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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 09, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-09

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I!

H 1 UBMtAL RHBIIL
FOR CAMP CUSTER ME

WHAT'S GOING ON

It. isn't original cost-

,NI

.z NEWS

Fabrics

>lens are hard to get. But despite
rtment of all-wool fabrics in the
!rns for men's stylish clothes are on
s an event you can't afford to over-
$30.00 buys a good suit that is truly
HING EXTRA

I MALCOLM
I EAST LIBERTY STREET
ilem In Economy
Our Difference
Price Others on 5 Rolls
..............10c 15c 25C
90...........04c ea. 05eea. 90C
'ence in price................... ......$1.15
FILMS WITH US AND SAVE MONEY
I printed half day to day sooner than others.

Call us for Party and Group Pictures
TO CONVINCE YOU
leal only in COMPETENT repair work. .
:u KNOW that when you decide to leave us a
mple or complex-you can be sure of beingm

hand..

DE JEWELER
NICKELS ARCADE

In

'NTION

Taking Military Drill
F, S. Regulation

OFFICERS NEED LENSES FOR AIR.
PLANES ON FRENCH
FRONT
Camp Custer, Jan. 8. . - The first
consignment of 1,082 pairs of rubbers
from Chicago are due to arrive in
camp today, according to Major M. M.
Garrett, camp quartermaster.
Information has been received from
Lansing that 15,000 pairs have been
purchased and the reason given for the
fact that a receipt has been received
for but 1,082 pairs is that the footwear
was purchased in varying sized lots
in the Chicago market and will be
shipped accordingly.
Coal Waste Considered
The camp is in receipt of unofficial
information that Mr. John McCabe,
city safety engineer of Detroit, has
complained to Washington that from
15 to 20 per cent of the fuel used in the
camp is wasted because of the manner
of heating system now in use. The
report of camp authorities showed that
the installation of a return system
would cost $200,000, which with the
cost of operating the pumping ma-
chinery, would exceed present costs of
additional fuel used.
Play to be Given
Capt. Frank Picard has been named
producing officer for the first play to
be presented by the soldiers in camp.
The first production will be an opera,
the lyrics for which have been written
by Captain Picard. The lyrics are
now being set to music by Mr. Archer,
the Fosdyck commission musical di-
rector.
Beginning yesterday every officer of
the division below the rank of major
must take one-half hour of vigorous
military training daily. This applies
to office men as well as line officers
and General Parker is setting the
pace.
Airplanes Need Lenses
Officers of the signal corps at Camp
Custer are appealing to the' people of
Michigan for camera lenses with which
to equip the airplanes that are soon
to be flying over the west front.
"All makes of foreign lenses are
needed," states the official appeal.
"That is, of a working aperture of F.
3.5 and F. 4.5, with focal lengths of
from 8s to 24 inches."
LASTING PEACE MUST HAVE
DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES
Amsterdam, Jan. 8.-The Social
Democratic party, says a Berlin dis-
patch, has adopted a resolution that
in view of the occurrences at Brest-
Litovsk and the annexationists, attack
on the people's rights of self determina-
tion, it again declares that a lasting
peace is only possible if the democrat-
ic principle of self-determination is
honestly carried out.
The party demands that free and
absolutely independent expression of
will shall be guaranteed to the peo-
pies concerned.
The Social Democratic party also
unanimously has resolved to , combat
the misuse of the right of self deter-
mination for the purpose of disguis-
ing annexationists.
British capture 114,5544 In Year
London, Jan. 8.-The war office has
issued a summary of the British cap-
tures and losses in the war during
1917. The total captures on all fronts
numbered 114,544 prisoners and 781
guns. The losses numbered 28,379
prisoners and 166 guns. The items in-
clude:
Western theater, 73,131 prisoners,
431 guns captured, and 27,200 prison-
ers and 166 guns lost.
Palestine, 17,646 prisoners and 108
guns captured.

Mesopotamia, 15,944 prisoners and
124 guns captured.
No guns were lost except in the
western theater.
Takes Census of Alien Dependents
Lansing, Jan. 8.-Mr. A. Mitchell
Palmer, federal custodian of alien pro-
perty, is now taking a complete cen-
sus of enemy dependents of workmen
in state industrial plants, according
to word received by the state indus-
trial accident board. All compensa-
tion due dependents in enemy coun-
tries must be held in this country un-
til after the war. Money due aliens
in this country may be paid now.

TODA
9 o'clock- Special junior engineer
assembly in room 348, Engineering
building.
3 o'clock - M. Eugene Rovillain
speaks to Cercle Francais in Tappan
hall on "The Trials of a Frenchman
in Germany."
8 o'clock- Intercollegiate Socialist
society meets at 1340 Milmot street,
corner of Mack road.
TOMORROW
12:15 o'clock-Dental faculty lunch-
eon at Michigan Union. -
7:30 o'clock-Major W. A. Starrett,
'97E, spaks on "The Construction of
National Cantonments," in auditorium
of Natural Science building.
U-NOTICES
The Varsity band will rehearse at
7 o'clock tonight in University hall.
There will be a discussion regarding
joining the headquarters bridage.
Meeting of Comedy club at 7 o'clock
tonight in the Cercle Francais room.
The All-Fresh Glee club will meet
at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the School of
Music. All members are requested to
bring dues.
WOMEN PROVIDED
FOR IN NEW UNION
Accommodations For Entertainment
and Housing of Fair Guests
Part of Plan
Time and expense have not been
spared to provide ample accomoda-
tions for women in the new Michi-
gan Union building. On the north
side of the building is the ladies' en-
trance. Just to the right is the parlor
where women may rest or meet friends
by appointment. A bit further down
the hall on the same side is the din-
ing room, the only one in the build-
ing to which women may go when es-
corted by a member of the Union. It
will be open from 7 in the morning un-
til 12 at night.
. The spacious banquet hall on the
second floor will be the scene of le-
tures, parties, and movies, to which
It is said the fair sex will sometimes
be invited, and they may also occas-
inally have it to themselves. Along
the north side of the third floor is a
large assembly room that University
girls may have for the asking for class
parties and other college functions.
On the fourth floor are the boudoir
suites which are available to out of
town members accompanied by wives
or families. Women attending Union
dances on Saturday night will get a
peep into the magnificient basement
serveself or rathskeller, where the
dancers will have an opportunity to
secure refreshments.
"Undoubtedly," said Mr. Homer L.
Heath, general becretary, "the direc-
tors will grant a limited number of
privileges to women students, alum-
nae, and adult women members of
the immediate family of Union mem-
bers, in which case they may enjoy
all the privileges mentioned unaccom-
panied by male escorts. They would
be at liberty to hold their afternoon
teas in the first floor dining room or
drop in for refreshments whenever
they chose. It is also quite probable
that the directors will open the swim-
ming tank two or three mornings a
week to women holding such privil-
eges."
Baths Lhidted to One Each Wedk
Lynn, Mass., Jan. 8.- Bath fiends,
take notice.-
The Saturday night hot bath-the
kind in which you sit and read by the
hour-came into its own again here

today.
The landlord of a fashionable apart--
ment house sent tenants a neatly
printed notice, reque'sting in delicate
terms that they limit their baths to
one a week.
The request was made in the inter-
est of coal conservation. Cold bath
devotees are exempt.
Soldiers Transferred To Battle Creek
Battle Creek, Jan. 8.-Camp Custer,
which has been sending men to other
camps since it opened, received a
thousand men from Jefferson bar-
races, St. Louis, Mo., today, and it is
intimated several thousand more are
to follow. These men enlisted in the
regular army, but conditions are said
to be such at Jefferson barracks, that
the transfer of the men to Camp Cus-
ter was decided upon.
Auto Thief Captured in Port Huron
Port Huron, Jan. 8.-David Hoover
is said to have confessed to the theft
of eight automobiles in Detroit and
Toledo recently. His band rented a
barn here in which stolen cars were
stored.

SENIORS
Arrange Your Sitting for the

Michiganensian
Photos NOW

Take a shirt, for instance. The price you pay the retailer f
usually less than the subsequent amount you pay for launder
But, the more you pay for upkeep of the article, the grea
value of that article to you. In other words, the more you pay t
it costs you.
The Home Laundry has by institution of common-sense in
lowered wear and tear on your laundry to an irreducibly min
That's your gain, and ours.
Your account payable monthly, if you desire.
OUR CASH CARD SAVES YOU 10%.

619 E. Liberty

Phone

. 0. T. C. MEN ASKED TO
SIGN FOR DRILL CLASSES

Men

Home Laundry

Desiring Permanent Appoint-
ments Advised To Attend
Classes

)L SPIRAL PUTTEES

Upkeep

-fray edges, $3.00 the pair to all students
Why Pay $5.00?
you a price on Military Mackinaws

218 E. HURON STREET

PHONE No.

i

r & Company
State and William Streets
FURNISHINGS AND HATS

Page One)
o conserve

the

domestice consumers will be the only
classes of consumers to recoive 100
per cent of their needs while the war
continues.
Curtailment of fuel consumption
necessarily implies reduction of output
by the factories, so the fuel adminis-
tration sees in its program aid in the
diversion of labor and materials to
war work. The budget by agreement
is adopted in lieu of the often propos-
ed arbitary classification of industries
into essential and non-essential div-
isions.

Members of the R. 0. T. C.'are re-'
quested to sign up for the advance
drill classes, which are held at 2 o'-
clock every afternoon and 7 o'clock
everyevening, with the exception of
Saturdays and Sundays.
Advancement will be based, to a
large extent upon the work of the men
attending these classes. Each cadet
will be given san opportunity to com-
mand the class. Excellent opportuni-
ties for rapid advancement are open
to the members of the R. 0. T. C., es-
pecially those who are proficient on
the typewriter.
At the present time all the appoint-
ments are temporary. Men desiring
advancement and permanent appoint-
ments are advised to attend all the
drill classes.
Students desiring further informa-
tion should see Lambert at Lieut.
George C. Mullen's office.
New York Plants May Close Soon
New York, Jan. 8.-Fuel administra-
tors -here today gave their serious con-
sideration to the possibility of shutting
down all non-essential industries in
New York, unless there is a rapid and
steady increase in the city's coal
supply.
While there has been some improve-
ment in' the last few days, Harry T.
Peters, chairman of the fuel conserva-
tion committee, declared: "We are
not getting enough coal to take care
of our needs on the present basis."
Many manufacturing concerns lack
coal, he said, and some have had to
close, even a few that are working on
government contracts. Since July 1,
Mr. Peters said, the city has received
1,000,000 fewer tons of bituminous coal
than in the same period last year.
Prominent Citizens Shine Shoes
Plainwell, Jan. 8.-As a part of the
local Y. M. C. A. war fund campaign
recently conducted, Deye Vaughan and
Colonel Leech, prominent citizens,
shined shoes in a barber shop. A con-
siderable sum was received. William
Thomas agreed to donate two dollars
for every one earned by the dignified
"shines."
England May Requisition Livestock
London, Jan. 8.-Livestock is to be
requisitioned when necessary for army
and.civilian requirements and 13 live-
stock commissioners have been ap-
pointed by the food controller to con-
trol its supply and distribution
throughout England, Scotland and
Wales.
American Ship Wrecked on Rocks
A Canadian Port, Jan. 8.-The Amer-
ican steamer Anglouene is reported by.
wireless to be ashore off Scatary is-
land on the Nova Scotia coast and
pounding to pieces on the rocks. The
message stated that the crew had been

ADITIONAL SPORTS
MINNESOTA STUDENTS ASKE]
TO ENTER SOME ATTILET
Twenty-three Fraternities Plan Mi
In Swimming, Basketball
and Track
Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 8.--N
every student of the University of
nesota is expected to participat
some form of athletics through
extensive program of - intran
games. The program hasbeen de
ed upon in line with the conten
of President Marion L. Burton
athletics will prove a real aid in
moting physical efficiency in tim
war.
A big freshman-sophomore me
planned for February. In the sp
an outdoor meet between the
classes will be held and toward
close of the year an All-Unive
met. Varsity track work is to
up much of the practice period.
extensive schedule of basketball, i
and swimming meets has been pla
by representatives of 23 frat
ties at the university who meat
W. K. Foster and revived the I
Fraternity league.
The separate units of the mil
department will organize baske
teams for competition in a tot
ment, Capt. S. C. Britt, comman
has decided.
TENER BELIEVES BASEBALL
WILL PROVE POPULAR IN
John K. Tener, president of the
tional league, believes that bas
will prove as popular as ever
ing the season of 1918, notwithst
ing the anxiety caused by the
He thinks that Americans will 1
ly support their national pastim
they have always done in the pa
The American game of bas
has never had an equal as an
door sport and it is hardly cony
able that it ever will. It seems
this game of our own inventioi
cludes and embraces every els
that stimulates the mind, recreate
exhausted facutly, amuses the ;
sense, revives the sluggish I
makes strong the weak muscle,
impels a vigor and health to the
that no other form of exercise
bining the element of sport can
,complish. Thousands of young A
icans engage in the game of bas
either as a means of pleasureabl
ercise and recreation or as a n
of honorable livelihood while
lions witness the playing of ga
both professional and amateur. P
these benefits are considered the
added incentive for the contint
of professional baseball.

etting Wood
-aternities which
ly of coal an hand
view of the prob-
coal of any kind
are doing all in
e the situation but

ntary agree
At engaged i
ir fuel con
orders of th
ig the agree
factories o
nced tonigh
as its meth
to supply i

_. JUNIOR GIRLS' 1918 PLAY
COMMENDED BY PROF. BRUMM
y The Junior girls' play this year
-_ furnishes more along the line of en-,
n tertaining and imaginative material,
- than offered in any production of.
.e former years, according to Prof. John'
- R. Brumm, director. Dramatic ma-1
f terial in the matter of try-outs, also
It appears particularly favorable, he af-
- firms, both as regards ability and the
n number of girls entering.
All junior girls are urged to at-
i- tend the try-outs from 3 to 5:30 o'-
r clock this afternoon.

possl
.e yea

nd navy,
ties, and

Always-Daily Service-Always.

C! New Army Stores Men.
11 Note Books and Supplies used in your Course

' Su,

ry

Store

Jackso:
of the 1

rescued.

Phone 1160-R

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