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October 07, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-07

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._ _ _ _ .

FHE WEATHER
RTLY CLOIJDY-PROB-
ABLY WARMER

11 A

att

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VIII. No. 6.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1917.

PRICE THREE CENTS

CONGRESS CLOSES
DISLOYA9LITY CASE
EXTRAORDINARY SESSION OF
HOUSE BEGAN APRIL
SECOND
PUT THROUGH GRIST
OF LATE LEGISLATION

Kellog and Fall, Republicans, a
Robinsony Democrat, Reply
to La Follette

and

Washington, Oct. .-In the midst of
the hearing of the alleged disloyalty
charges of Senator La Follette of Wis-
consin, the extraordinary session of
congress which began April 2 was ad-
journed at 3 o'clock today.
Criticism of the Wisconsin senator
which took up the entire day marked
the close of the war session, including
the presence of President Wilson. The
usual eleventh hour grist of legisla-
tion was put through and tonight most
of the members were enroute home to
wait the next session which begins
next December.
Senator Kellog of Minnesota and
Fall of New Mexico, Republicans, and
Robinson of Arkansas, Democrat, re-
plyed to Mr. La Follette..
HUN KRUPPS PLAY
ON BRITISH FRONT
English Gain Defense Positions Which
Germans Held After Thurs-
day Attack
Our guns are in action on the Fland-
era front with indication that the Ger-
mans as usual are playing their's.
Field Marshal Haig on Friday men-
tions only the increase of the German
artillery, failing to reveal what his
own plans are. Press reports show
that the Germans are suffering heav-
ily from these attacks of the British
artillery fire. More of the defense
positions to which they were still
clinging after Thursday's attack have
become the objective of the British at-
tack. The Germans are still trying
to regain their lost ground near Ver-
dun.
GALLI-CURCI TO BE STAR OF
FIRST PRE-FESTIVAL CONCERT
The first of the series of concerts
to be given this season will be held
Thursday evening, Oct. 11 when Mne.
Amelita Galli-Curci, the distinguished
Spanish-Italian coloratura soprano
will be heard. Thursday's program
contains a number of famous smaller
songs, and several of the great arias
which are written especially for col-
orature voices. Mme. Galli-Curci will
be assisted by Manuel Berenguer,
flutist, and Homer Samuels, pianist.
Other artists of the series will Eu-
gene Ysaye, the Belgian violinist, who
comes Nov. 9. Ethel Lebinska, the
"Paderewski of women pianists," ap-
pearing Dec. 10; and the New York
Symphony orchestra, conducted by
Walter Damrosch, which will make its
Ann Arbor debut on Jan. 16. The pre-
festival series will be brought to a
close Feb. 15, by Julia Culp, the emin-
ent Dutch "lieder" singer, in a re-
cital.
The May festival, consisting of six
concerts, will take place about the
middle of that month as usual. The
details regarding the programs have
not been arranged, but will be an-
nounced later.
Sixty Apply for Army Stores Course
Sixty applications have been re-
cieved by Prof. J A. Bursley for the
third course in army stores methods
course starting Nov. 3. This is the
largest number of applicants Profess-
or Burley has ever received four
weeks before the commencement of a

LIBERTY LOANERS
TO BANQUET HERE
Two Hundred Fifty Washtenaw Coun-
ty Workers to Convene
Monday
A banquet will be given the 250
men and women Liberty loan workers
from Washtenaw county Monday even-
ing, Oct. 8, at 6 o'clock, at the city
Y. M. C.A. George W. Millen, chair-
man of county committee, is to be
chairman of the evening, and the prin-
cipal speakers are Frederick R. Fen-
ton, chairman Federal Reserve bank
of Chicago; A. E. Larned, director of
speakers for Detroit; George Monahan
and Roy Vance of Detroit, Warden Ed-
ward A. Ferinsdorf of Jackson, Prof.
W. D. Henderson, Lieutenant Watt of
Rhode Island, who has just returned
from service in France, and Francis
Bacon, '02, director of social activities
of the Union.
"When the workers hear these men
they'll go out and sell bonds to a
fence post if they are to have no one
else to sell them to," said F. L. Pack,
secretary of the county committee, in
commenting upon the speakers.
The Michigan Union executive com-
mittee, in charge of the sale of bonds,
will be present at the banquet to com-
plete their plans for a campaign
among the students.
ADOPTION OF HONOR.
SYSTEM IS PTIONAL
OFFICIALS OF UNIVERSITY GIVE
VIEWS ON QUES-
TION
Michigan may have an honor sys-
tem if -the students here desire it.
However, the proposition rests entire-
ly with the student body, according to
a partial census taken among the
deans and officials of the various
schools and colleges yesterday after-
noon.
Registrar Arthur G. Hall expressed
the sentiment of all those who were
interviewed quite completely when he
said:F
"The faculty does not think much
of an honor system which comes be
cause of the desire of the faculty to
have such a system. The proposition
rests altogether with the student body.
When the students here find out what
kind of a system they want and show
that they want it, the faculty will for
the most part be entirely willing to
co-operate."
In the College of Pharmacy there is
considerable objection to such a sys-
tem, and the system was not tried last
year when a few classes in other col-
leges and departments tested it. One
of the prominent members of the fac-
ulty of this college said that the sys-
tem would not be tried for some time
to come in this college.
Dean Marcus L. Ward of the Col-
lege of Dental Surgery said:
"We did not try the system last year
because of the fact that there was
considerable strong feeling among a
minority of the students. The faculty
ruled last year that the honor sys-
tem should not be installed until there
was an unanimous vote among the
men of the college in favor of it. The
system will not be used here, how-
ever, until there is not only a .unani-
mous 'vote but also considerable en-
thusiasm for the measure."
Deans John R. Effinger and Wil-
bert B. Hinsdale of the Colleges of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts and

Homoeopathic Medicine, respectively,
were both out of the city and could
not be interviewed on the question.
There is considerable opinion among
both the students and faculty on the
entire campus that an honor system
should be in favor not only at exam-
ination time but should govern the
conduct at student activities, at
quizzes, on the athletic field, and other
times.

STUDENTS URGED
TO TAKE DRILL
Lieut. G. C. Mullen Asks Those Who
Plan to Drop Course to
Continue Work
U. IFORMS WILL ARRIVE
WITHIN NEXT SIX WEEKS
Faculty Members Requested to Assist
in Giving Military Instruction
to Students
"Every Michigan man should con-
sier it a sense of duty to his country
to enroll in the military courses this
fall," said Lieut. G. C. Mullen in a
recent interview. "At the presnt time
there are a number of students who
are enrolled that desire to drop the
course of instruction. To those stu-
dents I want to say that it is a duty
for them to fit themselves for the
high service they can render their
country in the hour of need.
"The man who takes military drill
this semester has a wonderful oppor-
tunity to improve his knowledge of
military science and tactics, which
will make him better equipped if
drafted. This is especially so if the
student is trained for an officer's com-
mission.
Enrolling Shows Loyalty
"If the student, without sufficient
excuse, does not undertake the prob-
lem of improving his knowledge along
military lines, when the opportunity
is offered, he may be looked upon as
a disloyal citizen or favoring the
enemy.
'Naturally, no student wishes to be
termed a disloyal citizen or consider
himself as favoring the enemy.
"Aside from the mental benefit one
derives from the course, there is a vast
amount of physical benefit. The work
is practically all out of doors, except
when the weather is inclement. The
students that claim they lack suf-
ficient time usually spend their spare
time in the movies, at dances or in
other places of amusement. This time
could easily be devoted to military
training. The physical work will be
in charge of Dr. May of Waterman
gymnasium.
"Uniforms will be furnished within
the next six weeks. They will be
worn by the majority of the students
the entire day. The man who does
not have a uniform on will be looked
upon as a slacker, unless he has an
excellent reason.
Letters Sent to Faculty
"I am sending letters to every mem-
ber of the faculty asking them for as-
sistance in making military instruc-
tion, not only possible for every man,
but so popular that it will be prac-
tically universal. I wish to make
it clear to all that I am not asking
this for any personal or selfish mo-
tive, for manifestly I can drill and
give instruction to a class of, say, 500
or less much more easily than I can
to one of 2,000 or more."
No credit is given to Lieutenant
Mullen by the war department or any
increase of pay or tank for any ef-
fort to get more men to take this
course. Under strict interpretation of
war department orders Lieutenant
Mullen only is obliged to give three
hours work each week, but he has
asked for and been granted one and
a half hours each day for five days
(Continued on page four)

PRES. H. B. HUTCHINS
FROWNS ON HAZING
Says Disorderly Conduct Is Viewed
with Disfavor by State
Officials
"Hazing which has been in vogue
on State street since the beginning of
the semester has outgrown its limits
and should be curbed at once. Such
actions are looked upon with disfavor
by officials at Lansing who are op-
posed to appropriating money for the
University if the students persist in
conducting themselves so disorderly."
This was the substance of the ad-
monition to the freshmen and sopho-
mores given by President Harry B.
Hutchins at the meeting of underclass-
men in University Hall Friday after-
noon.
"I say this not in an antagonistic
way," continued the president, "but in
the spirit of a friendly advisor. The
University provides for regulated
games between the lower classes and
the students need not look for other
sports."
At the opening of the meeting the
president dealt with the matter of
military training and urged all stu-
dents who could possibly .take the
course given by Lieut. G. C. Mullen to
do so. He also counciled the students
to do their utmost to aid the govern-
ment in this present time of stress.
"The best way the student can serve
his country at the present time is to
stay at his post and wait, until he is
called. He needn't join the colors im-
mediately to be patriotic."
FIRST YEAR WOMEN TO HOLD
CLASS MEETING ON MONDAY
Girls of the freshmen class will be
the guests of Dean Myra B. Jordan
from 5 to 6 o'clock Monday afternoon
in Barbour gymnasium. This is the
first social gathering of the class of
1921. Mrs. Harry B. Hutchins, Mrs.
John R. Effinger, Miss Louise Potter,
Miss Grace Greenwood, Miss Agnes
Wells, and Miss Marion Hollands, so-
cial directors of the dormitories; Miss
Alice Evens, Miss Marion Wood, and
Miss Helen Dawley of the athletic de-
partment; Dr. Ethel Boland, and Dr.
Eloise Walker will assist Mrs. Jordan
in the receiving line.
At this meeting the representatives
of the judiciary council will be elect-
ed. The junior advisors will be host-
esses from 6 to 9 o'clock and will have
charge of the supper and entertain-
ment following.
Anna McMahon, '19, general chair-
man, assisted by Hester Reed, '19, and
Helen Osband, '19, are making plans
for 350 guests.
Prof. C. L. Meader to Make Address
Prof. C. L. Meader of the general
linguistics department will give an
illustrated lecture on "Russia, the
World Democracy," at 6:30 o'clock
this evening before the Students' so-
ciety of the Unitarian church, corner
of State and Huron streets.

Tearless Co-eds
Advance Bravely
Female Students Aspire to Fame on
Staff of Humorous Mag-
azine
All hail!
Women to the front!
No, this is not to be a "slogan of
death," but an association of very
peaceful females. They have formed
no organization, but will be known as
"The Co-editors of the Gargoyle."
Is this not a radical step for the
fearless co-eds to make? Is it not
an indication of courage that they
brave the ire of a publication which
has heretofore maintained a policy
approaching anti-feminism? Yea,
verily.
To be specific, four women are try-
ing out for the staff of the humorous
magazine. Not in recent years has, the
Gargoyle ever been so beseiged by
would-be editors of the fairer sex.
With women on the staff, the cam-
pus is looking forward to a "Suff-
rage Number," a "Knitting Number"
and even a "Culinary Number."
SOLDIER' IBRAIES _3
RECEIE1500 BOOKS
FICTION, TEXT BOOKS, AND MAG-
AZINES NEEDED
BADLY
Have you any old text-books? Then
take them to the librarian's office,
in the basement of the University li
brary.
The campaign for books for the
libraries being established for the men
enlisted in military service is turn-
ing out to be a success, with over 1,500
volumes already contributed. The
canvass for money for the upkeep of
the libraries has not begun, but will
be started actively about October 15.
Fiction, books on electricity, engi-
neering, aviation, and other technical
subjects are wanted badly, and a spe-
cial plea has been made for French
grammars, dictionaries, and story-
books. Magazines are also needed, al-
though any over two years old will
not be taken.
It is hoped that no one will see fit
to give old, badly printed books. In
some places people seem to have
racked their attics for the old books
that used to be popular "when father
was a boy." Books in fairly good con-
dition, however, will be welcomed.
Libraries Co-operate
In waging this campaign, the Li-
brary war council, appointed by the
secretary of war. This council ap-s
pealed to the American Library as-
sociation, which is now canvassing the
entire country.
Libraries will be constructed in
each of the 32 cantonments. These
will be made in the form of barracks
and buildings, and will be in charge
of expert librarians. Each building
will be 40 by 120 feet in size, one
story high, and will have accommoda-
tions for 10,000 books, newspapers,
and magazines, and living quarters
for the staff. In each camp it is
planned to have a library headquar-
ters with books and periodicals for
reading room use, together with a
complete system for distributing
agencies, thus affording the soldiers
a first class city library service. Three
hundred and fifty thousand new books
will probably be bought.
Libraries Successful Elsewhere

Libraries established by other coun-
tries, such as Greate Britain, France
and Germany, are proving - of great
value as a substitute for the drinking,
gambling and other dissipations which
are often found in training camps.
Books brought in so far have been
of every sort, but it is thought that
many more students have text-books
which they are not using, and which
would be given a warm welcome.

MICIIIDS IN GRIDIRON
CONTEST-41 -O1
SPARKSO WIEMAN, AND RYE
SCORE FOR MAIZE
AND BLUE
VICTORY IS EASY
FOR WOLVERINES
Yost Gives Substitutes Opportunity to
Get Actual Experience
on Field
Michigan beat Case by a score of
41 to 0 on Ferry field yesterday aft-
ernoon, stopping all attempts to ad-
vance by forward passes, and making
long end runs and gains by straight,
line-bucking football.
Sparks, Wienan and Ryescored for
Michigan, Wieman scoring three
touchdowns and kicking five goals.
Sparks not only brought two touch-
downs, but piloted the team in three
quarters in heady style. Genebach,
playing at quarter in the third period,
could not put the team through the
scoring process.
Stitt, quarterback on the Case team,
was the only man who caused Michi-
gan trouble. He was in nearly every
play, and would have gained much
more ground if he had not been ham-
pered by poor passes from the Case
center.
No time-out was taken by Wolverine
players, showing that Trainer Harry
Tuthill has put the squad in the prop-
er condition for hard work. Michi-
gan was penalized five yards on four
occasions for being off-side, and 15
yards for holding. No penalties were
placed on Case.
Several substitutes were given a
chance to play in the Michigan line-up.
Cohn started the game at Froemke's
place, being relieved by the latter'late
in the game. Rye, substituted, for
Hanish in the second quarter, scored
a touchdown before Joe replaced him,
and finished the game.
Fortune replaced Goodsell at guard,
and Goodsell replaced Beath at cen-
ter, while Graff relieved Weske. Goetz,
was given a chance at guard.
Showing decidedly superior power,
the Wolverine warriors romped over
Case in the opening . quarter. Bad
passing made it impossible for Stitt to
get his punts away, and helped the
Wolverines to both touchdowns. .Wie-
man, aided by Cohn and Hanish,
pounded through the Case forwards
for the first touchdown. Sparks added
the second on a pretty run. Wieman
kicked both goals.
Sparks opened the second quarter
with a run through the Case eleven
which carried the ball 50 yards to
Case's 15-yard line. After short
plunges by the Wolverine backs,
Sparks carried the leather over. Stitt
tried several forward passes, but no
one covered them and the Case quar-
ter contributed a. pretty 11-yard dash.
Short plunges added another touch-
(Continued on page three)
UNION TO GIVE FRESHMEN
SONG FEST THIS AFTERNOON
Music, speeches, smokes, and lots of
good cheer are promised for those who
attend the gathering to be held at
3:30 o'clock this afternoon at the
Michigan Union. This meeting, which
is the first of a series of Sunday aft-

ernoon gatherings, is intended prim-
arily. for freshmen, but upperclassmen
will be welcome.
Prof. John R. Brumm of the rhetoric
department will address the assembly
and Waldo McKee, '18E, vice-president
of the Union will preside.
Several members of the Varsity Glee
club will ive selections at the begin-
ning of ~ program. Freshmen, are
requested to bring their "Freshman
Bibles' 'in order that they may ha
the words of the Michigan songs
which are to be sung during the
course of;the afternoon. "
N * * * * * * * * * * * *
* NOTICE

*:
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a:
M
X
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1

* e. .* * 'I * * * * * * *. *
The dinner for student mem- *
bers of the Ann Arbor Liberty *
loan committee originally sched- *
uled for tomorrow evening has *
been changed to Friday evening *
at the Union immiediately after *
Convocation. Each campus organ- *
ization is expected to have one *
member present *
* * * * * * * * * *,.* * *

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
CEtO CE WCOLEMAN
President of the Northern Baptist Convention and Founder
of the Sunday Evening Ford Hall Meetings
Tonight Tonight
7:30 MethVIodist huch7:30

i.

NORMAL COLLEGE CONCERT COURSE
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Director
PEASE AUDITORIUM

s League to Launch Campaign
ad of waiting until November
n the fail membership cam-
the Women's league will put
strong efforts next week to
n its already considerable
rship list: Ruth McLaughlin,
chairman of the committee.

P.L ,J ANTIT

1.
2.
3.

SEASON 1917-1918
SASCHA JACOBINOFF, Violinist, Oct. 17. 4. CHRISTMAS MUSIC BY THE COLLEGE CHOIR, Dec. 13.
LOUIS GRAVEURE, Song Recital, Nov. 5. 200 singers under direction of Frederick Alexander.
SOCIETE DES INSTRUMENTS ANCIENS, Dec. 7. 5. PHILADELPHIA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Jan. 9.
Quinton; Viole de Gambe; Viole d'Amour; Basse de Viole; Clavecin. 6. THE ST. MATHEW PASSION MUSIC by J. S. Bach.
The College Choir and Soloists. Date to be announced.
Reserved Seats for six concerts $2.50. On sale Tuesday, Oct. 9, at 4 P. X. Pease Auditorum, Box Office. Mail Orders filled in order of
receipt. Cheeks should be drawn to Frederick Alexander, Director. Single Concerts, $1.50 and $2.00.

4'1 1

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All students taking military
training will assemble in the rear
of University balli at 4 o'clock
Monday afternoon.. Important.
LIEUTENANT G. C. MULLEN.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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