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January 04, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-04

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ASSOCIAT
PRESS
D AY AND NIGHT
'B SERVICE

ANN ARBOR,MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1918.

PRICE THR

_

Is

to Re-

MAY PUT ENGLAND
ON RATION BASIS
Food' Controller Believ-es it Must
Come; 1Departmiet orksOut
System
London, Jan. 3.-Compulsory ration-
ing is to be put into effect in Eng-
land at an early day according to
Lord Rhonda, the food controller, in
a speech today. He prefaced his an-
nouncement by saying that he was'
afraid that compulsory rationing
would have to comne and that it was.
on its way.
He then declared that his depart-
ment had completed a scheme and
that as soon as the sanction of the
cabinet had been received it would be
carried out. He warned his hearers
that there, wouild continue to be a
shortage, though the position would
improve steadily.
"There is nothing alarming in the
situation," he said. "You have only
to tighten your belts. The people of
this country are undergoing nothing
like the privations in Germany. There
they have less than a pound of meat
a week.' .
LIEUT. MULLEN REMAINS
IN CHRGE OF TAININ
WAR DEPARTMENT SENDS LIEU-
TENANT COLONEL HOWE TO
NEW YORK CITY

of the

eviki for
t hostili-
by the
."t, even
aratively
prise and
ienna.

rman
otia-
sent
r the
e the
thc

proposals of
the .leads of
actions have
sm to those
call for the
uania, C'ur-
nox in pos-

Lieut. G. C. Mullen has finally been
placed in charge of the officers' re-
serve corps at the University, accord-
ing to information recently received
from the war department in Washing-
ten. Lieutenant Mullen will continue
as professor of military science and
tactics and commandant of the Uni-
versity cadets.
Lieut.Losey Williams will remain
as an assistant to Lieutenant Mullen.
The detail of Lieutenant-Colonel
Howe, who arrived in Ann Arbor just
before the Christmas holidays, has
been withdrawn bythe war depart-
ment. Lieutenant Howe i; now iii
New York City.

MCA1DOO TO STOP
US ELES TRAINS
Hundreds of Trains on Railroads in
East to be Withdrawn
Soon
CONSIDERS U. S. OPERATION
OF EXPRESS COMPANIESi
President Wilson to Propose Basis for
Compensating Roads Under
Control
Washington, Jan. 3.- Hundreds of
passenger trains on railroads east of
the Mississippi will be withdrawn from
service under orders soon to be is-
sued by Director General McAdoo bas-
ed upon specific recommendation made
today by a committee of eastern pass-
enger traffic officers. The committee
was divided as to the advisability of
withdrawing most parlor and sleeping
cars, leaving only those considered
necessary for important travel routes.
Discuss Labor Hours
Hours of labor of railroad employ-
ees under government operation was
discussed by the director general to-
day with heads of the four railway
union brotherhoods and the questions
of wages will be taken up at further
conferences tomorrow.
Tomorrow President Wilson goes be-
fore congress with recommendations
for legislation providing a basis for
compensating railroads under govern-
ment operation and for continued fin-
ancing with government assistance.
Bills approved by the railroad admin-
istration will be introduced immedi-
ately and indications are that they
will be rushed to speedy passage.
May Take Over Express Service
Mr. McAdoo now is considering
whether express companies should be
taken over for government operation,
and has received from his legal ad-
visers opinions Qn the proper proced-
ure in case he decides this is- nec-
essary to maintain the highest effic-
iency.
DETROIT NEWS TO CONTAIN
ARTICLE BY PROF. WENLEY
-Students Asked To Communicate With
Writer After Reading
Treatise
The forthcoming issue of the Detroit
Sunday News (Jan. .6) will contain an
article by Professor R. M. Wenley, en-
titled "Student Temperament and the
War." Professor Wenley attempts to
present the reaction of undergraduate
sentiment to the national crisis. He
hopes that ,after reading the article
carefully, students will communicate
with him, giving any information
which may help him to further con-
clusions on the subject. The cross-
currents are so numerous that it as
difficult to arrive at conclusions in-
clusive of all states of mind.
GREAT LAKES STATION GETS
FIVE NEW Y. M. C. A. BUILDINGS
Great Lakes, Ill., Jan. 1 --Jackies
a, Great Lakes and Captain William
A. Moffett, the commandant, are re-
joicing over the receipt of a Christ-
mas gift from the bureau of naviga-
tion in the form of several now build-
ings for the training station.
Captain Moffett has been informed
in a letter from the navy department
that work is soon to be started on

live new V. M. C. A. buildings, each
to be equipped with a swimming tank,
a new mess hall, an officers' quarters
building, and a new postoffice build-
ing-

STRT RECRUITING
E TH
Chief Guuners Mate Harold Pelham.
'17, Will Enlist Students
Here
WILL FORM THIRD DIVISION 1
COMPOSED OF MICHIGAN MEN
1,500 Additional Sailors Needed at
Once For Reserve
Force
Michigan men may enlist in the navala
reserves Sunday when Chief Gunner's1
Mate Haroid Pelham, '17, will be ata
the Delta Tau Delta house to sign
up men who have had work on rifle;
ranges. The men will be sent at
once to Camp Logan, Zion City, Ill.,
which is at present in charge of En-
sign Staatz Abrams, '17E, and En-
sign Carl Mason, ex-'19. The enlisted
men will learn the work at the camp
and then will be sent to the ranges
along the Atlantic coast, practicaliy
in the same manner as the old naval
militia conducted its training and or-
ganization.
This is the first step in the organi-
zation of a corps of naval reserves
from the University. This will be the
third division composed -of Michigan
men exclusively.
Need 1,500 Men
The naval reserve force needs about
1,500 additional men at present and
recruiting will be pushed with added
vim. Men serving in this corps will
be in the service of the navy just as
much as those on the regular navy
rolls. The uniform and equipment of
the reserve are the same as those of
the other branches of the navy.
Enlistment in the naval reserve was
not closed on Dec. 15, as is the general
opinion, but men of draft age will still
be accepted providing their order in
the draft number list is low enough
to warrant their release by the exemp-
tion boards. Men must be in Class 1
or in a deferred class. Blanks have
been provided to be filled out by re-
cruiting officers, and others to be
filled out by exemption boards to pro-
vide for the enlistment of men of draft
age. Enrollment in the marine corps
or regular navy will be made under
the same provisions.
Draft Number Must Be Low
Men who wish to enlist should se-
sure application blanks from the re-
cruiting office which can be presented
0 their exemption boards and in re
turn filed by the recruiting officer.
The blank to be filled out by the ex-
emption boards states that the appli-
cant's number is low and that he is
not within the current quota at the
time of call and is free to enlist in the
naval reserve force. The recruiting
officer's blank states that the named
man has been examined by the en-
rolling officer and enrolled in the re-
serve.
New Interpretration Given
The new interpretation of the rule
was made by Major J. S. Easby-Smith,
assistant executive officer of the war
department. This will allow many
more men to enlist in the Michigan
corps than could if the draft age rule
prevented their being released by their
boards. Details of organization of the
division will be announced later.
MINNESOTA TO HAVE LARGEST
SERVICE FLAG IN NORTHWEST

BUZZER CLASS WILL
ORGANIZE TONIGHT
Instruction W"Ill Be Given In General
Service and Continental
Telegraph Codes
The first meeting of the new service
telegraph code class recenty author-
ized by the Board of Regents will be
held tonight in room 105, Engineer-
ing building, under the direction of
Mr. Porter H. Evans of the engineer-
ing faculty.
The work of the class will be to
learn and practice tihe continental
and general service codes of wireiess
telegraphy by means of buzzer appar-
atus. Theory of radio work will not
be taken up in this class but will be
given in a separate course to be elect-
ed independently.
Enrollment in this class is primar-
ily open to men who will be called in-
to service at an early date. Men who
will be drafted soon or who will be
placed in training camps will be es-
pecially catered to in the acceptance
of applications. Those wno have
passed their examinations and are
subject to immediate call are wanted
i. the course. The list i3 rapidly
filling and those wishing to elect the
work should enroll tonight.
FUND FOR UNIVERSITI
UNION' TOTALS 541, 60

CROWOER 0
DRAFT FOR
21 , JUNE
ARMIES WILL STIL
FROM MEN IN

CONTRIBUTIONS

RECEIVED

BY

es-

I

QUOTAS FROM STA'
DETERMINED BY
Report .Million Still Availabl
Present Registration
Laws
Washington, Jan. 3.-All me:
war armies still to be raised
United States will come fro
one under the new selective
plan. This means the nation
ing is to be done by young m
out families dependent upon t
or for support and unskilled
essary industrial or agricultur
Provost Marshal General Crov
nounced the new policy in an
tive report upon the operation
selective draft law submitted
Secretary Baker and sent to c
Will Provide Needs
He says class one should
men for all military needs of t
try, and to accomplish that o
urges amendment of the draf
as to provide that all men i
reached 21 since Juhe 5, 19
be required to register for. c
tion. Also, in the interest of
tribution of the military bu
proposes that the quotas c
or districts be determined her(
the basis of the number of
class one and not upon popu
Million Available
Available figures indicate, ti
says, that there are one millioi
ally and otherwise unqualified
der the present registration
be found in class one when
tionaires have been returned
classification period ends Jan
this, the extention of registi
men turning 21 since June 1
year and thereafter, will ad
effective men a year.

DAILY RANGE FROM ONE TO
TEN DOLLARS
Subscriptions to The Daily fund for
the American University Union in
Europe have already reached a total
of $41.50, nearly all of which has been
received since vacation.
This sum is a part of the $1,000 ask-
ed by Prof. C. B. Vibbert, now in Paris
with the, Union. Students have been
the most liberal subscribers to date,
Bruce Millar, ex-'19, now in aviation
service, heads the list with a sum of
$10.
All persons wishing to contribute
may call at the office, or send their
amounts through the mails. Checks
should be made payable to the "Amer-
ican University Union in Europe, Mich''
igan Bureau." President H. B. Hutch-
ins is in general charge of the fund,
and will forward moneys to Professor
Vibbert from time to time.
Following is the list of contribu-
tors:
Henry Kraemer..............$ 5.00
Bruce Millar ... ..... ....10.00
Francis Bacon................5.00
C. P. Emery-........5.00
J.' E. Campbell. ........ ..1.00
Homer L. Heath ................ 5.00
Bruce A. Swaney.............1.00
Anonymous.. ................2.50
Paul E. Cholette .................1.00
Reader ...................... 5.00
Walter S. Riess...............1.00

but bow.-
le propor-'

HERO OF THE MERRIMAC WILL
SPEAK HERE SUNDAY NIGHT
R. P. Hobson Will Talk at Presbyter-
ian Church in Interests of
Prohibition

ecurred
driving
'n bankj

of the Former Congressman Richmond
Pearson Hobson of Alabama, will
speak on "War Time Prohibition," at
ND 7:30 o'clock Sunday night in the Pres-
BURG byterian church of this city. This
will be one of the patriotic dry rallies
mittee conducted by the anti-saloon league of
America.
I Captain Hobson won his fame as the
hero of the Merrimiac in Santiago -har-
bors during the Spanish-American war.
socia- He is also well known as the cham-
a, and pion of temperance in congress while
eld at a member of that body.
week, Sunday's lecture will be the second
;hlers, to be delivered by Mr. Hobson in this
New- city. The meeting Will be open to the
1 Prof. public.
sident COURT QUASHES INDICTMENT
niG.tAGAINST CONGRESSMAN NELSON

Analyze First Draft
Analyzing the first draft,
Crowder shows that of the to
istration of 9,586,508 the numt
ed for examination was 3,082
of these 1,057,363 were cert
the boards for military servic
the first call was for only 687,
there now remain 370,363 me
ing summons to the mol
camps.
Of all men examined 730,75
per cent were rejected for
reasons.
Abauot one-half of all me
or 1,560,570, claimed exempti
claims of 78 per cent of the
granted, showing in the or
officials that very few fr
claims were filed.

br Madison, Wis., Jan. 3.-The indict-
> ment charging Congressman John M.
. Nelson and his son Byron Nelson with
- conspiracy to evade the selective
ed law was quashed by Judge Carpenter
y of Chicago in federal court this. after-
k noon on the ground that it was faulty
and insufficient.
gs The government may take the mat.
or ter to the circuit court of appeals.

Total....................$41.50
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS CAUSE
MAIL TIE-UP AT GREAT LAKES
Great Lakes, Ill., Jan. 3.-Christ-
mas at Great Lakes extended over a
period seldom equalled in civilian
life. This will explain to many wives,
sweethearts,. and friends why they
have not received a letter of thanks
from the jackle to whom a present
was sent. Santa Claus was away be-
hind in his deliveries.
When Christmas was several days
past there were still several "thousand
packages of mail undelivered. So
rapidly did the mail accumulate that
it was impossible for a force double
the ordinary size to sort and deliver
the many gifts sent to the boys in
training at Great Lakes.

tlett, Profess

FEDERAL INCOME '1
TO BE HERE JAN

Newcombe, and
Pittsburg united
asiga for the es-
d wide journal of
It is hoped to
fore' the end of
s displacing the
this character.
was elected one of
organize the pro-
aemer was elect-
'tment of pharin-

Mexican Bandits Again Raid Ranch
Marfa, Tex., Jan. 3.-Another raid
by Mexican bandits occurred today at
the Brite Ranch 35 miles southwest
of here and an equal distance from
Valentine, Tex, according to reports
received at the military headquarters
of the Big Bend- district. No details
of the raid were given. Fhis ranch
was raided Christmas morning by
Mexican bandits and one American
and two Mexicans were killed.
Dr. H. R.. John Enters U. S. Service
Dr. H. R. John, recently appointed
physician at the University health
service, was called Monday to enter
oenmant srviee at the Louisville

The new 'mess hall is to contain a
swimming tank, a gymnasium and a
lecture room. The officers' building
will permit many of the commissioned
officers now living "ashore" to make
their home at the station. The new
postoffice building will be near the
main gate and will include quarters
for the telegraph and telephone com-
panies. The latter building is to cost
$40,000.
Lane Hall Changes To Eastern Time
In accordance with the U,'-fversity
system, Lane hall has also shifted its
time schedule to eastern standard
time. The appointment committee will
observe the following hour: on week
days: 8 to 9, 1 to 2, and 5 to 6 o'clock.
On Saturdays the hours will -be from

Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 3.-Work
on, the largest service flag in the
Northwest is well under way. "Co-
eds" of the University of Minnesota
have measured and cut material for
the immense emblem which is to bear
a star for each of the 600 students of,
the institution who have entered the
service of the United States. It Is
to be 15 by 35 feet.
Students in the department of home
economics are making the ba iground.
When it is completed colunteer work-
ers are to stitch on the stars. Mater-
ial for the flag was purchased from
the $200 proceeds of a military ball
at the university.
Sammies Not In Need of Home Food
Friends and'families of soldiers are
requested by the council of national
defense to send no more food to sol-
diers in training camps and canton-
ments. Wholesome food is supplied
to the men, and much of that which
is sent spoils in heated express cars
and results in waste.

Will Give Advice On Makint
come Returns to All
Apply
It is announced by James
collector of internal revenu
federal income tax officer v
the Ann Arbor court house
14 to 26, inclusive, to helf
subject to the income tax
their returns without any co:
for his services.
It is estimated that ther
1,300 persons in Washtena
subject to the tax.
Returns of income for 191
made on forms provided for
pose before March 1, 1918.
a great many pjeople do n
stand the law and will not'l
to make out their returns, ti
ment is sending in this expe
for them. But the duty is o
payer to make himself knov
does not do as required in tb
time he may have to pay

MINNESOTA. WILL GIVE MEDALS
TO 1,300 STUDENTS IN SERVICE
Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 3.-Every
former student of the University oV:
Minnesota in the military service will
receive a medal of honor bearing the
recipient's name. A committee nas
been appointed by President Marion
L. Burton to raise the necessary funds.
It is estimated the 1,500 men will
receive badges, the design for which
is being worked out by students of
the architectural department. In 1898,'
the University of Minnesota men who
were in the Spanish-American war re-

rang
jail.
are
sho'
mis
T

is

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