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January 10, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IN

BY USING BOTH
ALDER1[EN FAVOR CENI
WINTER AND EAS'T
FOR SUTIER

WITh
S FOR

IN

INI

Society I
and

SPRING

J

I

Washington, Jan. 9.--While the year
just closing has been one of the most
eventful in the history of our nation,
it has likewise been an unusual one in
the crop history of Michigan, accord-
ing to a report in the annual govern-
ment crop report.
Farmers, stimulated by the extraor-
dinary needs of the country and pros-
pective high prices, exerted themselves
as never before to do their bit in the
common cause.. Tha shortage of lab-
or, which has become more serious
each succeeding year during the last
few years, presents an ever increas-
ingly difficult problem. Farmers in
general worked an unusual number of
hours; wives and children assisted up
to the limit of their ability; and such
help as could be obtained from cities
and towns was utilized as far as pos-
sible to speed up production.
This resulted in an increased acre-
age of all spring-planted crops. The
production of wheat and rye was
slightly in excess of last year. More
oats were produced than in any pre-
vious year except 1915. This holds
true also of barley and potatoes. Some
of the fruits showed light crops, but
pears, cherries, and grapes were gen-
erally satisfactory.

Mr. .1. G Reynolds, city clerk, is of
the opinion that the people of Ann
Arbor will adopt Eastern time for the
summer, but will retain Central stand-
ard for the winter, at the coming
election to be held April 1.
"Most of the aldermen are in favor
of Eastern time during the summer
months, in accordance with the ord-
inance passed last year. But they do
not feel that the people of Ann Arbor
care to have it all of the time. It is
asking too much for a laboring man
t) get up in the morning at five or
six o'clock Eastern time. It is also
too much of a hardship on the women
who have to get breakfasts so early.
"If the measure to be voted on next
April is between Eastern or Central
time for the whole year, I am afraid
Eastern time will be defeated. But
if the people are given a chance to
vote for Eastern or Central time in the
winter, and Eastern in the summer,
as has been the case heretofore, I
feel sure that the ordinance passed
last year will be continued."
* * * .* * * * * *p * * * *

So.

Six"

*
*

AT THE THEATERS

*
*
*

* "A Successful Calamity" at the *
* Garrick *

House

whatever see us

Main St.

ES
MD
sodws

I

G.

tionery

SITR'D BY :M[ANY
DURING PAST YEAR
., Jan. 9.-A total of
1 steamers and 97
an aggregate tonnage
ed the twinports of
enoninee,. Mich., dur-
shown by the annual
Collector of Customs
on.
had a total tonnage
the tonnage of the

Talked About in
College World
The Minnesota student senate has
barred cigarette advertisements from
the university daily, which will mean
a loss of at least $400 a year to the
paper.
The student council of Purdue re-
cently received a bill from the Fort
Wayne and Northern Indiana trac-
tion company for repairs on. street
cars damaged on the night of the pa-
rade following the Y. M. C. A. cam-
paign. The case was later dismissed
because this is the first offense of this
kind and the damage was of minor
importance.
A plan has been submitted to Presi-
dent Bryan of the University of In-
diana to begin classes at 7:30 o'clock
and let them continue until 12:20 at
noon, making five class periods in the
morning. This plan is advised in or-
der that military drill may be held
in toge morning without interfering
with regular classes.
The youngest man ever elected cap-
tain of the Minnesota football eleven
is Norman Kingsley, nineteen years
old. He weighs 200 pounds and is six
feet tall. He is captain-elect for 1918.
Junior men of .Indiana university
have decided to wear buff corduroy
vests for the remainder of the school
year and the girls are considering
buff puttees, as a means of distin-
guishing juniors from other students.
BUILDER OF NATIONAL ARMY
CANTONMENTS WILL LECTURE
"Try as he may, the layman will not
be able to comprehend what has been
done in this building of 16 'cities in
three months," writes the Engineer-
ing News-Record, concerning the work
of Major W. A. Starrett, builder of
16 national army cantonments
throughout the United States, who will
give an illustrated lecture on "Con-
struction of Cantonments". at 7 :30
o'clock this evening in the amphithea
ter of the Natural Science building.
The reports of the war department
give unqualified endorsement to 'the
policy wbich gave unlimited authority
to Major Starrett in this work.
ECONOXY IS WATCUIWORMD
OF DAY, SAYS DEAN WELLS
"Careful figuring of the personal
budget, and econoiny in ever hing,
are essentials in every phase of our
lives, these days," said Miss Agnes
E. Wells, acting Dean of women, yes-
terday at vesper service at Newherry
hall.
Still more important, said Miss
Wells, was' thoughtfulness in the ex-
pense of time and energy. "Most of
us," she declared, "could do more and
better work if we would makea
square estimate of our powers and

* Orpheum-Viola Dana in
* Cossock Whip." Also Come

"
*:
x

Rae-Madame Petrova in "Sil- *
ence Sealers." Also Jerry Comedy. *
Arcade-Rex Beach's "The Auc- *
tion Block." Also Christie come- *
dy. *
*

a
*k
1;
*

Vow

TODAY

* * * * * * * * * * * * * I
AT THE WHITNEY
"Twin Beds." described by the press
agent as "The liveliest comedy of the
stage and three continents," will be
the offering at the Whitney tonight.
The show ran for a year in New York,
two years in London, and six months
in Australia, and it is said to be ex-
ceedingly funny. The cast which will
appear in the Ann Arbor production
is the same one that played the De-
troit Opera house and in other cities,
with Lois Bolton in the leading role.
A
AT THE ARCADE

"Twin Beds" at'the Whitney.
Majestic-"The Grell Mystery."
Also Comedy, "Grit and Grati-
tude."
Wuerth-Roy Stewart in "The
Learnin' of Jim Benton." Also
Comedy, "When War Meant
Peace." Weekly.

*I

*

Cot

Rex Beach's "The Auction Block,"
to be shown at the Arcade today and
tomorrow, is an example of a play
that does not depend upon a star for
its popularity. It is from a finely
conceived character that the action
springs, that of a young girl, Lorelei
Knight, daughter of a small town poll-
titian and an ambitious but nagging
mother. She is beautiful and her par-
ents decide to make capital of the
fact, and bring her up carefully, hop-
ing to reap from their sacrifices in
due time by marrying her off to a man
with money.
Rubye de Remer takes the part of
the heroine, and Rex Beach, the au-
thor, personally supervised the piece.

inn Art
nts of

"A NIGHT IN
WHITNEY S
QUESTIONNAIT
FROM WASHT:

DUE TODA

On British Des
8.-A British to
has been torp

The last of'*the questionn
Washtenaw county were ma
terday from the office of t
board. All those who fail ti

e saved, but
vere lost.

W HIT NEY
M. R. WILLIAMS
SUNDAY EVENIl

JLsavs Copy
at
Stdents'
Supply Store

THE

OST-Note book with name outside,
with fountain pen attached. Phone
740-M.
WANTED
rANTED- Employment as a porter
in fraternity house or other work
of a similar .nature. Call J. Kaki, at

A NIGHT I!
By HOWARD
A Feast of Joy-Full -of
COME AND HEAR THE
By The Imperial A

use them efficiently."
H. J. Hyde, ex-'20H, Visits Ann Art
Petty Officer Harold J. Hyde,
"20H, visited friends in Ann Arbor y
terday. Hyde is now on furlough a

.1

A Gorg(

)pportunity to #s:

9

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