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January 08, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

)

ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1918.

LZ

r of Li(
mmande
of thef

pect To find Final Solution
Labor Shortage By This

of

SHIP
PROGRAM

CHICAGO REMAINS
TIED UP BY SNOW
Chicago, Jan. 7.-Thirty hours after
the abatement of the unprecedented
blizzard, Chicago's streets were still
badly impeded. Traffic for the most
part was confined to the paths made
by street cars. which made uncertain
progress through canyons of snow
heaped and drifted on either side.
There was scarcely a block in the
outlying districts without its stalled
automobile, hood-high in the snow,
waiting to be shoveled out. It will be
days before normal conditions on the
streets can be obtained.
No milk trains arrived today. Pas-
senger trains arrived from one to eight
hours late. Newspaper deliveries
were curtailed probably 25 to 50 per-
cent, and one paper abandoned an
edition this afternoon because of ina-
bility to distribute it to agents.
The city weather bureau offered no
relief. It predicted flurries for Minne-
sota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Indi-
ana, and southern Michigan.

'N O

VARSITY
ROUND

DEBAT
INTO S

0-

an Is Answer
nscription

ToI

Professor
Ray

7.-Mobilization of
r agriculture, ship
)ntract plants, was
the United States
by the department
nsion of the ser-
in preparation for
ssary to carry on
in support of the
he war. Solution
e problem by this
y expected by the
nswer to sugges-
on of labor is nec-

ually rounding
test with Chic
universities in

eve
an c

en nE
c woi

SUPREME COURT Sl
ASIDE DRAT 831

'19,

DECIDES
WAR

AUTHORITY
CLAUSES OF
STITUTION

de-'

ted to be
hanics in
in hurry-
chant ma-

the

Washington, Jan. 7. --Evi
tention raised against the
draft act was swept aside by
reme court today in a unanimo
ion delivered by Chief Justik
upholding the law as consti
Authority to enact the statut
send forces to fight the enen
ever he may be found, the co
lies in the clauses of the con
giving congress the power to
war and to raise and supnori

,up-

CTon-

the

de-
own "As the
sec- army with(
-man said the c
has the consti
de- does not
such men,
dish- ilous for fi
y as No actio
rin~t-

mind
t the

.in

terms.
ge and

the ban, but
ive promin-
1 to certain
of interna-

a .separa

the

A hint of the relentlessness of the
horities in punishing infractions of
ers is contained in one notice in
ich attention is called to the fact
t the police "have been notified to
k out and to bring to ruthless pun-
ment, originators and communica-
s of untrue military, political, fin-
ial and economic reports." In an-
er notice similar warning is given
t the police "will proceed energet-
.ly" against those who repeated un-
e reports.

Hath Always
n, But Now--I

from a down-
ow, my dear,
s 9:45 by that
en we left and
10 o'clock
bit faster and

The opinion then proceeded to take
up and definitely dispose of each of the
many questions raised by counsel for
the convicted whose appeals brought
the law before the court.
GOVERNMENT COAL PRICES
BOOST PROFITS OF DEALERS
Washington, Jan. 7.-Profits of many
coal operators in the middle west were
materially increased by coal prices
fixed by the government, the senate
investigating committee was told to-
day by Clifford Thorne and David
Wing, an examiner of the federal
trade commission. Much of the short-
age of coal now experienced over the
country was attributed by Thorne to
excessive shipments to the northwest,
the temptation of operators to hold
back for higher prices, greatly in-
creased consumption, interference
with distribution through natural
channels, and an inadequate car sup-
ply. Relief, the witness said, can be
brought about only through two cours-
es, government operation of the mines
or purchase of the entire output of the
country.
In the Illinois fields some operators,
the witness asserted, are receiving
under government prices 100 per cent
more than in 1916 when the prices
were considered high.
Taxi Problem at Next Council Meeting
Alderman C. C. Freeman informed a
number of taxi men who attended last
,night's council meeting expecting that
the new taxi ordinance would be
brought up, that the ordinance would
be opened for discussion to the stu-
dents and townpeople at the next
meeting of the council.

remains clouded o
finite information c
the negotiations ar
they have entirely
ficial dispatch froi
one of the Bolshe
has been treating
and Germans in P
ing that the Bolsh
strengthening the
that the Russians
from the entente
forced to fight aga
are fighting for ar
conquest.

T

p to the door, the
the knob but it did
'ied again with the
isn't possible they
use before 10 o'clock
and the weather so

are
ing

e campus clock began solemnly to
e they counted looking at each
with that I-told-you-so expres-
But horrors! 'it didn't stop at
They stood aghast. The movie
running on central standard
and they were an hour late!

Stu
Abo

ten.
was
time

Y.
>po- Reading Appointed U. S. Commissi
nan London, Jan. 7.-Earl Reading,
ohn chief Justice, has been appointed
irge ish high commissioner in the U
lent States. Besides taking over the

lord
Brit-
fnite

Cecil Co

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