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December 18, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1917.

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ASKS STUDENTS TO.
PRESERVE MORALE
Prof. W. A. Prayer Outlines Duty of
Amerieans at Union Mixer
Sunday
"Whatever else happens, we have
to see to it, first of all, that the mor-
ale of the country is what it should
be," said Prof. William A. Frayer, in
an informal talk at the mixer held
Sunday afternoon at the Union.
Professor Frayer spoke of the du-
ties which are incumbent upon every
American. He said that the citizens
of the United States must learn de-
privation and must stand behind their
government just as the Germans have
stood behind theirs. Divided alleg-
iance, he said, would not long be tol-
erated. He added, too, that the Ger-.
mans were not lambs led to their
slaughter, but that they had rushed to
.arms with willingness.
"Here is the astounding instance of
a whole people sliding back to a stand-
ard which would have made Attila
himself blush," declared the speaker
in refering to the actions of the Ger-
man people as a whole.
"We are in this war; we are going
to stay in it; and we are going to win
it," concluded Professor Frayer.
During the afternoon music was
furnished by an orchestra composed
of W. L. Patton, '21E, Harry Sunley,!
'20, Elmer H. Luther, '21, and John B.
Merton, '21E.
1000 JOIN RED CROSS
AT PATRIOTIC MEETI

in have
pierce
toward

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MKOFC:

HICAGO POST
APPEAL

LOCAL HELP

I

been

ng fronts where Russian
re been engaged and also ex-
he naval forces of the con-
arties.
TO CONSIDER PLANS
OMING SUMMER SESSION
ie Appropriations at Next
d Meeting To Re Held
Dec.22
lations for the 1918 summer
ill be made when the annual
presented at the next Board
s meeting Dec. 22. Work for
er will be decided upon and
:en as to various changes to
n the curriculum.
he war situation becoming
e, it is the object of the ad-
ye officers to make the 1918
stronger than ever. "It is
conceded," said Dean Ed-
Craus of the summer session,
of the nation's greatest needs
ne is a vast body of highly
>ung men and women. Com-
industry are recognizing to-
ver before, the value of col-
university training. Every-
re is a great demand for the
It therefore behooves every
ow in the University to plan
s as rapidly as possible with
s and complete the require-
degrees.
udents realize that the sum-
on affords unexcelled oppor-
shorten the period of resi-
re. It is obvious that the
student is along in his col-
se the better he will be pre-
serve his country when the
s to him. The plans for the
f 1918 include well-balanced
of study in all divisions of

One thousand men and women join-
ed the. Red Cross at the close of the
Union patriotic meeting held at Hill
auditorium Sunday night. In response
to appeals made by speakers at the
monster gathering, one-third of the
assemblage declared its willingness to
help the organization which is doing
its utmost for the suffering in this
great struggle.
Duncan Clark, critic and editorial
writer of the Chicago Evening Post,
was the principal speaker of the eve-
ning. He presented the issue of the
Red Cross Christmas campaign to
the audience and made an emphatic
appeal for help in Ann Arbor.
Emphasizes Need of Help
"There never has been an hour since
August, 1914, when the need for help
was greater than it is today," Mr.
Clark said. "The Red Cross offers to
every one the opportunity to do his
or her share in this great struggle,
and enables all to do their duty."
Mr. Clark outlined the work of the
Red Cross abroad and attacked the
"traitors, pacifists, and self-centered
individuals" who refused to help the
Red Cross because their personal feel-
ings did not allow them to do any-
thing that would in any way help the
United States in her struggle. He then
assailed those who refuse to support
the Red Cross on the ground that the
government ought to take care of this
work, and exclaimed: "I thank God
tonight because there is something
left for us to do of our own free will
without being taxed."
Appeals for Members
Frederick W. Stevens, former state
director of the Michigan Red Cross,
acted as chairman of the meeting and
told the audience of the great need
for help at the present time. He said
in part: "The morale of the. people
of France must and will be maintain-
ed, and the thing that will help most
to maintain it will be the fact that
15,000,000 men and women in this
country are members of the Red;
Cross."-
Ray C. Bassett, '13, county chairman
of the Red Cross membership commit-
tee, and Prof. Warren P. Lombard of
the phsyiology department, made ap-
peals for the support of the work done
by the Ann Arbor women in makin
surgical dressings.
The University Glee club rendered
the "Battle Hymn of the Republic,"
underthe direction of Robert Dieterle,
'18.

HoUSE HIFTSBDR
VOTE.-TO STATES
Speaker Clark Announces Measure
Passed By -More Than
25 Counts
ANN ARBOR REPRESENTATIVE
CASTS VOTE FOR AMENDMENT
House Resolutions Give Legislatures
Seven Years to Decide
Question
Washington, Dec. 17.-The resolu-
tion to submit to the states a national
prohibition amendment to the federal
constitution was adopted late today
by the house. With a vote of two-
thirds required for its approval thel
vote of the house announced by'
Speaker Clark was 282 to 128. or 25
more than required. Representative
Samuel W. Beakes of Ann Arbor, was
among the Michigan members voting
for the -amendment.
A similar resolution was passed by
the senate at the last session, but the
house resolution gives the state leg-
islatures seven years in which to ap-
prove the amendment while that of
the senate gives only six. A motion
to concur in the change will be made
in the senate tomorrow, but if one
member objects, action will have to
go over until after the holidays.
An amendment by representative Lea
of California, providing that the pro-
hibition provision should not apply to
light wines and beer was rejected by
a rising vote of 232 to 107.
HOME USERS TO
GET COAL FIRST
Fuel Administration Asks Miners To
Observe Only Christmas
as.Holiday
Washington, Dec. 17.-Prospects of
a wide spread and serious coal famine
drew from Fuel Administrator Gar-
field today a request that operators
and miners take only Christmas day
as a holiday this season instead of
the several days usually observed.
The custom has been to stop work for
at least three days at both Christmas
and New Years.
Householders throughout the nation
will be taken care of first in coal dis-
tribution even ahead of industries, the
fuel administration announced tonight.
In line with this policy Administra-
tor Garfield today gave W. K. Prudden,
fuel administrator for Michigan, au-
thority to shut off supplies to indus-
trial plants or to any others users if
necessary to meet the needs of domes-
tic consumers.
State authorities elsewhere, it was
announced, will be given the same
powers if it appears the situation war-
rants such radical measures.
PREMIER BORDEN
LEADS ELECTION
Toronto, Dec. 17.-An official sum-
mary late tonight gave the results of
the Dominion election today as fol-
lows: Government candidates elect-
ed, 110; opposition candidates, 83;
to be heard from, 38; deferred, 4.
Government candidates. are those
led by Premier Sir Robert L. Borden;
the opposition is that headed by Sir
Wilfred Laurier.

DEAN JORDAN LEAVES TODAY;
AGNES WELLS IS ACTING DEAN
Dean Myra B. Jordan, who has nearly
recovered from her recent illness, will
leave Tuesday evening for the South.
Dean Jordan will spend Christmas in
Louisiana, and from there will go to
California.
During her absence, which will ex-
tend until the latter part of June, Miss
Agnes E. Wells, the present social
director of Newberry residence, will
be acting Dean of Women.
Hold Homoeopathie Clinic Pay Dec. 20
Student clinic day will be held on
Dec. 20, by the Homoeopathic hospit-
al. Only students of the University
will be operated on during the day.
Dr. T. J. Yoemans, Dr. G. I. Naylor,
and Dr. D. W. Myers will be in charge.
It was stated that the clinic will ex-

Relkort of New Ruling tob he Held
Open Meeting of Council After
Christmas Holidays

at

Present taxi rates are illegal ac-
cording to a ruling, which was made
last night at the meeting of the com-
mon council, by Frank DeVine, cityt
attorney for Ann Arbor. f
As a result of a number of com-
plaints from the students, including
one from the Student council, that
have been referred to City Attorney
DeVine against the taxi companies of
this city, he has framed a new set of
ordinances which were turned over
to the ordinance committee for con-
sideration.
Suggest New Rates
The new ordinance suggests the
adoption of the following rates:
For a passenger to any part of the;
city between the hours of 6 o'clock in
the morning and 12 o'clock midnight,
35 cents; for each additional stop, 25
cents. From midnight until 6 o'clock
in the morning the new rules pro-
rose the double rates of 50 cents and
e5 cents for each additional stop. One-
half fare is to be charged for children
over six years of age, and those below
six are to go free,- provided they are
accompanied by their elders. No
charge is to be made for hand bag-
gage carried by passengers.
The old rates were 25 cents for a
single trip to any part of the city
from the hours of 6 o'clock in the
morning until 11 o'clock in the eve-
ning. The double rate of 50 cents
was the old rate from the hours of 11
o'clock at night until 6 o'clock in the
morning. The new rates will thus give,
the students an advantage of another
hour, from 11 o'clock until midnight,
before the double rates are to go into
effect.
Controiersy Starts in November
The controversy about. the rates be-
gan on Nov. 5, when the taxi com-
panies of this city petitioned the
council for a raise in the rates as
granted them according to the old
ordinances. This petition immediate-
ly brought forth a flood of protests
from the students. Numerous cases
were cited by the protestants of their
being charged exhorbitant rates by
the taxi men whenever they could take
advantage of them. The result of the
protests was the reference of the en-
tire case to the city attorney who has
handed in his decision at last night's
meeting.
The ordinance committee is expect-
ed to report on this new ordinance at
the first meeting of the council aft-
er the closing of the Christmas vaca-
tion. The floor of the council will be
opened to the students and general
public to give their reasons for or
against the new ordinance.
ICE HOCKEY MAY BE LATEST
SPORT FOR COLLEGE WOMEN
Palmer Field To Be Converted Into
Rink; Skating and Tobogganing
To Be In Vogue
Palmer field will be converted into
a skating rink and toboggan slide for
University women after the Christ-
mas holidays.
This action is the outcome of an ef-
fort of the Women's athletic associa-
tion acting through the Palmer field
committee, which consists of Sec. Shir-
ley W. Smith, Dean Myra B. Jordan,
and Miss Alice Evans.
Arrangements have been made for
flooding the field on the corner of
Belcher and 14th streets which will
be cared for and used for skating.
Snow will be banked up on the hillside
and a toboggan slide built. Primarily
intended for University women, the
rink will be open occasionally to men.

The field will afford an opportunity
for ice hockey for women. This fac-
tor, the absence of available outdoor
rinks elsewhere, ,the opportunity af-
forded beginning skaters, and the free
admission, will make this innovation
in the athletic .department popular
among University women.

DECLARES TAXICAB
Frank DI Vine, City Attorney, Says
Party Rates Now in Effect
Are Exhorbitint
SU'GGESTS ADOPTION OF NEW
TRANSPORTITION ORDINANCE

LOOKS FOR RELIEF
IN COAL SHORTAGE
R1egent Junius E. Beal Expects Fuel To
Arrive In Ann Arbor Within
10 Days
"Relief in the coal shortage will
come within 10 days," said Regent
Junius E. Beal, fuel administrator for
Washtenaw county, yesterday.
"I have received a letter from State
Fuel Administrator W. K. Prudden,
stating that a large shipment of coal
is on the way but has been delayed
by a freight blockade near Columbus,
Ohio," he continued. This will be here
within a week and will greatly re-
lieve that situation.
Local coal dealers claim that the
present shortage is due to the hoard-
ing of coal by private families. One
dealer states that this is the worst coal
famine he has encountered in this city
for 32 years. The worst part is past
as there will be enough fuel to supply
the entire city within 10 days.
December Inlander Appears Today
Inlander is out today. Business
staff women of the publication will
be stationed at University hall, the
Engineering building and other places
on the campus selling the magazines.
Receipts from last month's sale ex-
ceed those - of former issues. In con-
sideration of this fact and the live
contributions entered in the number,
and even larger sale for this month, is
anticipated.
O U ULOCAL REGISTRNTS
MEN RESPONSIBLE FOR RETURN
OF BLANKS; SHOULD LEAVE
. HOME ADDRESSES
The first five Der cent of the ques-
tionnaires for Washtenaw county have
been sent out by the local draft board
and an equal number will be mailed
daily for twenty days until each of
the 4,705 registrants are supplied.
All of the students at the Univer-
sity who were registered last June
are affected by the regulations govern-
ing the questionnaire. Students who
have recently enlisted in various
branches of service will also have to
fill out these blanks. Only men who
are at present in the national army
are exempted from observing these re-
quirements.

LITERARY
OLUTI

WAR CERM
OF CREE
BOARD 0

Students leaving the
enter government service
en a special war certifi
their class in the Unive
cause for leaving, if a r
troduced by Prof. R. M. '
literary faculty meetin
passes the Boaird of Reg
President H. B. Hutch
J R. Effinger were nan
the methods in which tl
may best be prsented to t
The resolution read:
"That the President or
particular department
quested and authorized
fore the Board of Reger
tion of war certificates I
to students who are comp
draw from the University
service of the United S
ment."
A resolution was als
lowing students withdr
the middle of the seme
the service to take exa
the courses they are ca
student passes the work
during the semester in a
factory to his instructor
given equitable credit
credit to be determined
vidual instructor.
BARRISTERS E
NINE SENIO

cie
te
tii
qu
M
B

Should Get Transfers lia
Students at the University are plac- J
ed in a very unusual situation regard- M<
ing this matter. tb
A large number of registered stu- bb
dents are living at a great distance to
from the board where they registered sp
this summer and with whom all pre-
sent dealings must be held. Prof. C
Edwin C. Goddard of the law faculty
has advised students to send in with
their questionnaires a request to their
local boards asking to be transferred di
to the board for this county where ha
they might then take their physical C
examinations. Examinations will be
held again whether they have been co
taken before or not. th
Draft boards all over the country *o
have begun to mail out their question- ic
naires and a large number of them tr
will find their way to this city after th
the students to whom they are ad-
dressed have gone home for the holi-
days.
"It is important that these men p1
should leave directions for the for- tic
warding of their questionnaires," said
Professor Goddard, "since the govern- th
ment has placed the responsibility of th
returning them upon the men them- di
selves, and all men who do not send m
them in within seven days after their to
despatch will automatically fall into di
class one."

MEN LEAV
MAY B
Will Lose Not

Barristers, senior law h
ety, held its annual fall it
rday afternoon. After
on the members assemble
uet at the Union.
Following are the initia
. Allan, Edward C. Butle
Bowman, Harold M. I
am S. Kammerer, Herma
hn J. Poleski, James E
arion S. Harlan. The
*e evening was Prof. Wil
our. Frank S. Kremer
astmaster and William S
poke in behalf of the neo
LUSTER Y. M. C. A. MEN
ACTUAL TRENCH Ex

Camp Custer
ers are not t
ave actual tree
uster, for whe
ompleted, loc
he center will
ut. From this
,ation will le,,
ench system.
he plan now bE

i

erman A.

Law Board Advises Students
The members of the law faculty fre
acting as an advisory board to all
students in this matter and hold reg-
ular hours daily from 10 to 12 o'clock,
in room D of the Law building, where
they may be met for advice. The law
faculty expects to assist about 500
students in this way during the vaca-
tion. They have offered to notary the
necessary legal papers for students
without any charge.

graduated
Wednesda
tagious w
tal with
smallpox.
the infecti
and an ep

Taylor, '18E, Weds Depew, '19, Friday'
Miss Esther M. Depew, '19, and
Paul Bowdish Taylor, '18E, were mar-
ried Friday evening in this city, the
Rev. N. C. Fetter officiating. Taylor
IC. a. +*m miitl mdclomn in engin-

Spanish

I'

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