
ment won in the house to
exactly the required numb
irmative votes.
While m'embers in their
throngs in the galleries w
eager interest, the house a
a vote of 274 to 136 a resol
'iding, for submission to
of the so-called Susan I
amendment for national, en
ment of women. Repr
Beakes of Ann Arbor was
Democrats voting for the re
Speaker Clark promised i
vote from the chair for the
if it was needed. The ch
single vote to the opposit
have meant defeat.
Start Fight In Sena
The house hardly had adj
fore the suffrage champ
gan their fight for
action on the senate
the capitol. Recent po
had indicated that the
two-thirds vote could not b
ed, but discouraged by thet
tory and counting upon the
of President Wilson, who can
support last night, the suffra
to bring the senate into lin
have the amendment before
legislfttures during the com
They feel sure at least of
vote in the senate before th
session ends.
Proposed amendmen
The proposed - amendmen
constitution reads:
"Sec. 1. The right of citiz
United States to vote shall
nied or abridged by the Unil
or by any state on account
"Sec. 2. Congress shall h
by appropriate legislation
the provisions of this articl
Fail To Amend Lang
Every attempt made to a
language was beaten. R
tive ard of Ohio tried unsi
to 'put on it the same limit
ied by the resolution for
bitlon constitutional amend
it must be ratified by the si
in seven years from the
its submission. Representati
of Indiana sought to have
dum for special conventio:
state required. The Gard a
was rejected 159 to 246,
Moores amendment 131 to 2
Of the total membership
the house there were 410
who voted. They lined up a
For the resolution, Democ
Republicans, 165; Miscella
total, 274.
Against the resolution, I
102; Republicans, 33; Progr
total, 136.

)w de

"The Lighting Art-Its Practice and
Possibilities," is the subject of the il-4
lustrated lecture which Dr. M. Luck-
iesh will deliver at 8 o'clock (eastern
time) tonight in room 348 of the Eng-
ineering building.
Dr. Luckiesh, a physicist with the
Nela research laboratory of the Gen-
eral Electric company at Cleveland,
Ohio, is a most entertaining lecturer.
This lecture should be of great value
to all students of architecture, elec-
trical engineering and physics. The
speaker has distinguished himself na-
tionally as the author of several uni-
que books on shade and shadow, and
color effects in lighting besides num-
erous articles and papers on the sub-
ject of school lighting and allied
topics.
May Reduce Classes in Law School.
Because of the'decrease in attend-
ance, classes in most subjects in the
Law school will probably be cut down
to half their usual number next sem-
ester. A number of students from this
department have answered the call
to the colors since the beginning of

"Social sere
opportunities
woman," said
general secre
aid society of
this subject
Lane hall.
"For the c
sonality and

GEORGE R. BED
TO WOMEN 0

merry f
ternoon.

I inl

Virginia Favors Dry Amendment
Richmond, Va., Jan. 10.- The na
tional prohibition amendment was ra
ified by the Virginia senate today b
a vote of 30 to 8. A resolution to sul
mi +h nan - ntto- af-a+n

,

stock held

the

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