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January 05, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1918.

156 STUDENTS TO
- TAKE TELEGRAPHY

V t r

Asks $2,000,000,000

For Ships

I is

Local

Work Begins Immediately; Men Will
Spend Over Five Hours Each
Day in Class
Fifty-six students enrolled in the
telegraph code practice class which
met for the first time last night. Fif-
teen of this number are subject to
immediate call and the balance are in
class one or under age.
Practice will be held six days a
week from 2 to 4 o'clock every after-
noon and from 8 to 9:30 o'clock each
evening. The meetings are scheduled
on eastern time. Preliminary organ-
ization and introductory practice were
held last night so that the men could
begin work immediately. No more
enrollments will be made unless the
men applying are subject to call. Men
under orders will be allowed to enter
the class at any time and it is for
their special benefit that the course
was established by the Regents. They
will be given preference in every pos-
sible way. The men will practice
with bqzzers until they gain a speed
of from 10 to 15 words a minute, when
they will be given phones.
0, D-e-a-hShe's
Awfully Naive

i

Washington, Jan. 4.-Plans for a $2,000,000,000 government ship-
building program were revealed today when the shipping board ask-
ed congress for authority to place $701,000,000 worth of additional
ship contracts. At the same time an ' immediate appropriation of
$82,000,000 was asked for the extension of shipyards and for provid-
ing housing facilities for workmen.
Thus far the board has been authorized to spend for shipbuilding
$1,234,000, contracts for most of which have been awarded.
The board's housing plans call for the expenditure of about $35,-
000,000. The remainder of the 82 million dollars asked will be used
to expand shipyards already built.

is the general
faculty mem-

CAMP CUSTER MEN NOT
TO, 01 MOVED SOUTH

DELAYS
WOULD

IN TRANSPORTATION
NULLIFY BENEFITS
OF CHANGE

y, of the
e have no
affair such
others are
ud in the
ve enough
n to be

Battle Creek, Jan. 4.-Rumors are
still circulating camp that the men at
Camp Custer will be removed to
southern quarters for training. Gen-
eral Parker denies any knowledge of
a movement of this division.

not

"My dea!" she gasped, excitedly, Attention is called to the fact that

oe be- I

t because all leaning at 4 perilous angle from an
n trains are upper story window of the gyn .
ass connected "there niust be something terrlble
should travel happening, er going to happen. Look
ent business. at that big crowd of fellows gathering,
ote for social and more coming every minute, just
nited States. rushing to get there. I thought that
ernment that one was going to kill himself just
ate functions now tripping over that high railing.
view of these Oh, I do wish we could know what it
ate thing at was. If we were only men we could
.ance costing go too. It can't be a fight for they
arriages and are dividing into groups. Oh dear, I
sed with. If am so excited.
can't dance. "Well," exclaimed a calm voice at
r of music is her side, "the men, I see, are gathering
who beats for millitary drill."
s we used to

nor

I this
saing

STRICT POSTAL CENSORSHIP
AIDS IN DISCOVERING SPIES
Four German Agents Detected by Use
of New Methods of Mail
Surveillance

Of

will h
a la
f. E.

no

a

ave
rge London, Jan. 3.-Detection of four
C. notorious German spies through lab-
aw oratory methods of discovering hidden
on writing in documents, has been ac-
it complished by the efficiency of the
ny postal censorship in London, it is an-
ty. nounced, Securities worth £1,000,000
ave have been stopped in course of transit
ro- for enemy use, and 11,750,000 worth of
ich stock or bonds detained for investiga-
an tion. Enemy communication through
the mail has been completely cut off,
ns and public money has been saved by
ar- the discovery of attempts to hoard
go vital supplies, to the extent of -650,
as 000 involved in a relativrely small
ec- transaction in one important com-
is- modity. During last year ten thous-
nal and .1"cloaks" or intermediaries for
be enemy trade, have been detected and
an their activities stopped.
the The staff of the headquarters of the
be postal censorship totals 4,200 of whom
3,179 are women. Their work requires
the such education and skill that the gov-
p," ernment had difficulty in securing
st- qualified employees, and a school was
ely established to train candidates to de-
in- tect codes, secret writing, and other'
ua- subterfuges. The average number of
will letters censored each day is over 350,-
000'weighing about four tons.
Queen Mary recently spent an en-
has tertaining two hours at the headquart-
ers ers. The "uncommon language room,"
act where 150 languages, European, As-
vas iatic and African, have been read, es-
A. pecially claimed her interest,

so much of the winter has been pass-
ed in the north that not much ad-
vantage would be gained now by mov-
ing. Several weeks would be con-
sumed in transportation, during which
time there would be practically no
training. By the time the division
could be settled in the south, spring
weather in the north would be near,
with consequent good traiing wept-
er.
Instruction in gas defense com-
menced Jan. 1. Officers will take a
six-day course under Lieut. F. Nevins.
The men are progressing rapidly in
this branch of the service, and mil-
tary authorities expect that this will
be one of the best.
WASHTENAW POST REAPPEARS,
IN ENOLISH LANGUAGE WITH
MAIL PRIVILECES IN DOUBT
The Washtenaw Post yesterday ap-
peared in a re-modeled form, print-
ed in English for the first time. In
announcing that from now on the pap-
er would be English instead of Ger-
man, the editor gave as a reason that
English is the universial language of
this country.
The Post is being published by
James E. Helber who has relieved his
father, Eugene, from whom second
class mailing privileges have been tak-
en. A new application for a renewal
of the privilege was placed with the
postoffice department at Washington
last October, but no word has as yet
been received in regard to it. The
abandonment of the German language
is liable to complicate matters for the
publisher who may be compelled to
make an entirely new application.
STEAMSHIP ROOSEVELT BRINGS
BIG CARGO FROM SEAL ISLANDS
Washington, D. C., Jan. 4.-The gov-
ernment steamship Roosevelt is on her
wray to Seattle with a full cargo of
sealskins, seal meat, and other pro-
ducts from the Seal Islands, having
successfully carried out the novel and
dangerous task of carrying coal and
other supplies to the islands ihi the
middle of the winter.
Commisioner H. M. Smith of the
Bureau of Fisheries, Department of
Commerce, reports that as a result of
the trip the natives are well fortified
against the severe weather that has
already set in and will be much more
comfortable and contented in cnse-
quence. Great difficulty wab exper-
ienced in unloading supplies and tar :
ing on the island products, as the.
Bering sea was constantly swept Ly
tempestuous winds.
The return cargo consists of 4,2583
sealskins, and various casks of corned
seal .meat and other products, as well
as $3,500 sacks of bones which wail
weigh between 350,000 and 400,000
pounds.

NEWS oF RUss PEACE
CONFERENCGE LAKING
HUN'S ALLIES DISLIKE itER AT-
TITUDE AT LAS'
MEETING
(Latest War Developments as Prepar-
ed by the Associated Press)
Although the peace conference be-
tween representatives of the Bolshe-
viki government and the central pow-
ers was due to reconvene Friday, no
news has come through indicating
whether the meeting took place.
Neitherwhave their been any advices
as to whether the difficulties in the
way of reaching an agreement have
been surmounted, or if concessions by
either side, making possible further
negotiations, are intended.
Hun's Allies Dissatisfied
Dissatisfaction with the proposals of
the central powers apparently does
not exist solely on the side of the Bol-
sheviki government, but eilsts among
the delegates of the central powers as
well. Austria, Bulgaria and Turkey
are asserted to have disagreed with
the domineering attitude of the Ger-
mans at the peace conference where
they posed as conquerors, while their
allied delegates evinced an eager de-
sire for peace and a disposition to
compromise.
Fronts Comparatively Caln .
On all fronts the comparative' calm
of the past few days, continues, al-
though the Germans in the Cambrai
sector in local attacks have pushed
back four British advanced posts for
short distances. The artillery duels
along the western front in France and
Belgium and also Italy are still going,
but the infantry is virtually idle.
Again there has been considerable
fighting in the air on the western
front. The German war office asserts
that German aviators during the last
week have accounted for 2 allied
airplanes. French aviators have
brought down eight machines.
The American army in France i. to
be reinforced by the American avia-
tors who became famous as llots in
French escadrilles. Thirey-two men,
mostly members of the Lafayetts
squadron, will be the first to te
sworn into the American army.
CONTRIBUTIONS TO UNIVERSITY
UNION - REACH TOTAL OF $62

POST-OFFICE SELLS
MANY WAR STAMPS
Receipts in Mailing Stamps Exceeds
Those for Same Period in
1916
The Ann Arbor postoffice has sold
$1,166.61 worth of thrift and govern-
ment savings stamps during the month
of December. The war revenue stamps
brought in $279.
The receipts in government mail-
ing stamps were $895.63 more during
December, 1917, than during the same
month in 1916, last month having
brought in $15,211.97 as against that
of $14,316.34 of the year 1916.
Complete reports of the last quart-
er have not yet been made due t the
delay in statements from the branch
offices. A full report will be ready for
publication next week.
Presbyterian Church Changes Time
The Presbyterian church will be-
gin the morning service Sunday at
10:30 o'clock on eastern time. The
theme is, "The Essential Element in
Religion," and the sermon will be giv-
en by the Rev. Leonard A. Barrett.
'S
Japan Will No t
O. K. D1olsheiki
Washington, Jan. 4.-Nothing of the
reported intention of the Japanese
government to extend recognition to
the bolsheviki has been heard by the
state department and the Japanese
embassy is equally ignorant on the
subject. In view of the complete un-
derstanding that has existed between
the entente allies, it is said here that
it is certain Japan would not take the
initiative in recognizing the bolshe-
viki without full conference with her
allies and America. State department
officials say there have been no nego-
tiations on the subject to this point
Close attention, however, is being
given to the question of statu of the
bolsheviki regime and from private
statements of officials it is gathered
that a decision will be reached pretty
soon as an outcome of the meeting of
the constituent assembly in Petro-
grad. If that body appears to be rep
resentative of the will of the Russian
people and gives promise of being able
to maintain a real government willing
to respect international oblgations,
the chance of recognition will be ex-
cellent.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB TO HEAR.
NATIONAL CONVENTION REPORT
Future Policies and Work of Society
for Coming Year Will be Dis-
cussed
Reports on the national convention
of the Association of Cosmopolitan
clubs, which was held during the
Christmas recess at Oberlin college,
will be given at the meeting of the
University Cosmopolitan club tonight
by five of the members who were pre-
sent. The meeting will be held at 7:30
o'clock in Lane hall and all members
are exepected to be present. There
will be a discussion of the reports and
plans will be made for the future
policy and activities ,of the club
throughout the coming year.
It is the purpose of the Cosmopoli-
tan club to promote friendly relations
between people from all nations, and
any who are interested are invited to
attend t e meetings.
RIESS, '20, NOW BUSINESS
MANAGER OF THE GARGOYLE

Walter S. Riess, '20, has been of-
ficially appointed business manager
of the Gargoyle. Riess' promotion
from assistant business manager fol-
lows the resignation of N. H. Ibsen,
ex-'18E, who resigned from t* man-
agerial position to enter the service.
At a recent meeting of the board in
control of student publications, Prof.
Fred N. Sdott was authorized to ap-
point Riess in the event of Ibsen's
resignation.

Carriers To
of Aver

Washington, Jan. 4.-
regulate the governme
of railroads and to guar
riers compensation on
their average operatin
the last three years wag
gres today by Presiden
address to both houses i
Bills embodying his re
and carrying an ap
$500,000,000 as a "re,
were introluced and a
be made to rush them
sake.
While the president'
with general approval
crats and republicans
tion is likely to devel
duction to the administ
federal control continue
indefinitely or until cc
otherwise.
M'Adoo Holds Cc
While the legislative
set moving, Director G
spent a busy day planm
of labor questions with
four brotherhoods. He
ed to leave the brother
demand for a general
to an advisory toard of
to be appointed by him
In his address to cong
Wilson, announcing iis
ing over the railroads, p
in which railroad exec
work in an attempt to u
under private manager
the war emergency dem
ernment action. Only
ment administration,
said, could an aboslutely
unembarassed common
of all lines and facilitie
that "the common admi
be carried o with as lit
of the present operating
and personnell of the
possible" and repeated
given in his pi oclamia
that owners of railrc
should not suffer fina
cause of the new plan
To Appropriate $5
When the president
administration bill was
both houses. In -additic
ating $500,000,000 to p
compensation basis un

50

FEDERAL CONT
LEFT TO
OF C
BROTHERH
FOR WA

PHIYSICAL
YATI(

th

:e to see t
the J-Ho
yer. "Ea
p absolut
w of the
our situ
itudents w

Prof. )Ioritz Levi Cormends
to Sipport Clubhouse in
France

Efforti

1918 J-Hop h
junior enginee
committee toa
tee which w
the holidays.
irman, had sta
Live plans for
t he is note
he University t

Continued subscriptions to the $1,000
Daily fund for the American Univer-
sity Union in Europe yesterday
brought the total to date to $62.
In a letter with his contribution,
Prof. Moritz Levi of the French de-
partment said: "I enclose $5 for our
fine undertaking, 'The American Uni-
versity Union in Europe, Michigan
bureau.' This work cannot fail to be
crowned with success."
Subscriptions to date:
Previously acknowledged ......$41.50

Like a giant
separating the p
the unfit, has bro
ation in regard I
of efficiency in t
nation. Men in t
should be at the 1
cal vigor, have f
of rejected men,
deformities, and 1
and neglect, dec
department of he
publication, "The
The draft has
influences on pu
turned attent ion
sive work to reli
ties and prevent
sharply indicated
and systematic p]
d hLCd, 1avnla

rt-
an
ex-
his

DETROIT COLLEGIATE ALUMN U
TO HOLD PATRIOTIC MEETING

OPT
TIA

Mass meeting for the promotion
of patriotic education among women
,S will be held at. 3 o'clock Jan. 6 at
TE Temple Beta El in Detroit, under
the auspices of the collegiate alum-
ea nae association,
ate Mrs. Loi3 K. Matthews, president
is. of the association, and Mrs. Gertrude
ng Martin, executive secretary, are
ige among the speakers. All Michigan
women are urged to attend and are
1m invited by the Detroit branch of the
Las collegiate alumnae to a tea given di-
her ,antlafter the mass meeting at the

Harold R. Smith............
Bernard Wohl ..............
Prof. Moritz Levi...... . . ..
Public Croesus..... ..... . ..
Friend....................
Reader.......... .......
Interested .....................

1.00
1.00
5.00
5.00
2.50
1.00
5.00

Total .....................$62.00
L G. Hal.'I1E Cues to Traiini('nCm

d theae
still usi

anz
Pacific Coast To Have New Canneries nee
Washington, D. C., Jan. 4.-Accord- of1
ng to information received by the bu- ace
reau of fisheries, department of com- me
merce, a whaling company on the Pa-. ph
cific coast is planning to erect two sul
canneries to be operated next season,
each with a capacity of 30,000 cases. he
The same company will also operate un

t as. reevaied
cessity of a. r
the body. Mu(

J. "a. a 1, JO : , 7C i aaaI ~ a
Churches Adopt Eastern Time . J. Guy Hall, ex-'18E, who has re-
The official board of the Baptist cently spent 'a few days visiting here,
church decided at a meeting yester- is among the men chosen at Camp
day to run on eastern standard time. Custer for the officers' training camp.
The Methodist church also has decided He is a brother of Lieut. Roy Hall of
to follow this plan. Fort Sheridan:

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