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January 09, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1918. PRICE

I

o MORE MEN GO TO
WAR FOM LIT COLLEGE
rUDENTS WITHDRAWN TOTAL
SO; MAJORITY ENTER AVIATION
AN1D NAVAL AUXILIARY

President

Issues

Peace Terms

WILSON OUTLINES TERMS UN
UNITED STATES WIL AC[
15 ANSWER TO GERMAN

e students of the literary
left the University to en-
vice of the government.

'

About 30 men had withdrawn from
r this college up to Dec. 9.
The majority of the men left to en-
ter the aviation service, while a good
r many enrolled in the naval auxiliary
reserve. Most of the withdrawals
were made before Dec. 15, the last
day registered men could enlist.
s Of the 50 men leaving, 19 were son-
iors, 7 juniors, 15 sophomores, and 6
e freshmen. The classes of three of the
men could not be ascertained.
r .Following is the list of students
'who left the literary college:
H. R. Adnanse, '18, of Grand Rapids,
naval auxiliary; Stewart R. Boyer, '21,
' of Monongahela, Pa., navy; Norris
_ Bryant, '20, of Detroit, medical corps
of the ambulance service; G. H. Buck-
ner, '21, of Port Huron, army stores
course; J. Albert Cagney, '20, of Chi-
cago, signal corps of the aviation;
Eraelio Coletti, of Detroit, Camp Cus-
i ter; Harold Coulter, '18, of Chittenan-
t go, N. Y., naval reserves; C. R. Cum-
mings, '18, of Carson City, naval re-
- erves; W. T. Dawson, '20, Toledo, na-
yal reserves; T. 0. Davis, '21, of Hunt-
inigton, W. Va., aviation; C. R. Deven-
dorf, '21, of DesMoines, Ia., navy; J.
Driscoll, '18, of Lead, S. D., naval avia-
tion; C. R. Gordon, '19, of Robinson,
Ill., marines; Earl F. Gasar, '18, of
Grand. Rapids, Camp Custer; Edward
Hoan, '18, of Holland, Mich., Grand
Rapids hospital init; J. B. Hackett,
of Detroit, naval reserves; Arthur
Heuer, '18, of Holland, Mich, Grand
,Rapids hospital unit; R. V. Lamkin,
'19, of Good Hart, naval auxiliary; L.
M. Lambert, '18, of Greenville, O., av-
$ ation; David LLonie, '20, of Bay City,
naval reserves; W. G. McLaughry, '20,
L pf Mercer, Pa., Hospital unit of Pitts-
burg; Frank Martin, '18, of Boise, Ida-
ho, ordnance department; BruceMi-
;ar, '19, of 'Manstique, aviation ser-
vice, stationed at Columbus, O.; E. L.
Maloney, '20, of Cheboygan, naval aux-
iliary; R. E. Newton, '20, of Jacksn,
naval reserve; Roy Nickol.on, of Mt.
Clemens, naval auxiliary; Edgar R.
aige, '18, of Deckerville, United
States army; V. H. Parks, '20, of Ann
Arbor, naval militia; W. A. Patterson,
'21, of Pontiac, Camp Custer; Clarence
Pennoyer, '20, of Ann Arbor, signal
corps; F. T. Phillips, of Green Bay,
Wis., aviation; R. B. Reavill, '19, of
Douglas, Wyo., aviation; E. G. Rein-
,el, '18, of Detroit, aviation; B. J.
cheinma, '18, of Detroit, naval aux-
iliary; J. R. St. Clair, of Duluth, Minn.,
aviation; C. J. Seeley, '18, of Ann Ar-
,bor, quartermasters' school, Jackson-
Ville, Fla.;L. T. Shapten, '20, of Charle-
yoix, marines; E. F. Steketee, '19, of
Grand Rapids, Grand Rapids hospital
unit; L. B. Stevens, '20, of Detroit;
C. W. Stoll,'20, of Escanaba, aviation;
F. J. Tebbe, '21, of Benton Harbor, to
enter West Point; Matthews S. Towar,
'19, of Detroit, naval militia; D.. H.
Yan Horn, '20, of Elmira, N. Y., avia-
tion; C. J. Warren, '18, of Rapid City,
S. D.; V. L. Watts, '19, of Alto, naval
reserves; G. P. Weadock, '18 of De-
troit; Arthur Weadock, '20, of Sagi-
paw, aviation; Elton Wieman, '19, of
Tryimga, Cal., aviation; C. D. Wilson,
18, of Jackson, naval reserves; C. W.
Wood, '18, of Grand Rapids, officers'
training camp, Camp Custer; Harry
Wodford, '20, of Goshen, Ind., navy.

1. Open covenants of peace without private international Un-
derstandings.
2. Absolute freedom of the seas in oeace or war except as they
may be closed by international action.
3. Removal of all economic barriers and establishment of equal-
ity of trade conditions among nations consenting to peace and asso-
elating themselves for its maintenance.
4. Guarantee for the reduction of national armaments to the low-
est point, consistent with domestic safelty.
5. Impartial adjustments of all colonial claims based upon the
principle that the peoples concerned have equal weight with the in-
terests of the government.
6. Evacuation of all Russian territory and opportunity for Russia's
political development.'
7. Evacuation of Belgium without any attempt to limit her sover-
eignty.
8. All French territory to be freed and restored, and reparation.
for the taking of Alsrye-Lorraine.
9. Readjustment of ltaly's frontidrs along clearly recognizable
lines of nationality.
10. Freest opportunity for autonomous development of the peo-
ples of Austro-Hungary.
11. Evacuation of Rumania, Serbia and )Lontenegro, with access
to the sea for Serbia and international guarantees of economic and
political independence and territory integrity of the Balkan states.
12. Secure sovereignty for Turkey's portion of the Ottoman em-
pire, but with other nationalities under Turkish rule assured secur-
ity of life and opportunity for autonojous development, with the
Dardanelles permanently opened to all nations.
13. Establishment of an indepcndent Polish state, including ter-
ritories inhabited by indisputably Polish populations, with free ac-
cess to the sea and political and economic independence and terri-
torial integrity guaranteed by international covenant.
14. General association of nations under specific covenants for
mutual guarantee of political Independence and territorial integrity
to large and small states alike..

U'

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Junior Engineers Will Assemble
A special assembly of the junior
engineers will be held at 9 o'clock
this morning in room 348, Engin-
eering building, for the purpose
of discussing and taking definite
action on a 1918 J-Hop. All jun-
ior engineers are excused from
classes which conflict with this
meeting.

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HAS
RUSS

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SYMPAT
REPRESI

Document Clears
Genuine Neg
Cdntral

EXECUTIVE
TO ALL]

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Custer IBoys Take
Up NewSong Hit
A new marching song, which had
its origin in the officers' training com-
pany at Fort Meyer, has made its
appearance at Camp Custer. It prom-
ises to become the hit of the division,
combining a swinging, catchy air,
written in excellent marching time,
with the fact that it gains, rather than
loses, effect, from repetition. The
words:
When Uncle Sammy, he gets the in-
fantry;
He gets the cavalry,.he gets artillery;
Then we'll all go over to Germany,
And God heilp Kaiser Bill!
God help Kaiser Bill!
God help Kaiser Bill!
When Uncle Sammy, he gets the in-
fantry,
He gets the cavalry, he gets artillery;
Then we'll all go over to Germany,
And God help Kaiser Bill!
Local Board Sends 8 Men To Arsenal
The local selective service board
sent eight men from the Washtenaw
county list of registered men, who
have volunteered for immediate ser-
vice, towthe arsenal at Augusta, Ga.
They were John R. Parsley, Carl L.
Walter, William E. Ghent, Louis S.
Ramsdell, Donal Balyeat, Clarence 0.
Bahnmiller, Newton S. Bement, and
Louis R. Bebout.
Arthur Parrish; a bricklayer, who
volunteered for service in that capac-
ity, was sent to San Antonio, Tex., by
the local board this morning.
Elton A. Fahrner was sent to Camp
Custer this morning by the local
board.
WILL HOLD OPERA
TRY-OUTS TONIGHT
Chorus Candidates Will Be Judged
On Dancing Ability; Cast Gath-
ers Wednesday

Washington, Jan. 8.-An
gram of war and peace w
terms upon which the na
and small, fighting toget
the German world dom
ready to lay down their am
en to the world by Presid
today through an address
in joint session.
This program, based.upc
ing of wrongs and the safe
loving peoples, desiring t
own lives, the President
the Untgd States to figh
tinue fighting until it is
Thus, he pledged the cou
Allied 'policy of no sepa
"We cannot be separated
or divided in purpose," he
stand together to the end.
Speech Aproved
The speech heard by con
hour's notice,, and accep
wave of approval that brou
er virtually every eleme
houses, was delivered as a
sponse to the German chal:
negotiations with the Ruw
robbed of force in advanc
man peace drive designed
the entente and American g
and their people, while a
time presenting the foun(
genuine negotiations wh
Central powers are ready
just peace.
Fourteen concrete pro:
down by the Presidentbega
declaration that the days
international understanding
and that covenants of pea
reached in the open.
Sympathizes with Ruf
A notable feature of the a
the sympathetic attitude o:
dent toward the Russian
tives who dealt with the
the peace conference. Th
he said, presenting a perf
statemant of the princi
which they would be will
elude peace, were sincere a
est, and when they found t
ual German terms of settle
from the military leaders.

>ing tc
y ever:
Mr. H

POOR HOUSING CURTAILS
U.S, OUTPUT OFSHIPS
SHIPBUILDER STATES PROBABLE
OUTPUT FOR YEAR WILL BE
3,000,000 TONS
Washington, Jan. .8.-America's prob-
able output of merchant ships In 1918
was put as 3,000,000 tons today by
Homer L. Fergason, president of the
Newport News Shipbuilding Co. testi-
fying at the Senate shipbuilding in-
quiry. Estimates frequently made of
from 5 to 8,000,000 tons, he declared,
were misleading to the public and
should not be permitted to go unchal-
lenged.
The greatest obstacle now in the
way of rapid construction: he said, is
poor housing facilities for shipyard
workers. His story of housing condi-
tions at Newport News so stirred the
committee that a sub-committee com-
prising Chairman Fletcher and Sena-
tor Harding was appointed to confer
tomorrow with the proper government
officials with a view to obtaining -im-
mediate relief there and elsewhere.
He said there was no limit to the
amount of ships this country can
build if it really sets Itself to the
task.
He added, however, that proper
housing must be provided 'for the

WILL

ACCEPT APPLICATIONS
THIS WEEK AT
UNION

Lieut. J. H. Clark and an assistant.
surgeon, of the-naval auxiliary branch
at Cleveland, will arrive here Monday
or Tuesday to conduct physical exam-
inations and to swear in all students
who have filed applications before that
date.
Owing to the limited facilities for
training in seamanship now available
on the Atlantic coast, it will be im-
possible to send more than 15 quar-
termasters per month for training
during February, March, and. April.
It is probable that students enrolling
now will not be called until some time
in April or May, and there is a possi-
bility that such students may receive
credit for the second semester's work
before leaving.
All students subject to draft must
have a special permit before enroll-
Ing in this branch of the service, but
those holding draft numbers of 5,000
or 6,000, or over, can easily secure
such permits. Applications will be
received at the Union betwen 7 and 8
o'ciock, eastern time, every evening
until Lieutenant Clark's arrival.
Will Hold All-Engineering Dance

EXAMINATIONS TO BE
HELD FOR AUXILIARY'

3 aid can be given to bus-
while there is such need
citizens generally.
than 12 hours," said Mr.
e supplied 96 families yes-
i half-ton lots of coal giv-
lie fuel administration and
ve no more, nor is there
ct of getting more." The
to the city yesterday was
by the fuel administration
d Ann Arbor.
rsity rossiole Source
versity will see no one act-
r," said Regent Junius E.
fuel administrator, when
regarding the action of the
egents in sharing the coal
ersity with the city. "While
reserve will last the cam-
ntil March, allotments to
1 be made in case of actual
." Mr. Beal added that he
stic in regard to the situa-
he feels will be cleared up
r future. The University's
expected to. last for three

Chorus try-outs for "Let's Go," the
coming Union opera, will be held at
7:30 o'clock this evening at the Un-
ion. At this time, those competing
for a place in the chorus will be judg-
ed solely on their dancing ability.
Voice tests will be held later.
The chorus for this year's opera
,is smaller than usual, and it is thought
that the competition will be stronger.
All intending to try out are therefore
urged to be present this evening, as
an early start will be of material ad-
vantage.
Cast try-outs will be held next Wed-
nesday.' Definite announcement as to
the exact time will be made later.
BANKERS TO GIVE REPORTS
ON DEPOSITS OF RAIL LINES

off.
Upon the questic
Russians and the v
to the military and
ority which so far
Tdutonic policy, or
ers and parties vv
and intention of the

i

, according to the
r, received a small
esterday, which they
cordance with the
ders nlaced and the

Majestie Theater Gets New Manager
Mr. Gus S. Greening, who has been
manager of the Majestic theater of
Ann Arbor for the past season, ex-
pects to leave for Detroit to take up
his ndw duties Saturday as manager
of the Miles theater.
Mr. Greening has made many friends
among people in Ann Arbor during his
stay in the city, especially among the
students. Mr. J. I.;Wanzeck, formerly
connected with the Majestic and Whit-
ney theaters of Ann Arbor will suc-
ceed Mr. Greening as manager of the
Majestic.
Fish Eating Will Be Encouraged
Washington, Jan. 8.-An appropria-
tion of $30.000 has been turned over
to the bureau of fisheries by President

workers. An All-engineer dance will be given
by the Engineering society Friday ev-
ening at the Union. A number of spe-
Michigan Gives 471 Nurses to U. S. cial stunts have been prepared by the
Michigan has 2,762 registered nurs- officers in charge. Ike Fischer's or-
es, according to the report of the chestra will furnish the music.
Michigan State Nurses' association.
Of this number 471 are enrolled as Ward, '18, Marries Grace Telley
Red Cross nurses. At- present the hos- Robert Ward, '18, of Ypsilanti, and
pital training schools of the state Miss Grace Telley of Harbor. Springs,
hnve an enrollment of 1,672 pupils.' were married during the Christmas
Of these 480 are new students, and holidays. Ward will leave immediate-
there is room for 665 students to be ly after the Varsity debate to join the
enrolled during 1918. naval auxiliary.
Fifth Program on Normal Concert Course
TONIGHT--8P. M.
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
(103 Musicians)
LEOPOLD SPOKOWSKI, Conductor
ALL TSCHAIKOWSKY PROGRAM
ADMISSION $2.00

Washington,
reports and

Jan.-
deposits

8.- Itemized
carried by

railroads, street or electric rail
ways, and steamboat companie
are required of national bank
by the comtroller of the cut
rency's call for a report of the banlk
conditions at the close of busines
December 81.
These items, included in the re
port for the first time, will furnis
valuable information to the govern
ment railroad administration and t

erma

the President de
the peace of the
Everywhere in
agreed that the Pi
great address an
sion to the views
ple as a whole. T
ion was as to wh
or a war ,speech.
both houses of co
believe that the
the terms laid do
basis for, negotia
In most quart
was no such optin
was looked upon

I L

in

PEASE AUDITORIL

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